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April 22, 1950 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-22

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THE MI~HIGAN DAILY

SATUB DAY, APR ML 2, 950#

C

I

FIRST YEAR SUCCESSFUL:
Inter-Arts Elections Set for Today

By ROMA LIPSKY
New officers and executive
council members for Inter-Arts
Union, which has become a major
campus group in little more than
a year, will be elected at the sec-
ond annual membership, meeting
at2 p.m. today in the Kalamazoo
Room of the League.K m
Present members of IAU in-
clude everyone who has done any1
work on an Arts Union project1
during the past year.
* * * .
THE IDEA for an Arts Union
began when members of the music
school Assembly called a meeting
with representatives of variousi
arts in February, 1949.1
Out of this meeting grew a

committee "to serve as a hub
for creative activities on cam-
pus and a clearing house for
arts," Strowan Robertson, IAU
vice-president, said. ,
About the time of the first Stu-
dent ArtFestival in the spring
of 1949, the group decided to form
a permanent organization "to do
things which can't be achieved
within one department, but need
the co-operation of various de-
partments," he explained.
.* * *
"THROUGHOUT the Festival
we attempted to use each art as
much as possible and to have all
productions designed and execut-
ed by students.

OPERATION FRIENDSHIP:
Cheap Travel, Study Offered
To U. S., ForeignStudents

Operation Friendship, an experi-
ment in international understand-
ing, will be launched this summer
-by students and for students.
The program, originated by a
student travel agency, allows for-
eign students to come to this coun-
try for summer study at drastical-
ly reduced rates, provided the
students are sponsored by Amer-
ican individuals or groups. The
sponsors are expected to provide
housing, employment and hospi-
tality for the students.
THROUGH OPERATION
Friendship, a foreign student who
comes to the U.S. for summer
study receives a $100 reduction on
round trip trans-Atlantic air pas-
sage. This brings the rates down
to $255 for an individual. There
are greater reductions for mem-
bers of groups.
In addition, 10% of the stu-
dents will receive free trans-
portation to the U.S. and back.
The student agency sponsoring
the program also arranges Euro-
pean study tours for American
students at greatly reduced rates.

"THE RATES are so low that
many students who have not been
able to study abroad before are
now enabled to do so," Dick Arne-
sen, '51, said yesterday. He is lo-
cal representative for the agency.
Arnesen pointed out that stu-
dents have a choice of colleges
and universities in Sweden, Den-
mark, France, Germany and
Italy. All expenses, including
tuition, room, board and travel,
are included in the list price
of each trip.
Among the courses offered is
one at the University of Vienna,
where classes will be held in the
battlemented towers of a castle.
OTHER TOURS include the
University of Heidelberg, at $590,
and the College International de
Cannes, on the French Riviera, at
$595.
Any individuals or groups inter-
ested in lending their support to
Operation Friendship, and any
students interested in foreign
study tours, may contact Arnesen
by calling 2-8256.

"The idea of the Student Art
Festivals is to establish a com-
munity of the arts. If one art
is failing, all must suffer," Rob-
ertson said, adding that IAU
provides a necessary meeting
place for sharing ideas.
During the past year, Inter-Arts
Union has produced three plays
and a bill of one-acts, as well as
the second three-day Student Art
Festival. IAU was also responsible
for the start of "Generation," new
student art magazine which will
publish its second issue on May 23.
STRESSING that one of the
functions of the Arts Union is to
encourage student production of
student work, Robertson regretted
that people active in IAU have
had to rely so heavily on their
own work.
"We would like to extend our
scope to include new works by
new people, and encourage writ-
ers to plan their work for the
people on campus they know
are available to perform it."
For next year's festival, IAU
would like to produce an opera, he
said, but for this to be possible,
writers, composers, actors, singers
and stage designers will have to
work together from the beginning.
ROBERTSON declared that one
of the main factors in getting the
Arts Union firmly established has
been the tireless work of its facul-
ty adviser, Prof. Oliver Edell, of
the music school.
He stressed the fact that all stu-
dents who have worked on any
IAU program are considered mem-
bers eligible for election to the
council and urged all members to
attend this afternoon's meeting.
* e *
Arts Meeting
Tomorrow
The first of a series of work-
shops to coordinate student work
in theatre, art, dance and music
will be held at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow.
Under the sponsorship of the
Inter-Arts Union, this first meet-
ing will deal with contemporary
song.
* * *
IT WILL PROVIDE an oppor-
tunity for singers, writers and
composers to work together in the
production of the art song, Joyce
Edgar, IAU member in charge of
the group, explained.
"People interested in the same
art form should work jointly,
and a group of this type will
serve as a means of bringing
them together," she said.
Emphasizing that the meeting
is primarily for those interested
in working on the production of
art songs, Miss Edgar requested
persons who wish to attend to
call her at 2-3119 for additional
information.
Future discussion groups have
been planned in theatre, dance
and art work, she added.
Use Daily Classifieds
And Save Money

