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April 22, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'M' Nine

Tops Minnesota, 6-2, In Conference Debut

'lI' Golfers Minus Veterans
In Triangular Meet Today

By HUGH QUINN
Michigan's golf team is in Col-
umbus today for a triangular meet
with Ohio State and North Texas
State Teachers - but without the
services of three veterans.
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer left
Co-Captain Chuck MacCallum,
Keith LeClair, and Leo Hauser in
Ann Arbor and took a squad com-
posed of four sophomores, a J-V
golfer, and Co-Captain Bob Olson
on the trip.
* * *
THE SWITCH is explained by
the fact that the three lettermen
who stayed home are familiar with
the course at Columbus, where
the Western Conference is to be
played next month. Katzenmeyer,
in pointing for a repeat win in the
Conference championships, wants
as many team members as possible
to play the course ahead of time.
The four sophomores who will
tee off for Michigan this after-
noon are Dean Lind, John Fra-
ser, Dick Evans, and Jim Dixon.
The first three made the South-
ern tour with the Wolverines
during spring vacation.
Mack Suprunowicz played in a
few matches last season, but he
has never been over the Ohio
State links.
* * *
NORTH TEXAS STATE, always
a power in collegiate golfing cir-
cles, threatens to be a tough op-
ponent today for the winless Wol-
verines. The Teachers are defend-
ing titlists in the National Collegi-
ate Athletic Associaton.
In two meets last year Ohio
and Michigan split. And today,
the man who iced the Buckeyes'
win last spring, Bob Rankin,
leads a team composed mostly of
inexperienced men.
The Texans, with several meets

BOB OLSON
. . . lone letterman
* * *
already under their belts this
year, figure on paper to win to-
day's meet, considering the lack
of experience on both the Ohio
and Michigan teams.
* * *
TEEING OFF in number one
for Michigan will probably be Ol-
son, the only veteran on the trip.
Lind or Evans will tee off second,
and from there down the order is
uncertain.
Michigan has a Southern trip
record this season of no wins, two
losses, and one tie.

Sailors Hold
Fifth Annual
'M' Regatta
Johns, O'Connor
SkipperDinghies
Weather permitting, the Fifth
Annual Michigan Invitational Re-
gatta, sponsored by the Michigan
Sailing Club, will take place today
and tomorrow at Whitmore Lake.
The meet will be the first one
for the tars, this semester. They
have been preparing for it ever
since February, holding shore
schools here on campus where
newcomers were taught the fun-
damentals of yachting.
* * *
NINE SCHOOLS have been in-
vited for the meet including In-
diana, Notre Dame, Wayne, Deni-
son, Northwestern University,
Purdue, Bradley, I.I.T. and Wash-
ington University.
Although sailing is not a
recognized inter-collegiate sport,
these groups manage to main-
tain themselves through their
own enthusiasm.
The students themselves sup-
port the activity financially by
their own contributions and work.
They have bought ther own boats
and keep them in sailing condi-
tion.
* * *
SINCE THIS past Wednesday,
eliminations have been held
among the members to pick the
two crews which will carry the,
Maize and Blue hopes.
Jim Johns and Gene O'Con-
nor won out and will sail in the
A and B divisions respectively.
Johns is Commodore of the
Michigan Sailing club and last
spring was named the top skip-
per in the Mid-West Sailing As-
sociation.
crewing for him while O'Connor
will be assisted by Bill Emrich.
ALL THE BOATS in the meet
are furnished by the Michigan
Sailing Club. They are D.T. (Dou-
ble Trouble) Dinghies. Every
school has a chance to use each of
them so that their will be no ad-
vantage from using better boats.
Points are awairded to the
competing schools in the Regat-
ta according to the following
system: One point for each boat
that starts, one point for each
boat that finishes and one point
for every boat they finish ahead
of.
Last year's meet was won by
Purdue while the Wolverines
breezed in third, one point behind
second place Bowling Green.

