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February 19, 1950 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

..

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1950

r.TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

5

Union

To

Sponsor

Activities

mo ker

Tonight

i

-!y

Men's Glee
Club Oldest
In America
Covers Nation in
Concert Tours
Organized in 1843, the Univer-
sity Men's Glee Club is the oldest
college glee club in the country.
Under the present constitution
drawn up in 1859, club members
elect a choir director and officers
each spring to conduct the ad-
ministration and planning for the
following year.
MOST OF THE Glee Club's ap-
pearances are away from Ann
Arbor. During the past two years
the Club has appeared before an
estimated 36,000 persons from New
York to Des Moines, including
r programs in New York, Washing-
ton, Binghamton, Syracuse, Buf-
falo, Cleveland, Toledo, Detroit,
Grand Rapids, Joliet, and Des
Moines.
Twice a year the Glee Club
presents full concerts before Ann
Arbor audiences, and at Christ-
mas, the Men's Glee Club com-
bines with the Women's Glee
Club to present a concert of
Christmas songs.
In May, the Club presents its
regular program in Hill Auditor-
ium. In addition to personal ap-
pearances, the Club makes sever-
al broadcasts each year, as well as
special recordings.
* * *
ALL MALE students are eligible
to tryout for the Glee Club. Ac-
tually less than 3 per cent of the
members are music students, and
Club officials emphasize that it
is not an organization for music
students.
Rehearsals are held from 7:30
to 9 p.m., Thursday, and from
3 to 5 p.m., Sunday in Rm. 3GI
of the Union. Approximately
four hours a week are required
for rehearsals.
Students desiring further infor-
mation should contact any Glee
Club member, or visit the office
in Rm. 3G of the Union during re-
hearsals.

Program Will Feature
Talks, Movies, Exhibits
By BOB KEITH
The Union will throw open its doors to hundreds of men eligible
for extra-curricular activities today when it sponsors its annual
"Activities Smoker" at 7:30 pm. in the second, floor Ballroom.
'he smoker will provide students with comprehensive informa-
tion about all phases of student-spoisored activity, from The Daily
to Student Legislature.
, * * * *
FEATURING TALKS, music, movies and exhibits made possible
through the combined efforts of 24 leading campus organizations,
the smoker will be of greater magnitude than any since 1941.
It will be touched off by a short program prepared by Union
student staffmen and presented under the surveillance of master
of ceremonies Robert Halbrook, '51.
The program will include introductory remarks by Union presi-

'U' Players
Offer Stage
Experience
Students eager to "walk the
boards" will find the "Student
Players" an excellent starting
point for the long climb to theat-
rical fame.
Designed to provide experience
in all phases of theatre entertain-
ment, the Student Players stress
acting, backstage and publicity
work.

-Daiy--wally Bart
FINAL PREPARATIONS--Union student staffers Jerry Mehl-
man, '51, (left), and Jim Moran, '52, check over one of the big
Kleig spotlights which will be used to point out various exhibits
at the "Activities Smoker" tonight. The two have supervised the
affair.

* * *

m * *

Student Staffers Direct
Special Union A ff airs

Roster of
Activities
In Smoker
All organizations participat-
ing in tonight's "Activities
Smoker" in the Union Ballroom
are listed below. Descriptions
of these organizations will be
found on the following four
pages.
The Editors
Alpha Phi Omega
Association of Independent
Men
Campus

A complex system of boards,
councils and committees has been
built to handle the packed slate
of activities carried out each year
by the Michigan Union.
Paid workers take care of the
physical operations of the build-
ing, but student volunteers pitch
in to carry out the special Union-
sponsored social and academic
events.
* * *
STUDENT staffers are directed
by the Union's Student Activity
Offices. Work is parceled up
among seven standing commit-
tees, each headed by a member of
a 13-man Executive Council.
All men are eligible for com-
mittee work. Tryouts should ex-
pect to spend a few hours a
week in the offices. Committees
are Personnel and Planning,
Student Relations, House, Cam-
pus Affairs, Publicity, Admin-
istration and Social.
Their projects include activities