Pageant
To Feature
'Music Trip'
To prove that music is a com-
mon language to all people, the
International Pageant at 2 p.m.
tomorrow will be presented as a
musical trip around the world,
starting and ending in the United
States, according to Mrs. Anti-
onette Leeds, vice chairman of
World Cooperation Week.
The program is one of the high-
lights of International Week,
which is being celebrated in Ann
Arbor this week. It will be held at
Pattengill Auditorium in Ann Ar-
bor high school, where the 50 cent
tickets may also be purchased.
LATIN AMERICAN dances and
songs, a special Hawaiian dance
plus the traditional hulu dance,
and the Philippine candle dance,
as well as Chinese, Indian, Ara-
bian and European dances and
songs, all performed by foreign
students, willbe featured.
A typical three course Arab
dinner at 7 p.m. at the First
Methodist Church will complete
Sunday's bill of international
fare. The dinner will be pre-
pared by Arabian students and
is open to the public.
"Social and Economic Trends in
the Arab World" will be discussed!
by Kamel Shair, Grad, at the
World Roundtable following the
dinner. A limited number of din-
ner tickets are available at the In-
ternational Center for $1.25.
* * *
AN OPEN HOUSE from 2 to 6
p.m. today will be held at the In-
ternational Center for all students
and Ann Arborites interested in
meeting foreign students.
Other campus and civic groups
will play host to many groups
of foreign students during the
week, including the Brownies of
Ann Arbor who will entertain
the children of the foreign stu-
dents, at a tea at 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day.
Prof. Charles Remer of the eco-
nomics department will lead a dis-
cussion of the question, "Should
the UN recognize Communist
China," at a UN model assembly
at 8 p.m. Wednesday in Room 130,
Business Administration Bldg.
'U' Greeks To
AttendMeet
Six delegates from the Interfra-
ternity Council and four from the
Pan Hellenic Board will represent
the University at the Big Ten IFC
Conference at the University of
Illinois this weekend.
Included in the Michigan del-
gation is John Gwin of the Office
of Student Affairs.
Bill Duerr will be chairman of
a discussion on pledge training at
teh conference, according to Jake
Jacobson, IFC president.
Interfraternity Council will elect
officers next Thursday at a house
president's meeting, Jacobson an-
nounced.
Running for both president and
vice-president are Bob Vogt, '51E,
Bob Preston, '51E, and George Mil-
roy.
The candidate for treasurer is
Dick Tinker, and Dick Ferrara and
Bill Henderson, '51B Ad, will vie
for the post of secretary.
Continuous from 1 P.M

- Last Times Today -
? YEARlS IN THE
MAKING!
sTRTS:oor by
EA$ TECHNICOLOR
STARTS SUNDAY!

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 . 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
SPRING ITEMS NOW IN-Nearly New
Clothing Shop, 311 E. Huron. Ph.
3-0166. Open 12-5:30,_Sat._10-5. )8B
SHIRTS -- Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity. ) lB
SYLVIA STUDIO OF DANCE _
Ballroom, tap, acrobatic, ballet. Over
Michigan Theater._Phone 8066. )9B
VIOLA STEIN--EXPERIENCED TYPIST
-Master's and Doctor's manuscripts
and legal work. Phone 2-9848 after
noon. _____ __)30B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
HAVING A SQUARE DANCE?
Need a caller?
Call Wayne Kuhns. 3-8506.
Rates to fit the party. )31B
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Accurate
work. Phone 3-4040. )25B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
_2-9020. )1B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Off ice Equipment Service Company.
215 E. Liberty._)4_
DOES JUNIOR keep you from going
out' Try a reliable Baby Sitter. Kid-
dieKare, 3-1121. )10B
WANTED TO TRADE
IF OUR TASTES AGREE, let's swap
classical record albums. 2-7981. )17T

