100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 29, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 1958

I I ~t
I.

Mumm

Doctor Hits
Socialization
Of Britain
A trial program of socialized
medicine-or any other plan of
the welfare state-can only end
in complete nationalization and
absolute government control of
private property, Dr. Geoffrey
Myers, an English surgeon, warn-
ed last night.
Lecturing at a meeting of the
Washtenaw County Medical So-
ciety, Dr. Myers, consulting sur-
geon of West Cornwall Hospital
in Penzance, England, charged
that a "bureaucratic" welfare
state in any country separates
people from the wealth of their
country.
* * *
"WHEN the individual no long-
er has control over his private
property in the 'property-less'
welfare state, it then creates a
real need for welfare," Dr. Myers
said.
As an example, Dr. Myers said
, that when a national health
"scheme" was first given to the
British people in 1911, no one
thought that medicine would
Ibecome a state monopoly.
"But the British people have
been taken for a ride, forced into
collectivism, and are now govern-
ed by a stereotyped formula de-
vised by others than ourselves."
DR. MYERS claimed that state
contrl of medicine by the Bri-
tish gbvernment has:
1. Removed ownership of pri-
vate practice from doctors.
2. Destroyed hospital autonomy,
and forced the control of as many
as 200 widely-distributed hospi-
tals under one regional board.
3. Created an "army of snoop-
ers" upon whose aid the socialist
government depends.
4. Caused a breakdown of im-
portant confidential relationships
between the doctor and his pa-
tient.
Dr. Myers asserted that in
spite of the National Medicine
Service in Britain, "all doctors
are treated alike, but the good
ones are dragged down while
the bad are lifted up."
Dr. Myers said that other coun-
tries must remember that "social-
ism as a form of government does
not depend on a socialist govern-
ment, but a general welfare con-
cept forced on the people by
psuedo-intellectuals."
* 'I *
"IN BRITAIN, the welfare state
has been pushed to the fore-front
during the last 40 years by lib-
erals, and not by the socialist gov-
ernment that came into power
four years ago."
Health Parley
To MeetT'od ay
More than 200 industrial sur-
geons and doctors from all parts
of Michigan will meet on the cam-
pus today to hold three meetings
on problems of industrial health.
The morning and afternoon ses-
sions, beginning at 9 a.m. and 2
p.m., will be held at the School of
Public Health. The evening meet-
ing will be held in a local hotel,
beginning at 6 p.m.
The conference is part of a
state-wide celebrationetoday of
Michigan Industrial Health Day.

-Daily-Alan Reid
COLD SHOULDER-Given a kingdom for the affection they have
shown the king (John Sargent), his two daughters Regan (Ann
Husselman) and Goneril (Joyce Atchison) drive Lear from his
castle in "King Lear," opening a four-night run at 8 p.m. in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Swords Flash, Hears Break
As 'ing L. 'Oen oih

House lights will dim at 8 p.m.
as the curtain goes up on Shakes-
peare's "King Lear," opening a
four night run today at Lydia
Mendelssohn. w
Critics consider the play to be
the most calamitous of the Bard's
works since eleven of the feature
characters are killed or wounded
by flashing swords, broken hearts
and eye-gouging.
*. * *
THE MAIN plot revolves about
old King Lear's decision to divvy
up his kingdom among his three
daughters according to their feel-
ings toward the old man, but with
one catch-they must express
their love publicly. Favorite daugh-
ter Cordelia, proud as the old king,
refuses. Lear cuts her off without
a shilling.
Lear is M)adly treated in his
retirement-so badly treated
that he runs off. Just as faith-
French Club
Will Present
Pu getComedy1
"One of the finest psychological
studies of modern French youth"
is the way Prof. Charles Koella, of
the romance language department,
described the forthcoming Cercle
Francais' production, "Les Jours
Heureux," under his direction.
The French Club's 44th annual
presentation-a three-act comedy
by Claude-Andre Puget-is slated
for 8 p.m. Monday at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
* * *
"THE HAPPY DAYS" studies
closely five young people, ranging
in age from 16 to 29 years, whose
parents leave them alone in a
country home for 24 hours.
With no parental supervision,
the characters act and react spon-
taneously, speak colorfully and
carry on petty bickerings in an at-
mosphere of gay nonchalance,
Prof. Koella explained.
Starring are Owen Loveless,
Grad, as the aviator; J. Warren
Bunyan, '50, as Bernard Gassin;
Arthur Hanson, jr., '51, as Olivier
Laprade; Patricia Sly, jr., '51, in
the role of Pernette Laprade; Er-
nestine Masters, '50, as Marianne
Gassin and Judith Raub, '51, as
Francine Gassin.
Tickets for the play cost 75
cents, and may be purchased from
2 to 5 p.m. Saturday or from 2
to 8 p.m. Monday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn box office. All seats
will be reserved.

