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March 29, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

name

Old

Story

- City

College,

I,

Bradley, 68

IN TITLE DEFENSE:
Fisher Builds '50 Team
Around Veteran Hurlers

Beavers First to Sweep
NIT, NCAA Tourneys
Wolfpack Overcomes Baylor in Consolation
Game, 53-41, as Ranzino Scores 21 Points

MISERIES OF MANN:
Natators eakened by Graduation of Four Top

F I

By BOB SANDELL
Coach Ray Fisher is apparently
unconcerned over the fact that
he has no outstanding southpaw
pitching prospects on his Wolver-
ine diamond squad this spring.
Contrary to the popular base-
ball adage that a right-handed
pitcher has an advantage over a
right-handed batter and ditto for
the lefties, Ray feels it's not too
important which side his hurlers
throw from.
THIS IS assuming, of course,
that his righthanders are capable'
moundsmen and have the stuff to
handle either type of hitter.
Three returning lettermen,
all righthanders, form the nu-
cleus around which Fisher must
build a mound staff to defend
the Conference title shared last
year with Indiana and Iowa.
He has a fair idea of what those
three, Eddie Grenkoski, Bob Hicks,
and Dave Settle, are capable of
doing; but as yet the newcomers
are still pretty much of an un-
known quantity.
HICKS AND Grenkoski both
had 2-0 records in Western Con-
ASPORTtS
BILL CONNOLLY, Night Editor
ference competition last year, but
were used mainly in relief roles.
Grenkoski turned in one ex-
ceptional performance, an indi-
cation of what kind of a pitch-
er he could possibly turn into.
It was in the second game with
Illinois and in the fourth inning
the Wolverines found themselves
with the Illini threatening to
lengthen the margin.

AT THIS POINT Fisher sent in
his sophomore unknown and Ed-
die responded by blanking the vis-
itors the rest of the way on three
hits. Included in the performance
were eight strikeouts.

i

It was an important contest
too, since Michigan finally won
the game, 8-6, to topple the Illi-
ni fropm first place in the
standings, and go on unbeaten
the rest of the way.
Eddie never reached that form
again in the weeks that followed,
but Fisher has high hopes he
might this year.
HICKS IS A lanky six footer
who hasn't been too successful in
starting roles, but did turn in

Spring football practice will
open next Monday, April 3.
Candidates may obtain their
equipment at the Field House
today and continuing through
the week from 2 to 5 p.m. daily.
Bennie Oosterbaan
some capable relief chucking.
Settle's best performance was
a four hit shutout against the
University of Detroit. He saw
some conference action as a re-
liefer, but had no decisions.
Fisher expects to use Bob Fan-
cett, a senior, as -both a pitcher
and an outfielder. Bob hurled
some in his sophomore year but
was bothered with a sore arm
last year.
The veteran Michigan coach
still thinks he might have some
good talent among the first year
men, but can't tell much until the
team can move outside.
Al Virgona of Detroit is one of
the better sophomore prospects,
along with Bob Carpenter of
Scarsdale, N.Y., Dick Bogard of
Peoria, Illinois, and Bob Larson
of Iron Mountain.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Norman Mager,
wearing an ugly two-inch gash
over his left eye, scored a driving
layup goal in the last ten seconds
last night to give City College of
New York a 7168 victory ve
Bradley for the NCAA champion-
ship and basketball's first "grand
slam."
The climactic goal, coming with
18,000 Madison Square fans or
their tiptoes and roaring at full
lung strength, gave a story book
Winnus Lose
ough Playoff
Opener,_5-0
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-A hard-hitting Tor-
onto Maple Leafs team opened its
quest for a fourth straight Stan-
ley Cup Championship by humb-
ling the National Hockey League
Champion Detroit Red Wings, 5-0
last night before 13,659 fans.
The rough game was the opener
of semi-final series "A" with the
coveted Stanley Cup as the ulti-
mate goal. New York and Mon-
treal, the other semi-finalists,
open their series tomorrow night.
IT WAS the 12th consecutive
time that the Toronto club had
beaten ttie Wings in playoff game,
but seldom did they have things
as much their own way as they
did last night.
The Leafs won the Stanley
Cup the last two seasons by
beating the Detroiters four
Howe Serious
DETROIT-(,P)-Dr. C. L.
Tomsu, Red Wing tedm physi-
cian who supervised the re-
moval of wingman Gordie Howe
to the hospital last night is-
sued this report:
"Gordie has a deep cut in his
right eyeball, a fractured nose,
a possible fractured cheekbone
and a possible fractured skull.
We won't know the full extent
of his injuries until we see the
x-rays."
straight in the finals and they
kept up that jinx last night.
Twenty-one penalties, four of
them majors and another a mis-
conduct, were called in the bruis-
ing battle that saw Detroiter Gor-
die Howe wind up in Harper Hos-
pital.
He was injured in a collision
with Toronto's Ted Kennedy in
the third period.
TORONTO broke the game wide
open with a three goal surge in
the second period after the initial
20-minute session was scoreless.
Joe Klukay tallied first with a 10-
foot side angle shot at the second
mark.
The story of the game was in
the harder checking by the Tor-
onto club which hit hard and of-
ten. The Leafs gave their goalie
Turk Broda a fairly easy night as
he had 21 saves, only four of them
tough ones. Detroit's Harry Lum-
ley had 26, eight of which were
on hard shots.