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
LOVE THRU THE AGES - Sexational
Laugh-Riot at Michigras. )50P
10 MEALS FOR $4.99
The new "STREAMLINER" meal tick-
et gives you 5 lunches and .5 dinners
for only $4.99 at Club 211, 211 S. State.
Your ticket expires only when com-
pletely punched. Regular meal tick-
ets are still available. )2P
"RIP CORD" MURRAY,
Understand you have staked claim to
a plot of ground in the "ARB" al-
ready-Good man!! Don't forget to
take your 1950 ENSIAN along with
the rest of your "equipment"
_Frustrated "Nellie" )8P
HELP! 30 more women 50 more men
needed immediately to add to the
growing ranks of the Campus Escort-
Finding Service. An efficient, time-
tested organization. Don't hesitate,
write to 407 Lloyd House, W.Q. for
further amazing information! All re-
ports are confidential. Larry, Dave.
Sid. ) 57P
TRES DELICI EUX
or "BEST MEALS ON CAMPUS"
Have you tried the 39c luncheon at,
J. D. Miller's Cafeteria 211 S. State?
Entree, potato, vegetable, bread,
butter and beverage, all for only 39c.
Try it today. __)2P
SENATOR SALLY-Will you be one of
our 10,000?
_______The Hot Rod Boys )8P
WANTED-Girls, girls for the Interna-
tional Ball. Many handsome men
available at 3-1511, Ext. 358. )58P
LOST & FOUND
LOST-Racine wristwatch with metal
band. Call 250611. )64L
FOUND-Watch, April 16. Palmer Field.
R. N. Clark, 1217 Willard.)63L
FOUND AT MICHIGRAS-"Behind ttze
Iron Curtain"-The bear facts on
_Russia. )62L
LOST-Black leather wallet, initials B.B.
Phone 2-7225 B. Caswell. )61L
LOST-Horn rimmed glasses 1h red
case. 2049 Stockwell. 3-1561. )25L

PERSONAL

FOR SALE '
34 FORD TUDOR-Good mechanically.
Phone Al--20197 after 3 p.m. )92
33 PLYMOUTH TUDOR-Good trans-
portation, cheap. 213 Hinsdale. 24591.
)93
1937 DESOTO-New tires, R & H, excel-
lent condition. Best offer over $125. Ph.
24401-11 Michigan House. )94
WIEtRECORDER - Indispensable for
students of music, speech, or foreign
languages.2Demonstrator price. Ph.
Ypsilanti-9272. )6B
ENGLISH-3 speed man's bike. 2 girls'
bikes. $30 takes all three. Phone 8657
after_5:00. Ask for Warren. )91
WHf R MOTOR BIKE _- Excellent1
condition. Many extras. $90 or make
an'offer. Ph. 2-1181. )90
Motorcycle Sales
10 days only-many to choose from.
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty. Ph.
2-1748.. Open evenings. 7
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings.Large discount. Jay Angle,
wholesale representative. Ph. 2-4481.
_-_--_ __)9
Cousins on State Street
SPECIAL GROUP OF FORMALS
MARKED FOR CLEARANCE
SALE --$10. _ )3
CANARIES, Beautiful singers and fe-
males. Parakeets and Finches. Bird
supplies. Birds boarded. Ruffin'
Melody Bird Shop. 562 S. Seventh. )2B
22 FT. Royal' house trailer with lxl10
annex now available. Terms; will
take car in trade. Phone 3-1188._)95
MOTOR CYCLE 1947 Indian. 74 c.c.
black, white buddy seat, saddle bags,
windshield._500 miles._Ph. 2-8783. )85
BOY AND girls balloon tire bicycle.
Good condition. Phone 2-1892 eve-
nings.- )96
U.S. NAVY "T" SHIRTS--4c; 100%
wool athletic hose, 49c; Gabardine
pants, $5.35; Gabardine sport shirts,
$2.99; Open 'til 6 p.m. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. )a5
TWO UNDERWOOD portable typewrit-
ers, excellent condition. Ph. 6427. )8q,

, -
TM''
_ .
z. _ A
au
1 _-_ - r _. _ _

FOR SALE
1950 ENGLISH motorcycles $280 up.
India 'M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Phone 2-1748. Open evenings. )83
NEW SPECIAL OFFER-78 weeks of
TIME for only $6.87. New subscrip-
tions only. Phone Student Periodical
Agency,2-8242. _ )2
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.'
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.
77
WOMAN'S riding boots size 81. Ex-
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after
5:00. )80
HELP WANTED
STIMULATING WORK-Wanted female
model for culture pictures-Must be
21. Pay : $5.00 per /hr. Call Alex. Tel.
27603. )15H
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
ROOMS FOR RENT
DOUBLE AND SINGLE room in new.
home for business man or student,
Call after 5. Ph. 2-1820. )61R
SINGLE ROOM, man preferred. Phone
2-4239 836_Brookwood. )60R'
STUDENT LANDLORD. 1 large double
$6. % double $4.50. For men. Near
Rackham. 120 N. Ingalls. Ph. 2-6644.
) 62R
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
for medical and dental field.
408 Park Ave. Bldg. WO 3-5789
DETROIT, MICHIGAN )E
WANTED TO RENT

WANTED-Fraternity annex for school
year 1950-1951. Would like rooming
quarters for 20-25 students, prefer-
ably located in the area south of
_campus.__Call 3-4183. )6N
YOUNG COLLEGE TEACHER-Admin-
istrator desires apartment for sum- .
mer session. One wife no child, no
dog, no zither. Please phone 25-7897.
________)_7N
INSTRUCTOR wife and child, seek Uni-
versity Terrace Apt. for summer ses-
sion only. Box 215 - Daily. )8N