By KEN BIALKIN
Ed Grenkoski pitched and bat-
ted Michigan to a decisive 6-2 vic-
tory over the Gopher nine yester-
day at Ferry field before a chilled
but vociferous audience.
The Wolverines collected eleven
hits off Lloyd Lundeen, Minnesota
hurler, including three triples, two
All freshman golfers are re-
quested to report to the Univer-
sity golf course club house to-
day or tomorrow for freshman
team qualifying assignments.
-Rod Grambeau
of them off the big bat of Leo Ko-
ceski and the other by Grenkoski.
* * *
AFTER A SHAKY start, Mich-
igan's blond right-hander held the
Gophers scoreless for the last sev-
en innings and yielded no hits for
the last five frames. Grenkoski
seemed to grow stronger as the
game progressed, making ample
use of his fast ball and an occa-
sional curve.
The Gophers jumped off to a
one-run lead in the top of the
first inning when, with one out,
left fielder Tom Warner touched
Grenkoski for a single and took
second when Michigan center-
fielder Ralph Morrison bobbled
the ball. Warner scored on the
next play when Jim Holker poled
out a two base hit.
Minnesota increased its lead by
another run in the second inning,
taking advantage of a hit batter,
a Michigan error, a passed ball
and a base hit.
House Asks U'
To Keep Yideo
At GridTilts
LANSING-(A)-The House yes-
terday had before it a resolution
asking the University of Michi-
gan to continue television broad-
casts of its football games despite
a Big Ten ban.
Introduced by Rep. John F.
Fitzpatrick, Detroit Democrat, the
resolution pointedly declared that
many taxpayers who support the
University like to see the games
on television.
The resolution was sent to a
committee for study.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Nebraska 3, Luthera (Decorah,
Ia.) 2.
Michigan State 8, Purdue 5.
Illinois 4, Northwestern 0.
Maryland 14, Western Mary-
land 4.
Ohio University 1, Miami 0.

BUT AT THIS point the Gopher
scoring ended for the afternoon
and the Wolverine hitters took
over the situation. Pitcher Gren-
koski accounted for the first Mich-
igan tally when he smashed a long
triple to the right field corner,
driving in Bob Fancett who had
drawn a walk.
Michigan tallied again in the
third frame when Leo Koceski
blasted the first of his two trip-
les to left center field, and came
home on Captain Bob Wolff's
single.
The winning marker was scored
in the sixth inning. Palmer led off
with a single and was forced at
second by Wolff. Fancett then
slammed a base hit to right field
sending Wolff to third. A wild
throw to first base in an attempt
to nip Fancett enabled Wolff to
scurry home with what developed
into the winning run.
* * *
THE MAIZE AND BLUE'S power
exploded in the seventh inning
when they added on three more
runs to put the game in the bag.
An error by the Gopher shortstop
put Bill Bucholz on first.
This set the stage for Koces-
ki's second three base hit, scor-
ing Bucholz. Morrison then sin-
self on Palmer's hit to right field.
Yesterday's game was the first
of a two-game series with the Go-
phers. The second game will be
played this afternoon at 2 p.m. at
Ferry Field.
Coach Ray Fisher indicated that
Bob Hicks will go to the hill for!
the Wolverines while Dick Siebert's
choice to carry the Gopher hopes
will be Dale Engstrand.
.Box Score

Victors Collect Eleven
Hits In Big Ten Contest
Grenkowski Limits Gophers To Five Blows;
Two Koceski Triples Pace Winning Attack1

Tigers Rally
To Set Back
Chicago, 4-
Groth, Wertz Get
Timely Homers
By TED PAPES
special to The Daily
DETROIT-A shivering crowd
of 44,642 Motor City baseball fans
saw the Detroit Tigers success-
fully open their home season yes-!
terday by defeating the Chicago
White Sox, 4-1, at Briggs Stadium.
Home runs by outfielders John-
ny Groth and Vic Wertz enabled
the Bengals to come from behind.
and score all their runs in the
seventh and eighth innings.
* * *