finish to one of the most amazing
sagas of college basketball.
UNRANKED and unnoticed, Nat
Holman's cinderella team came
out of nowhere two weeks ago to
start mowing down the nation's
top quintets with\ unbelievable
regularity.
Ten days ago they whipped
this same Bradley team, No. 1
in the nation's rankings, for the
National Invitation crown, 69-
61.
No team before now has ever
been able to cram the two big
national tournament titles into a
single season.
NORTH Carolina State won
third place in the consolation
bracket by defeating Baylor, 53-
41.
Held to a single point through
the first 20 minutes, NC State's
Sam Ranzino found himself after
intermission and sparked a late
rally by the Southern Conference
Champions.
He wound up with 21 points.
THREE minutes before the end
of the first half of the featured
game, Mager, a rangy substitute,
was sent sprawling to the floor
after a head-on collision with
Aaron Preece of Bradley.
Preece rose to his feet and
was able to continue after some
on-the-spot attention. But Ma-
ger, a two-inch gash pouring
blood over his left eye, had to
be led to the locker room for
medical attention.
There he had five stitches tak-
in in the wound. He reported for
action at the start of the second
half and the crowd gave him a
loud tribute.
BUT not so loud as when he
stole the ball in the fading seconds
and tore down the floor to cash in
the final bucket.
At that time the score was
69-68, CCNY leading, and Brad-
ley a growing threat to snatch
the verdict out of the fire in a
bold finish.
City College apparently had
clinched things without a doubt
with less than a minute left but
Bradley wasn't ready to give up
the ghost just yet, as they trailed
69-64.
Little Gene Melchiorre, a thorn
in the CCNY hide in both tourna-
ments, came through with two
quick driving layups to haul his
mates to within a point of the
front-running Beavers.
TRAILING by seven points 55-
62 and with their All-America
forward, Paul Unruh, on the
bench because of excessive fouls,
Bradley roared back to a hair's
breadth of the Beavers on Ml-
chiorre's two great shots.
With the count 69-68, CCNY,
Bradley gained possession of the
ball and tore up the floor while
the clock ticked off the final
seconds.
Melchiorre, the five-foot-eight
and a half inch pivot star, dubbed
the "Midget Mikan," made a fling
at the basket but the shot wa
blocked. Seconds later Mager
made his clinching drive.

CHARLIE MOSS
... major loss
Basketball's
'Man of Year'
Seeks Change
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Kansas' Forrest
C. (Phog) Allen accepted the
award as "Basketball's Man of the
Year" yesterday and renewed his
plea that the sport get rid of its
"hysteria".
Taking the rostrum to receive
the honor votedhim by the Na-
tional Association of Basketball
Coaches, the 66-year-old pioneer
teacher declared:
"We now have a game that's
impossible to officiate and almost
impossible to play properly. It's
all pass and run. It's mass hys-
teria."
ALLEN, a coach for 40 years
with 32 of them at Kansas, re-
commended two major rules
changes which he said- would
bring back some stabilization to
Dr. James Naismith's brainchild.
They are:
1. Return of the center jump
on a rotating basis.
2. Make the present two-min-
ute rule prevail for the entire
game.
"We ruined basketball when
we took, away the center jump."
he declared. "Let's bring back the
jump but put it on a rotating ba-
sis.
THAT IS, a coach would have
to give a jumping order to the of-
ficials before every game, just as
baseball managers do. After each
field goal a different player
would jumpafor each side. Of
course, there could be no substi-
tion for a player whose turn it is
to jump' next.
"I think also we need sterner
measures to discourage foul-
ing so I would make the present
two-minute rule a 40-minute
rule."
He has been a member of the
National Rules Committee for 13
years.

