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February 19, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ir T7 ____________ THEI~MIIAN iiAMLY
4CULTY FOR KNOWING:
Preuss Sees UN as Best Hope for Peace

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Students Wail, Women, Weather, Work

-"1-

j

Looking back ,on 22 years ex-
erience as a teacher and active
articipant in the field of inter-
ational relations, Prof. Lawrence
reuss staunchly maintains that
ze United Nations remains the
orld's best hope for peace.
And by using the UN's facilities
} the fullest extent, the United
bates can strengthen this hope
aineasurably, says the stocky,
it-spoken political scientist who
orked at UN's 1945 founding
)nference in San Francisco.
PROF. PREUSS' belief in UN
the first step toward a stable
nd peaceful world, comes from a
ickground of more than two de-
des of shuttling back and forth
tween Ann Arbor, Washington
ad Europe studying the law of
Etions.
In utilizing UN there is al-
vays the problem of Russian op-
position to be considered, he
admits, but "perhaps if we can

make UN work, Russia
change her ways."

will

"At any rate, saying that war
is inevitable will only make a
shooting war a reality."
* * *
PROF. PREUSS first got in-
terested in the field of interna-
tional law as an undergraduate at
the University studying under
Prof. James S. Reeves. After fin-
ishing his work here, he sailed
for Europe where he watched the
rise of Hitler and studied its ef-
fect on international, relations in
the 30's.
In 1942, he joined the State
Department where he worked
for three years putting his
knowledge of international law
to use in the organizational
meeting of UN.
He believes American officials
made a mistake in overselling UN
to the public. The result was that
people came to believe that they

could get a thoroughly efficient
international governing body
without any concessions between
world powers.
* * *
"AT SAN FRANCISCO, every-
one was overly-optimistic about the
Soviet Union's intentions toward
the new organization," Prof.
Preuss explained. "It was sabo-
tage to even comment on possible
Russian insincerity."
All the participating nations
were so anxious to make UN
work, they were willing to grant
large concessions to the Soviets
in order to gain their coopera-
tion, he pointed out.
In the State Department, Prof.
Preuss was associated with Alger
Hiss, former government official
who was recently found guilty of
perjury and sentenced to five
years in prison.
* * *
"I FOUND HIM a pleasant,
able and cooperative man," Prof.
Preuss remarked. "Beause of his
strong opposition to the fascists
before the U.S. entered the war,
he may have elected to aid the
Russians who were actively fight-
ing Germany at that time."
Once the U.S. became engaged
in the conflict, however, "Hiss'
strong security measures proved
him the most loyal of officials;
one who would have done noth-
ing to injure the U.S."
Prof. Preuss has recently re-
turned to his University class-
room duties after a year's leave
abroad where he lectured at the
Academy of International Law at
The Hague.
. . . T. . . . .t

-Daily-Herb Harrington
DAY OF PRAYER-The Schola Cantatum, Episcopal Student
Choir, will sing at the student-conducted evening vesper services
to be given today in St. Andrew's Episcopal Church as the local
observance of a World Student Day of Prayer, commemorated in
conjunction with Brotherhood Week.
Events Scheduled Here
For 'Brotherhood Week'

By JANET' WATTS
Women, weather and education
in various forms puzzled students
over the nation last week.
Michigan State College in the
future may become more and
more like her sister institution at
Ann Arbor. First the Spartans saw
fit to join the Big Ten athletic
conference. And now MSC educa-
tors are considering a two semes-
ter college year.
* * *
FACULTY AND administrators
looked over the possibilities and
found 25 advantages for the two
semester system countered by 19
disadvantages. But students found
some of the disadvantages pretty
important.
The college newspaper editor-
ialized that students could enjoy
Christmas vacation without the
fear of facing exams after the
holidays and pointed to the
greater variety of courses under
the present three term basis.
"But the crux of the problem
lies in which system will provide
the best education," the editorial
declared, leaving the question to
the educational specialists to de-
cide.
WHILE MSC students worried

about their education, men at the
University of Wisconsin tussled
with the question of whether wo-
men constitute an economic prob-
lem for the male population.
Meeting in the apartment of
the dean of women, 15 Wiscon-,
sin men decided that women
were not such a problem be-
cause they had not entered all
fields of work. But one male
had another answer, "If she
wants to go out and work I'll
keep the house."

Underground act
covered at the
Washington last

University, will speak on "Recent
tivities were dis- Work in Motivation and Percep-
University of tion" at a psychology colloquium
week with the at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the
a new campus Rackham Amphitheater.

group, the Back to Earth move-
ment.
THIS FREE THINKING group
believes all entrances to the camil-
pus should have alternate tunnel
openings which will have under-
ground connections with the util-
ity tunnels.
Psych ColloquiumnaH
Prof. Leo Postman, of the psy-
chology department at Harvard

development

of

I --

:if

CORRECTION

Many people think that Ulrich's Book
Store carries only ENGINEERING

II

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books . . . Ulrich's carry a very
stock of used and new books for
course on the Michigan campus.

huge
every

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ArtDirctin b RIHAR DA " iretorofPhotogrophy, JOSEPH VALENTINE, A.S.C.
presented by SIERRA PICTURES, In . released by RKO RADIO PICTURES
PRODUCED BY WALTER WANGER- DIREcTtD y VICTOR FLEMING
Presented by THE STUDENT LEGISLATURE
Today". .. Feb. 19 ... 8:00 P.M.

X4tehatih i

. ..

HILL AUDITORIUM

Adults $1.20

Children 50c

Students 60c

NO RESERVED SEATS
Hill Auditorium Box Office open at 7 P.M.