By BOB VOKACf
Coach Don Canham entrained
with five of his ace relay men last
night for Lawrence, Kansas,
where the Wolverines will com-
pete in the Kansas Relays today.
Michigan will be -entering two
relay events-the distance medley
relay and the four mile relay.
* * *

Crack 'M' Relay Men Will
Compete In Kansas Today

CURRENTLY RATED as
* * *

the

BASEBALL ROUNDUP:
Dodgers Beat Giants 8-1;
Bosox, Yanks, Bucks Win

VIRGIL TRUCKS, making hisE
first start of the season for De-
troit, went all the way and allow-
ed only five Chicago hits. He fan-
ned five and issued three bases
on balls. Mickey Haefner pitched'
the entire game for the losers.
The Sox' little left-hander
coasted through the first six
frames, limiting the Tigers to a
double by third baseman George
Kell in the first, another two-
bagger by Johnny Lipon in thet
third, and Gerry Priddy's sixth
inning single. He was twirling
behind a one run lead, which
his mates had given him in the
fourth.
With one out in the last half of
the seventh, Groth gave the chil-
ly throng the first chance to cheer
when he blasted a three-and-two
pitch over the barrier at the 365
foot mark in left-center field,
pulling his team up into a 1-1
deadlock.
* *, *
AFTER SETTING the White
Sox down in order in their half of
the eighth,gTrucks opened the
winning Tiger rally with a long
double off the screen in left field.
It looked as if he might be strand-
ed there as Lipon flied to center
and Priddy was thrown out by
Haefner.
The Chicago board of strategy
then elected to give Kell an in-
tentional walk with the left-
handed Wertz batting next.
Wertz added the coup de grace
with a towering drive which
bounded off the railing of the
second deck in right field.
The lone White Sox tally ma-
terialized after a momentary lapse
in the Detroit defense. Michaels
walked to open the fourth. Big
Gus Zernial slapped a bounder
straight at Kell who juggled it and
recovered in time to force Michaels
at second, but the relay to first was
a step too late to double the batter.
Hank Majeski followed with a dou-
ble to right-center, scoring Zer-
nial.
Michael and Majeski each hit
two safe blows for Chicago. The
Tiger hits were distributed even-
ly among six men.

f best collegiate distance medley re-
lay team in the nation, the Maize
and Blue quartet of Art Henrie,
Chuck Whitaker, Jus Williams and
Don McEwen will be out to better
their Southern Relay time of
10:14.5.

Aaron Gordon will replace
Henrie in the above quartet for
the four mile relay event. Whit-
aker is slated for the first leg of
the four mile grind, with Gor-
don, Williams and McEwen fol-
lowing in that order.
By recording the 10:14.5 time
at the Southern Relays, Michi-
gan's distance medley relay team'
jumped into the lead of outdoor
competition in this event. The cur-
rent American outdoor record of
9:59.4 in the distance medley was
posted by a North Texas State
Teachers College team paced by
the Rideout brothers at the Penn
Relays in 1938.
* * *
MICHIGAN GAINED national
prominence in the distance med-
ley relay at the Illinois Tech Re-
lays at the close of the indoor sea-
son last March. The team of Don
McEwen, Aaron Gordon, Jus Wil-
liams and Jim Ackerman clocked
a 10:11.6 time, just one and three-
tenths seconds shy of the current
American indoor record of 10:10.3
Since Michigan's four mile re-
lay team will be going into the
Kansas Relays today with little
previous experience, Coach Can-
ham feels the competition will
be a good warm-up 'for the.
Drake Relays next weekend.
The outdoor Varsity record in
the four mile event for the Maize
and Blue of 17:37 was recorded in
1941. Indiana established the
American record of 17:16.1 in 1937
while Sweden annexed the world's
record of 17:2.8 in 1941.
Today's meet will be the second
outdoor meet the Wolverines will
have competed in so far this sea-
son, the . first meet being the
Southern Relaysat Birmingham,
Ala., two weeks ago.