By GEORGE FLINT
Any coach looks with regret upon the departure of seasoned vet-
erans from the collegiate athletic scene-particularly if they've been
his most deoendable point-producers for three seasons.
SUch must be the feeling of Matt Mann, Michigan's tireless swim-
ming coach, as he surveys the prospect of losing four men who have
been constant insurance for tank success.
THE QUARTET - GUS STAGER, Charlie Moss, Dave Tittle, and
captain Matt Mann III-were responsible for nearly all the Maize
and Blue point production in the recent NCAA meet at Columbus.
And it's been much the same story for three years. Stager, the blond-
haired middle distance man from New Jersey, was in the "always a
bridesmaid but never a bride" category as far as national meets were
concerned. But that didn't detract a whit from his swimming suc-
cess. His ability to go equally well at 220 yards, 440 yards, or 1500
meters meant more to the Wolverines than if he'd been a cinch first-
place winner in only one event.
Moss, the versatile West Virginia splasher, won both the 100-
yard breaststroke and 150-yard individual medley in the con-
ference meet this year, and was probably the strongest sprint
man the Wolverines could call on for relay duty.
Charlie set a pool record for the century breaststroke at the Big
Ten Meet, a smooth 1-minute flat effort.
DAVE TITTLE, a member of the medley relay team which set an
NCAA record in 1948, has been a consistent performer on free style
and medley teams since. In the 100 he's been around the 52-second
mark all season, from a relay start.
Rounding out the quartet, Matt Mann III has been more than
the usual coach's son-he was Big Ten 1500-meter champion in 1948,
and the 220-yard free style winner this year.
Mann had top marks of 4:48 in the 440, 2:09 in the 220, and
19:43 in the 1500 meters, and could be called on as a sprinter for re-
lay duty.
His versatility was demonstrated this year by his presence on
the 400-yard free style team that was second in NCAA competition.
Mann had a 52.1 mark for his century in that event.

AP SPORT FLASHES

I.

REDS, 12-TIGERS, 7
LAKELAND, FLA,-The Cin-
cinnati Reds marked up their
sixth straight triumph by taking
an easy 12 to 7 decision from the
Detroit Tigers in an exhibition
contest here yesterday.
The Reds belted out 18 hits in-
cluding three homers while the
Tigers were held to eight safeties
by Ewell Blackwell and Johnny
Hetki.
BRAVES, 9-YANKS, 5
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.-The
New York Yankees suffered their
fifth straight defeat in the grape-
fruit belt yesterday as they bowed
to the Boston Braves 9 to 5.
INDIANS, 4-GIANTS, 2
PHOENIX, ARIZ.-The Cleve-
land Indians pushed over three
runs in the last two innings here
yesterday to defeat the New York
Giants 4 to 2.
ATHLETICS, 8-TORONTO, 7
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA.-
With second stringers playing the
entire game, the Philadelphia Ath-
letics nosed out the Toronto Maple
Leafs of the International League
8-7 in an exhibition game yester-
day.
DODGERS, 5-ST. PAUL, 4
VERO BEACH, FLA.-Although
two Brooklyn pitchers made three
balks and gave seven bases on
balls the Dodgers today pulled out
a 5-4 victory over St. Paul of the
American Association.
BIRMINGHAM, 12-NATS, 11
ORLANDO, FLA. - The Bir-
mingham Barons of the Southern
Association spotted Washington
nine runs and came from behind
to topple the Nats 12-11 here
yesterday in a game called at the

end of the sixth inning because
rain.

of

Two grand slam homers, one by
senterfielder Dick Burgett and
;he game-clinching blow by left-
fielder Ed Lavigne turned the
trick. Both came off Diz Suther-
.and, the losing pitcher whe re-
placed Sid Hudson in the fifth.
* * *
CUBS, 4-PIRATES, 0
SAN BERNARDINO, CAL. -
Southpaw Johnny Schmitz of the
Chicago Cubs shut out the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, 4-0, on eight hits#
today.
It was the Bucs' sixth straight
defeat.
PHILLIES, 21-CARDS, 6
CLEARWATER, FLA. - The
Philadelphia Phillies pounded out
14 hits, including two home runs,
and received 15 base on balls as
they whipped the St. Louis Card-
inals 21-6 in an exhibition game
here yesterday.

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