ful daughter Cordelia is about
to save the old man from his
wanderings, she is killed.
Parallel to this tragedy is the
dirty work of Edmond, bastard
son of an Earl named Gloucester
who leads his father to believe his
second son, Edgar, is trying to kill
him. Glouchester disowns Edgar.
Wicked Edmond has his father
blinded and thrown out of the
castle.
IRASCIBLE old King Lear will
be acted by John Sargent '50; the
Earl of Kent, loyal adviser to the
king, by Warren Pickett, Grad;
Regan and Goneril, two not-so-
favorite daughters of the king, by
Ann Husselman '50 and Joyce
Atchison '50.
Cardelia, the king's faithful
daughter will be played by Mari-
lyn Begole, '50; Gloucester by
Ted Heusel, Grad. and the fool
by Arthur Flemings, Grad.
Set designs for "King Lear" are
by George Crepeau with Barbara
Hamel supervising costumes. The
entire production is under the
direction of Prof. William P. Hal-
stead.
TICKETS for the four evening
performances may be obtained
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and at
showtime at the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn box office or reserved by
calling 6300.
Dental Faculty
osition Given
no Ramfjord
Dr. Sigurd Ramfjord of Oslo,'
'INorway, has been appointed to
the faculty of the School of Dent-
istry, for the 1950-51 academic
year according to-Dean Russell
W. Bunting of dental school.
Dr. Ramfjord took his post-
graduate training in peridontia
at the University, where he served
as a clinical instructor from 1948
to 1949.
Currently he is teaching post-
graduate courses in Norway.
B-oyd-o Lecture
Charles E. Boyd, assistant sec-
retary of the Detroit Board of
Commerce and President of the
American Trade Association Exe-
cutives, will discuss the "Commer-
cial Activities of Chambers of
Commerce" in Business Adminis-
tration classes today, in the first
of a series of three lectures.
~ - -

New Quad
To Relieve
Congestion
Completion of the South Quad-
rangle next February will permit
a "substantial reduction in the
number of men doubling and trip-
ling up in the West and East
Quadrangles," Francis Shiel, resi-
dent hall business manager, an-
nounced yesterday.
But at the same time Shiel ad-
:nitted that quad crowding would
aot be completely eliminated by
he move.
'* * *
AS A RESULT of the heavy
-ostwar enrollments, all double
rooms in the quads have been
zonverted to triples, while all
ingles have had two men in them.
Exactly how far the reduction
will go, Shiel said, would not be
known until next February. At
that time the remaining over-
flow of students will be put in
rooms "which will lend them-
selves best to a second or a
third person," he explained.
But, Shiel declared, there would
iefinitely be no doubling or trip-
ing up in the South Quad at any
ime.
* * *
THE DORM crowding problem
>egan during the war, which
>rought with it increased female
nrollment and extensive training
;ourses conducted by the armed
.ervices.
The overcrowding in women's
dorms was eliminated last year
with the completion of Alice
Lloyd Hall.
But the situation still persisted
in the men's dorms. At the begin-
aing of this semester the two quads
were housing about 1,350 men
each. They had originally been de-
signed for some 925 men apiece.
Swim Team
Falls Victim
To Ukulele-itis
Natators Find Uke
Big Help in Wooing
The Michigan swimming team
owes a great deal to a long-un-
recognized Portugese inventor, Sal-
vatore Munez.
Back in the era before radio
and Arthur Godfrey, Senor Munez
put together cat-gut strings and
a sounding box to make the 'first
ukulele. This little instrument,
whose name comes from Hawaiian
words meaning "jumping flea" has
twanged its way into the heart
of the American public.
The swimming team is the prize
Ann Arbor example of ukulele-itis.
* * *
MEMBERS OF THE team were
unaware of the beauties of Senor
Munez' invention until their
Christmas vacation visit to the
sunny sands of Florida. Anxious
to make the best possible impres-
sion on the denizens of that orange
bedecked state, they were quite
chagrined to notice that the boys
from Ohio State seemed to make
much better time than they did.
The Ohio secret soon was out.
The ukulele had come to Colum-
bis with the influx of students
from Hawaii. Since fair ladies
everywhere seem to be equally
susceptible to the combination
of moonlight and "uke" music,
the men of the scarlet and grey,