CHUCK WHITAKER
... one of four

BROOKLYN-(P)-Roy Camp-
anella's grand slam home run pac-
ed a 14-hit Brooklyn attack as the
National League Champions open-
ed their home season yesterday
with an 8-1 trouncing of the for-
lorn New York Giants.
The big negro catcher unloaded
the bases in the third inning when
he parked one of Dave Koslo's
southpaw shoots beyond the 390-
foot mark in deep left center
field.
Only 24,033 paid their way in-
to the Ebbets Field inaugural,
in which every Dodger except
* pitcher Preacher Roe slammed
at least one hit off three Giant
flingers. Rookie Bob Morgan col-
lected three, all singles.
Jackie Robinson received a sil-
ver bat from President Ford Frick
of the National League for having
led the loop in batting last sea-
son and then proceeded to slug
three runs across with a triple
and a double. Jim Russell ac-
counted for the other Dodger score
with a home run off Koslo in the
third, shortly before Campanella
connected.
The veteran Roe, making his
first start of the campaign, really
hung the Giants out to dry. He
had a four-hit shutout going into
the sixth, when successive singles
by Bobby Thomson, Don Mueller
k and Hawk Thompson gave the
Polo Grounders their lone run.
RED SOX 8 PHILADELPHIA 2
PHILADELPHIA - (A') - Man-
ager Joe McCarthy of the Boston
Red Sox received a 63rd birthday
present and Connie Mack a disap-
pointing start to his 50th home
season as manager of the Phila-
delpha Athletics yesterday as the
Red Sox whipped the A's 8 to2.
Boston's lefty Maurice McDer-
mott, hurling seven hit ball, was
particularly tough in the clutch.
Vern Stephens blasted a grand
slam homer and Al (Zeke) Za-
rilla smashed out three hits in
the Boston victory over lefty
Lou Brissie and Harry Byrd.
Dom DiMaggio and -Tom 0'-
Brien, the latter playing in left
field in the absence of Ted Wil-
liams who was left in Boston with
a severe attack of the grippe, each
had two hits for the winning
Sox.
* * *
NEW YORK 14 WASHINGTON 7
NEW YORK-(AP)-The World
Champion New York Yankees cel-
Phrnvpr, tcd hpir homy~ inn uial ves- O~

commit four balks. Byrne, who
opened for the Yankees, allow-
ed only five hits until he was
pulled in the seventh inning,
but was guilty of handing out
11 passes. Three of his walks,
together with three Washington
singles, led to a five-run round
that enabled the Nats to gain
a short-lived 7-7 tie.
That was as far as the Sena-
tors got. Joe Page, the Yankees'
brilliant relief ace, took over at
this point and stopped cold. Mic-
key Harris, Washington's left-
hander, tried to emulate Page, but
succeeded only in putting all four
men he faced on base. Relieving
Lloyd Hittle in the bottom half of
the seventh, Harris walked Hen-
rich then served a home run call
to Di Maggio. That broke the tie
and put the Yankees in front, 9-7.
Henrich blasted his in the eighth
to set off a four-run outburst.
Page alowed only one hit in two
and two-thirds innings to receive
credit for his first victory of the
season.
* * *
PITTSBURG 7 CINCINNATTI 5
PITTSBURGH-UP)-Ralph Ki-
ner belted his first 1950 home run
yesterday to help pound the Pitts-
burgh Pirates to a 7-5 victory
over the Cincinnati Reds at Forbes
Field.
But fellow Buc outfielder Wally
Westlake stole the show before
32,685 frost-nipped fans by per-
sonally driving in six tallies with
a pair of four baggers and a sin-
ble-.
The Reds' Bobby Usher and
Danny Litwhiler joined the
homer parade too-each rap-
ping a 400-foot drive over the
center field wall.
Kiner thus negotiated the first
step in what he hopes will be the
long climb past Babe Ruth's all-
time record of 60 homers in a sea-
son.
BOSTON 2 PHILADELPHIA 2
BOSTON-(/P)-An eighth-in-
ning thunder shower halted the
Boston Braves' home opener after
they had pulled in a 2-2 tie with
the Philadelphi Phillies yesterday
before a chilled 7,308 crowd.
The Phils bunched four of their
seven hits against Vern Bickford
in the first inning for both of their
runs. Then the Tribesmen, held
to five hits, each registered single
tallies against lefty Ken Heintzel-
man in the second and fifth
frames.
Time was called with the hom