Glee Club - Union - League
Presents
RUVU
A star-studded program
Comedy-Music-Beautiful Girls
ZETA XI FOUR MARY LYN JOHNSON
Barber Shop Sensational Singer
Quartet Union & League
THESE TWO ACTS YOU'LL ENJOY
8 P.M. Feb. 25 8 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets on Sale at Hill Auditorium Box Office
Daily 10 - 5
60c Admission . . . 60c

DOLORES LASCHEVER
With the exception of WWJ's
symphony hour, Ann Arbor's ra-
dio fare after midnight is skimpy
enough indeed.
The classical music program
brings to the airwaves "One Hour
of the World's Great Music," pre-
senting the works of the various
composers from Mozart to Wag-
ner, Beethoven to Stravinsky.
THE TUESDAY program varies
the general procedure, when the
broadcast is highlighted by a half
hour recording of a rehearsal by
the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
Directions of the conductor-
usually Charles Muench, al-
though occasionally guest con-
ductors take over-as well as the
frequent repetition of passages
until the desired effect is
achieved helps to add to the
listeners' appreciation of the fin-
ished product.
Other programs which take the
air after midnight include WJR's
"Dawn Busters" and the "Dawn
Patrol" heard over CKLW.
THE PLEASANT thing about
"Dawn Busters" is that it isn't
marred by the usual commercials.
Taking their place, however, are
the home-spun'letters which disc
jockey Don Cordray, spends a
good part of the program reading
aloud.
More music and less innocuous
chatter would probably benefit the
show greatly. Not that we don't
admire Don Cordray; it takes a
lot of stamina and quite a "gift
of gab" to keep going from mid-
night to 5 a.m. seven days a week.
The "Dawn Patrol," on the oth-
er hand, follows a more conven-
tional pattern, featuring frequent-
ly among the musical selections
the usual ear-wearying commer-
cials.

Opening this week's campus ob-
servance of Brotherhood Week,
held internationally under the aus-
pices of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, Inter-Guild
will sponsor a local commemora-
tion of a World Student Day of
Prayer at 7:15 p.m. today in St.
Andrew's Episcopal Church.
The Day of Prayer, observed in-
ternationally for the past ten years
under the sponsorship of the
World's Student Christian Federa-
tion, will be all-student conducted.
Students of all faiths are invited,
according to Bill Roberts, Inter-
Guild worship committee chair-
man.
SINGING AT THE evening ves-
per services will be the Schola
Cantatum, Episcopal Student
Choir, under the direction of
George Hunche.
Two awards for the further-
ance ofabrotherhood on campus
will be presented at the Student
Religious Association's annual
Brotherhood Banquet for cam-
pus religious leaders at 6:15 p.m.
tomorrow at Lane Hall.
The Arnold Schiff Memorial In-
terfaith Award, valued at $100,
was established in 1943. Fifty dol-
lars in books or periodicals will also
Campus Art I
Sought by IAU'
The Inter-Arts Union has is-
sued a call for contributions of
art, poetry, sculpture, music and
one-act plays for the Student Art
Festival to be held March 17 to 19.
Plays and poems are needed im-
mediately, according to president
Ed Chudacoff, and may be submit-
ted to Marvin Felheim of the Eng-
lish department.
Musical contributions may be
given to Prof. Oliver Edel of the
music school, and art work to
Portia Prettie, who may be con-
tacted at 2-2539.
IFC Will Return
Unsold Textbooks
Students must pick up unsold
books from the IFC Book Ex-
change, Rm. 3B of the Union, from
1-5 p.m. tomorrow, Tuesday and
Wednesday, Tony Palermo, assist-
ant manager of the Exchange
warned yesterday.
Books not picked up by the Wed-
nesday deadline become the prop-
erty of the Exchange and cannot
be returned under any circum-
stances, Palermo emphasized.
Checks for books sold will be
miailed out "at least a week from
tomorrow," he added.

be given to the winner of the
Michigan B'nai B'rith Council In-
terfaith Award.
The two awards will be given to
the two students who have done
the most to further interfaith re-
lations on campus.
Speaking at the dinner will be
Radin Suivanto, secretary of the
Indonesian Embassy. He will dis-
cuss the problems of brotherhood
from the Asiatic point of view,
and be present at a open reception
at 9 p.m. in the Lane Hall Library.
YD Campaign
To Hit Unclean,
ivWash Rooms
What promises to be one of the
most "odious" campaigns yet con-
ducted on this campus is "Opera-
tion Head", brainchild of the
Young Democrats Club.
Conceived by Lyn Marcus and
Floyd Marks, '50, officers of the
organization, this project has for
its goal establishment of proper
washroom facilities, as well as the
enforcement of sanitary regula-
tions, in campus area restaurants.
According to Marcus and Marks,
the lack of lavatory facilities has
long been a thing of physical pain
to many restaurant-going stu-
dents.
Following a policy of public ser-
vice at any level, the Young Dem-
ocrats plan to consult city statutes
concerning requirements for these,

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ALL LEATHER BOWLING BALL BAGS
Values to 10.95 .....SALE PRICE 4.95

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CERTS

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY
PAUL PARAY, Guest Conductor
Thursday, February 23, 8:30 P.M.
Program: Overture to "The Magic Flute"................Mozart
Symphony No. 4, D minor ..................Schumann
"La Valse"............... ......... .....Ravel
Suite, "Pelleas et Melisande"....................Faure
"Sorcerer's Apprentice".........................Dukas
CHICAGO SYMPHONY
FRITZ REINER, Guest Conductor
Sunday, March 12, 7:00 P.M.
Program: Overture to "Leonore" No. 2.................Beethoven
! Paganiniana................................ Casella
Symphony No. 2, C major.................. Schumann
Siegfried's Rhine Journey
Good Friday Spell
Ride of the Valkyries
....Wagner
mELb, .f w f - ~d"A" A Min3 %I".e U, *

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