each equipped with a ukulele,
had proved irresistable.
Alert Michiganders were not far
behind, and soon both teams were
wooing in the Florida nights with
the gentle strumming of ukuleles.
"It's so easy to play," diver George
Eyster explained, "all you have
to do is hit it once and then sing."
* * *
OTHER ANN Arborites have fal-
len victim to the lulling strains
of "uke" music. "We used to sell
about six a year," one local mer-
chant declared, "but business has
boomed up to one a week now that
Arthur Godfrey is twanging one."
But buying the instrument isn't
the end for anyone who really
wants to master it. First on the
list of accessories necessary to the
green "uke" man is the indispen-
sible instruction book.
ARMED WITH a knowledge of
simple chords in the key of C, the
novice goes on to purchase music
- any kind of music - just so
long as it has "uke" chords in it.
And, these tunes seem to do the
trick in obtaining the hearts of
shrewd women, according to Ey-
ster.

Zither May Brimg Atmosphere
To Local Run of 'Third Man'

The sound of a zither will echo
through the lobby of the Michigan
Theatre during the run of "The
Third Man."
At least, it will if Gerald Hoag,
the Michigan's manager, can find
a zitherist.
So far he's had no response to
his local want ads, and a quick
check with Dean Earl V. Moore
of the Music School indicated any
zither players in that department
had been keeping their light under
a bushel.
* *, *
THE ZITHER is featured in this
recent British film release. When
director Carol Reed was in Vienna,
he heard a young man playing the
native Austrian instrument, and
decided it created the perfect op-

erating atmosphere for his dis-
illusioned American hero.
This "Third Man Suite" as
the background music has been
called, is now a smash record
success.
Hoag indicated he wanted his
zitherist to play something on the
order of "Third Man" music.
* * *
For those of us who were not
around at the beginning of the
century, when the zither was the
favorite American instrument,
it's a small wooden box with
strings across it, played with a
pick.
So if Hoag gets a response to
his plea for a zitherist, we'll soon
be seeing how it was done back
in 1900. And "The Third Man"
will have an added attraction.

By ROSEMARY OWEN
Students who want the smug
pleasure of saying they've read the
oldest book in the Library are in
for a sad surprise when they fi-
nally locate it.
The oldest 'book' is more than
100 Babylonian-cuneiform clay

CAN'T TURN THESE PAGES!
Oldest Library Book Proves 'Muddy'

tablets,adating from 700B.C.
which can be seen on exhibit in
Newberry Hall.
These clay blocks, inscribed
with stylus-made symbols, look
like the tracks of a lost kitten on
a freshly-laid cement sidewalk.
Only scholars who have devoted

many years to learning the Baby-
lonian tongue can decipher the
messages imbedded in the clay.
* * *
NO ONE WITHDRAWS these
'volumes' from the, files any more.
Long ago, researchers used all the
modern techniques of photography
and managed to get good repro-
ductions of the indented clay
pieces.
Using these, scholars trans-
lated the odd-shaped symbols
into records of battles, or long
tax lists. After these transla-
tions were published, the clay
blocks were useful only as his-
torical references and were re-
tired to a life of public exposure
at the Archeological Museum.
If the thought of droping a clay
block on his toe doesn't please the
average student, perhaps he
would settle for the easier-to-
handle though younger, papyrus
manuscript of segments of the
Epistles of St. Paul, which date
back to 300 A.D.
* * *
WHEN THEY WERE published
in 1935 by Prof. Sanders of the
University they were considered
extremely important textually.
But demand for them is slight
these days, since newer, yet un-
(Continued on Page 5)

Faculty Hold
Five Offices
In Academy
Two members of the University
faculty were elected and three re-
elected to posts in the Michigan
Academy of Literature, Arts and
Science following its 54th annual
convention here.
Elected vice-president was Prof.
Edward B. Ham of the French de-
partment and secretary, James H.
Robertson of the English depart-
ment.
* * *
REELECTED TO the post of
treasurer was Prof. James T. Wil-
son of the geology department;
editor Prof. Frederick K. Sparrow
of the botany department and
librarian, Prof. Warner G. Rice
of the English department and
director of the University library.
Elected president was L. R.
Schoemann, director of the
Conservation Institute at Michi-
gan State College and coordi-
nator for junior academy, Wil-
liam J. Gilbert of Albion College.
The Academy also voted to affil-
iate as a regular organization
member with the Michigan Coun-
cil for UNESCO and to provide a
research endowment fund to raise
funds for research grants to mem-
bers of the Academy.