MICHIGANp
Bucholz 2b
Koceski lb
Morrison of
Morrill lb
Palmer c
Wolff ss
Fancett rf
Dorr 3b
Grenkowski p
TOTALS
MINNESOTA
Gostic c
Warner If
Holker ss
Baglien cf
Kranz lb
Myklebust rf
Groumann 3b
Anderson 2b
Lundeen p
(a) Olson

AB
5
3
5
4
3
4
3
3
4

R
1
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
4

H
0
2
2
0
2
1
2
1
1

0
1
5
2
10
5
1
3
0
0

34 6 27 4

E
0
1
0
0
2
0
1
0
11
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

A
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
2
5
11
3
0
1
0
0
1
0
5
0
0
10

v

3
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
3
1

0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2

Rain May Bring Damage
To M' Track Fortunes

0
1
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
5

5
0
1
2
8
1
2
4
1
0
24

r
E
x
Z
1
7
T
a
1
5
r
Z
Y
r
i
r
e
z
e

Big Ten
Baseball
Standings

TOTALS 34

(a) batted for Lundeen in ninth

TEAM
Indiana
Wisconsin
MICHIGAN
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Ohio State
Northwestern
Purdue

W
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
0
1
2
2
2
1
0

Pct.
1.000
1.000
1.000
.667
.333
.333
.333
.000
.000

ALL THE BATS JOIN IN:
I MSpring Softball Competition Starts

By GEORGE FLINT
With the beginning of the "big
push" for Don Canham's track-
men only a week away, the Ferry'
Field cinders have been the scene
of a lot of furious activity and a
few rather serious worries this
past week.
Canham's men need that activi-
ty, because the short-lived out-
door season should include some
of the most rugged competition
in years.
BUT THEY certainly wish they
didn't have those worries, which
center mostly about the weather.
While New York City is crying for
rain, the Wolverine cindermen are
waiting for the sunrise with a
considerable amount of eagerness,
because outdoor workouts are very
nearly a must at this late date.
The problem which presents
itself concurrently with getting
out on the Fery Field oval is
mainly one of muscles and ten-
dons. With this week's change-
able weather, Coach Canham
been faced with the possibility
of charley horses and pulled
tendons, particularly to his
sprinters.
So far the Wolverines have es-
caped any serious injuries but the
dilemma still presents itself. They
wouldn't welcome the type of in-
jury that hampered Art Henrie
during last year's outdoor season.
. *Tk
THlE SPRINTERS look to be of

'MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS

AMERICAN

TEAM
Detroit
St. Louis
New York
Boston
Washington
Philadelphia
Cleveland
Chicago

W
3
2
3
2
1
1
0
0

LEAGUE
L Pct.
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .750
2 .500
2 .333
2 .333
2 .000
3 .000
LEAGUE
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .750
1 .667
1 .500
3 .250
2 .000
3 .000
*

GB
1/z
2
2
2'/
3
1
2
2
2

The Intra-Mural spring athle-
tic program got off to a fast break
from the barrier of spring recess
with the opening of softball com-
petition this week Tong with the
finals in codeball.
Despite stiff breezes and muddy
grounds the social fraternities
opened their spring softball slate
Wednesday with eight contests be-
ing played.
* * *
DELTA CHI WHITEWASHED
Alpha Phi Alpha 11-0 and Phi
Sigma Delta performed the same
feat over Phi Delta Theta by the
score of 6-0 in the only shutouts
of the days.
In the closest contest of the
day Zeta Beta Tau nipped Phi
Kappa Sigma 9-8.
Other games saw Chi Psi whip-
ping Omega Psi Phi 11-5, Kappa
Sigma downing Alpha Tau Omega
5-1. Sigma Alpha Epsilon took it
on the chin from Tau Kappa Ep-
silon 10-5, and Pi Lambda Phi
stopped Alpha Epsilon Phi 5-2. In
the final tilt Delta Tau Delta tied
Chi Phi 3-3.
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITY
softball got under way with three
games played on Ferry Field.
There was to have been a
fourth contest, between the Law
Club and Phi Delta Chi, but the
Lawyers won on a forfeit when
the latter neglected t o g o
through the formality of ap-
pearing.