LAST
DAY

"THE GOLDEN STALLION"
WITHFROY ROGERS
"RIM OF THE CANYON"
WITH GENE AUTRY

LAST
DAY

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 1954
VOL. LX, No. 136
Lec$tures
The Thomas M. Cooley Lectures,
auspices of the Law School and
the William W. Cook Endowment.
Fourth series, on the general sub-
ject "Administrative Discretion
and Its Control," by Dean E.
Blythe Stason, Law School. First
lecture, "Extent of Administrative
Discretionary Power." 4:15 p.m.,
Mon., April 24, Room 150, Hutch-
ins Hall.
University Lecture. "The Toku-
gawa Novel as Illustrated by the
'Ukiyoe Painters" (illustrated).
Professor Serge Elisseeff, Harvard
University; auspices of the Depart-
ment of Far Eastern Languages
and Literatures and the Center for
Japanese Studies. 4:15 p.m., Mon.,
April 24, Rackham Assembly Hall.
University Lecture. "Research in
psychotherapy." Professor Carl
Rogers, University of Chicago, aus-
pices of the Department of Psy-
chology. 4:15 p.m., Mon., April 24,
Rackham Amphitheater.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Ed-
ward Carter Moore, Philosophy;
thesis: "Metaphysics and Pragma-
tism in the Philosophy of C. S.
Peirce," 2 p.m., Sat., April 22.
Chairman, A. W. Burks.
Education D151: All observations
in the University Elementary
School are canceled from April 24
through April 28. Meetings on

Tuesday, 3 p.m. and Thursday, 1:1
a.m. will be held as scheduled.
Doctoral Examination for Ro-
bert James Good, Chemistry; the-
sis: "An Electron Diffraction In-
vestigation of Surface Reactions in
the Flotation Separation of Sul-
fide Minerals," 2 p.m., Mon., April
24, 2038 Chemistry Bldg. Chair-
man, L. O. Brockway.
Concerts
Student Recital: Jane Williams,
Soprano, will present a program
in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Music at 4:15 p.m.,
April 22, Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter. A pupil of Arthur -Hackett,
Miss Williams will sing composi-
tions by Paradies, Pergolesi, Pucci-
ni, Debussy, and Brahms, and a
group of Swiss Folk Songs. Open
to the public.
Michigan Male Chorus Associa-
tion Annual Sing, sponsored by
the Lyra Male Chorus and the
(Continued on Page 5)

I0ER TI
TH EATRE
SUNDAY - MONDAY - TUESDAY
sROMANTKC RIOT :

Hillel Foundation Presents
Featuring Five Original Skits
PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
SUNDAY,.. APRIL 23 ... 7:45 P.M
Tickets $1.10 - $1.00 - 90c
Tickets on Sale
TODAY .. . 1-4 P.M. . . . League Lobby
Sunday at the door

MARILYN MAXWELLFRANKM4RPA
* Shown at 1:30 - 4:15 - 7:00 - 9:45 *
---PLUS -
"GIRL'S SCHOOL"
STARRING JOYCE REYNOLDS

e...®me

.e

loom

-I

..; WlVITNEY

STARTS TODAY
Thru Tues.
Mat. 30c Nights & Sun. 40c
Pius
1 A'

* 4
Because of a (oir...
WRAPPED IN VELVET
AND GUN-SMOKE!
Coming Sunday
BING CROSBY
in "Riding High"

ENDING TONIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M.
44c until 5 P.M.

Distracted, Pete??
NEVER!!

4b

I " RODOY MCDO L RIDERSofhe RANGEI
ADDED "UNDERSEA KINGDOM" Chapter 3
;
~ Now that SPRING is here ...
Bring the folks to
for an enjoyable
FAMILY SUNDAY DINNER
12:30-3:30
L ....o .-o > .----ac_-ro<->0 r- <> . <->0 <-><- 9

*

Also
Cartoon
Sport - News

===on

Ij

"I

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
Presents

I

OPPORTUNITY
Leading life insurance company
has unusual sales opportunity
for a College veteran seriously
looking for permanent career.
Immediate salary and commis-
sion, two years training pro-

"7DARING, SHOCKING FILM ..
DEAL.ING with FORBIDDEN T HEMES!
ALE OF ILLICIT LOVE- "C
* ~ -Sun orpeU D

f y I
err..--'' t
r ;
/ ,...
~ i"'

Thi jlniV~oladSon. h
razor's ic adveture in zes.11t:
'Fa ihse hOseairch outarnd

Donna Cady (Right) and Mary Taylor (Left)
give the Asosciate Editor of the 1950 ENSIAN,
Pete Craighead, the "BIinky Eye."

.
,

..

A T

I

Don't Worry about Distraction
I when you read

l 1 . -.

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