BUSINESS and
SECRETARIAL TRAINING
ACCOUNTING - TYPING
Shorthand - Machine Shorthand
BUSINESS MACHINES
Single Subjects or Complete Courses
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE

of interest to the whole campus,
such as the traditional Michigras
carnival, orientation programs,
theatre trips, tutorial service, a
winter carnival, football ticket re-
sale, bridge tournaments, student
faculty coffee hours, dances and
the activities smoker.
* Y:
AT THE END of their sopho-
more year committee members
become eligible for appointment,
by means of a merit system, to a
post on the Junior Council.
Heading the entire student
organization are two senior off-
icers, a president and secretary,
who are chosen by a committee
of the Union Board of Directors.
These two officers, along with
six vice-presidents selected in
yearly campus-wide elections, act
as student members of the Board
of Directors.
TEN OTHER members of the
Board represent faculty, alumni
and the Board of Regents.
TU' Wolverine
Club Pushes
. .
SchoolSpirit
Devoting itself to the promotion
of school spirit, the Wolverine Club
helps out at a number of campus
affairs and promotes several activ-
ities of its own.
Active from September to June,
the co-educational club first starts
to roll by aiding at registration for
classes.
WHEN PIGSKIN time comes the
organization plans and executes
pep rallies, decorates goal posts,
directs flash card stunts and pre-
pares team send-offs and recep-
tions.f
Members also aid in ticket dis-
tribution, arrange trips for away
from home games, sell pep pins,
plan basketball halftime enter-
tainment and work with Home-
coming Dance and Display com-
mittees.
Latest projects of the Wolverine
Club include transportation to the
airport and the sale of the Michi-
gan Record Yearbook.

Daily Business
Daily Editorial

Staff
Staff

'Ensian
Flying Club
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Gargoyle
Inter-Arts Union
Interfraternity Council
Men's Glee Club
Michigras
Michigan Union
Phoenix Project
Sailing Club
Sigma Rho Tau
Student Legislature
Student Players
Technic
Union Opera
West Quadrangle
Wolverine Club
WSSF

lent Bill Wise, '50, and music
┬░urnished by 'the Men's Glee Club
under the direction of Wayne
Wright.
NARRATION OF pertinent in-
formation about each group re-
presented at the smoker will high-
light the program. It will be
handled by Tom Cramer and
George Irving.
As they speak, two spotlights
will focus on booths set up along
the Ballroom walls by partici-
pating organizations. Booths
will be fitted out in full regalia
to portray the activities under-
taken by each group.
Colored -movies of the 1941
Michigauma initiation - when
Tom Harmon was inducted -
will conclude the formal portion
of the program. They will be ex-
plained by alumnus Stuart Fin-
layson, field secretary of the
Michigan Alumni Associatelon.
Afterwards students will have
time to circulate among the
booths and talk with club mem-
bers. Free refreshments, includ-
ing soft drinks and doughnuts
will be served.
Booths will be furnished ac-
cording to the whim of the vari-
ous organizations. Some have
promised to install record players,
and special electric devices.'
* * *
THE SMOKER IS directed
primarily at the second semester
freshmen, who are eligible for ac-
tivities for the first time, provided
they have maintained at least a
"C" average. However, all other
eligible men have been invited to
attend.
A special 2$ page pamphlet,
published by the Union, will be
distributed without charge at the
get-together. It will contain stor-
ies about each participating group.
The smoker has been planned
and organized by staff members
at the Union Student Offices
under the direction of Jerry
Mehlman, '51, and Jim Moran,
'52.
Special assistants Gene Mesh,
'52, Keith Beers, '52E, and Bill Des
Jardins, '50E, have supervised per-
sonnel,