seasons this Monday at Ferry
Field.
Fletcher of League A, and An-
derson of League C were not sche-
duled for games this week.
IN LEAGUE A, Winchell and
Lloyd trimmed Allen-Rumsey and
Chicago, 6-3, and 13-5, rsepective-
ly. Adams and Williams took the
Independent team managers
desiring entries in horseshoes,
tennis, and golf must contact
the Intra-Mural office before
April 27th.
-Bill Tomko
lead in League B by defeating
Wenley and Michigan 9-4, and
11-2.
Greene and Cooley had little
trouble in disposing of Hayden
and Hinsdale 20-5, and 12-4 in
League C tilts. Two lopsided con-
tests in League D saw Tyler
slaughtering Strauss 19-1, and
Prescott overpowering Vaughn
19-1.
In the finals of the All-Campus
codeball tournament the team of
Jim' Hartman and Dom Domke
beat the combination. of Leo Van-
derKuy and Carl Kreger, 11-5,
8-11, 11-2. All four are varsity
lettermen in diving-football, bas-

ketball, and football, respective-
ly.
* * *
IN THE FIRST GAME Hartman
and Domke paced the way to an
11-5 victory. VanderKuy and Kre-
ger fought their way back in the
second game, 11-8, to force the
play into a third game. In the fi-
nale VanderKuy and Kreger prov-
ed no match as the victors poured
on an 11-2 win to take the title.
Codeball is very similar to a
combination of soccer and hand-
ball. The game is played with an
inflated rubber ball the size of a
regulation softball. Players are al-
lowed to kick the ball, but not to
touch it with any other part of
their body. Choice is given of hit-
ting the ball on either no bounces,
one, or two bounces.
The game was thought up by Dr.
Code, a graduate of Michigan and
resident of Ann Arbor.

particular importance in Canham's
conference Ineet plans. The" 6n-
sensus of opinion seems to be that
the Maize and Blue will be stronger
in the dash events outdoors than
they were indoors, and this could
mean the difference between the
second-place they garnered in the
Indoor Meet and their hoped-for
win up at Evanston May 27.
Though Ohio State will also be
stronger, the Maize and Blue are
counting on a slightly better show-
ing in the sprints, (the 440' in-
cluded) and the nile relay to
break up the Buckeye dominance.
ef
IN THE
U. S. AI R FORCE
AU.S. Air Force intervewin
college men between the ages
of 20 and 26w.
Date: April 26, 27, 28
pTime: 8:0 AI-4:30 P.M.
Dlate:Nrtlt27,

LATE COLLEGE SCORES

St. Louis University 6, University
of Detroit 0.
Alabama 6, Miss. State 3.
Wisconsin 11, Ohio State 5
Wheaton (Ill.) 2, University of
Chicago 0.

NATIONAL
Boston 2
Chicago 2
Pittsburgh 2
Brooklyn 2
Philadelphia 1
St. Louis 1
Cincinnati 0
New York 0
* *

NEW YORK - (P) -Probable
pitchers for tomorrow's major lea-
gue games (last year's won and
lost records in parentheses).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
St. Louis at Chicago-Staley (10-
10) vs Voiselle (7-8)
New York at Brooklyn-Kennedy
(12-14) vs Bankhead (0-0)

SIGMA ALPHA MU
presents4
"THIS TIME IT'S MUSIC"
or
"The Dance of the white Bucks"

TYPEWRITERS
e~ wEhE_,

I

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