In Traditional
UnionOpera
Written, produced and acted
exclusively by men students, the
renowned Michigan Union Opera
has become one of the University's
greatest traditions.
Lightly satirizing coeds, profes-
sors, Ann Arbor and the Univer-
sity in general, the home-bred
musical comedy is presented every
spring, usually in March.
* * *
THE ANNUAL show has a long
and illustrious history, and many
of the songs it has produced-
like "When Night Falls" and
"Michiagn Men"-are still popu-
lar. At one time the Opera toured
the country, playing in New York
and other large cities.
The Opera is produced by a
staff of music writers, script writ-
ers and assistants, headed by a
general managerand his execu-
tive committee.
In addition the show features a
huge cast including the leading
actors, a dancing chorus, a sing-
ing chorus and an orchestra. All
male students are eligible to try
out for positions.
THE EXECUTIVE committee is
picked in the spring-almost a
year preceding the date of the
Opera-by the Union Council.
Staff tryouts are held shortly af-
terwards.
The organization meets in 'the
Opera office on the third floor of
the Union. Students desiring more
information should contact Bob
Russell, phone 2-5644.
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

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NO PREVIOUS acting experi-
ence is required but interested
students should be willing to co-
operate with the group. Direction
is professional, enabling even the
most experienced to profit from
membership.
Interested students can expect
to devote approximately nine
hours a week to this activity
during rehearsal periods. Re-
" hearsals are held at the League.
Directed by Mrs. Marie Miller,
professional radio, television and
Stheatrical personage, the Student
~~ ~ L~tE >Players scheduled the opening of
"Golden Boy" this weekend.
TU' Males Star

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Approved for Veterans

William at State

TWO NIGHTS OF FUN:
Lively Michigras Carnival
Hihlights Spring Calendar

new Spring colors in chic d'Orsay

~jeras
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One of the biggest events of the
spring semester is Michigras - a
biennial all-campus carnival held
in Yost Field House.
Taking place April 28 and 29,
Michigras represents the combined
efforts of most student groups on
campus, for all varieties of stu-
dents-men and women, indepen-
dent and affiliated - join their
talents to put on a rollicking car-
nival, and have fun doing so.

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HEADQWARTERS for
MEDICAL ... LAW... DENTAL
and PUBLIC HEALTH
BOOKS
STUDENT SUPPLIES
OVERBECK S
1216 South University

A TOP FEATURE of the show is
entertainment furnished by booths
lining the Field House walls. Cam-
pus residences wishing to partici-
pate take over an area for their
individual stunt - spook house,
girlie show, games, horror show,
the traditional Beta burlesque, or
selling of refreshments.
The last Michigras, in 1948,
saw 18,000 students turn out for
the two-day affair, which was
complete with a parade, me-
chanical rides, shows and con-
cessions.
Directing the proceedings this
year is the Central Committee with
Jan Olivier and Bill Peterson as
co-chairman for WAA and the
Union, which sponsor the affair.
UNDER THEM are chairmen of
the special committees: aparade,
decorations, booths, programs, re-
freshments and publicity. Students
can help put the show over by
serving on these committees.
To acquaint the campus with
the work of the specific commit-
tees and to get the project under-
way, a meeting will be held at.5
p.m. Wednesday in the Union.
The Central Committee invited
all interested students, whether or
not experienced, to. attend the
meeting.

"1950 ~1950
Fabrics In Imported and Domestic
Woolens Are Open For Your
Inspection.
Flannels, Worsteds, Sharkskins, Gabardines,
Tweeds, Shetlands and Tropical Worsteds . . .
in the late patterns and their Spring Color ef-
fects, especially designed for us. Keep in mind
Easter falls on April 9th this year so place your
orders early, and be assured of prompt delivery.

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Can't ('o meg With*. . .
" BOOKS from the Student Book Store

Prices Range From
$55.00 to $115.00
Coat and Trousers

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