1.

r t
DAUf
r

h

A

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a tine.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
PERSONAL
HUNGRY?
You don't have to be. J. D. MILLER'S
CAFETERIA at 211 S. State offers you
a complete tasty dinner for 59c, in-
cluding entree, potato, vegetable, sal-
ad or dessert (pie or cake), bread,
butter, beverage. Hmmm, good!! )2P
3 GUYS-6 TICKETS--OBJECT 3 GALS.
If you're not "tied up," call up, for
"Lace It Up." 211 Cooley, E. Quad by
Thursday. We are on the level, hope
ycu're prone to believe it. )35P
CLUB 211
TO ALL CLUB 211 MEMBERS:
Your ticket expires only when com-
pletely punched. Need not be used on
consecutive days-good anytime. Take
advantage of this for delicious meals.
)2P
TIME or LIFE $4.75 a year. Special re-
duced student rates. Available through
Student Periodical Agency. Ph. 2-8242
to order. )2
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209S . State
Phone 8161 )1P

BUSINESS SERVICES

HELP WANTED

TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty.-)4
FOR SALE
50 ALBUMS-Bach to Stravinsky, fine
condition, 50c per record. Deluxe,
portable player-changer $25. Call Don
Pelz,_2-7603. )70
PORTABLE UNDERWOOD typewriter.
Year old, used very little. Ph. 2-6934.
)71
WISCONSIN & IMPORTED CHEESE-
Complete line of Holland, Danish,
Italian, Norwegian cheese, imported
English Meredith & Drew cookies. All
kinds of fresh frozen fish, frog legs,
shrimp and lobsters. Saline Frozen
Fools Locker. 7641 N. Ann Arbor Rd.,
Saline, Mich. )72
MAN'S RALEIGH with all attachments.
Excellent condition. 2-8265 after 6:00.
)73
GOLF CLUBS-Brand new matched set,
4 reg. irons, 2 woods, $23.95. Chas.
White 0-21 Law Club 3-4145. )66
G.G.G. SUIT $15. Alpacuna Topcoat
$10. Tux $25. Sizes 36 and 38. Ph.
9882. __)67
BETTtR EASTER BUYS-Men's dress
oxfords $4.99; white dress shirts $1.99;
sports shirts $2.99; gabardine pants
$5.35; open 'til 6 p.m. SAM'S STORE,
122 E. Washington. )5 _____
COMPLETE SET of Spaulding registered
golf clubs. 8 irons, 3 woods and bag.
Original cost $141.00. Will sell for
$80.00. Ph. 2-4633. )68
Cousins on State Street
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS.
A LARGE SELECTION at 50c to $1.
)3
Cousins on State Street
JUST ARRIVED - PRINTED SILK
SQUARE SCARFS IN BEAUTIFUL
SPRING COLORS
TOCOMPLEMENT YOU. )3
FOR SALE - Naval officers uniforms
complete set, size 35-36. Ph. 2-5559.
_6_9
CAMERA-Voigtlander Bessa, F3.5 to 32,
shutter to 1 /500. Little used. With
case. Robbery at $160. Call 3-0148. )50
BABY PARAKEETS, canaries, finches,
African lovebirds. Birdsupplies and
cages. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. Seventh.
)2B
MISCELLANEOUS
LOST--Horn rimmed glasses in red
case. 2049 Stockwell. 3-1561. )25L

SALESLADY for ready-to-wear shop.'
Must be experienced, references re-
quired. Part time and including Sat-t
urdays. Apply in person. Budget Shop,
611 East Liberty. )9H
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
LOST & FOUND
LOST-In Student Publication's Bldg.,
Weston exposure meter No. 3822946.
W. Barth, Michigan Daily. )45L
LOST-3 keys with Michigan Union key
tag No. 26844, Wed., March 23. Call
Ben,rPh. No. 2-0845 after 7 p.m.
_Reward. )46L
LOST in General Library-Black plaid
folding umbrella. -Reward. Nancy
Hutchinson, 265 Jordan Hall. )47L
$5.00 REWARD for tan spiral notebook
marked1 "Journal." Call J.P. 2-3219.
______________________)48L
LOST-Yellow gold LAPEL WATCH, in
Nat. Sci. Bldg. or Rackham or between
the two. REWARD. Ph. 2-58178. )43L
WILL THE GENTLEMAN who mistak-
enly took brown topcoat from coat
rack south lounge of Union last Fri-
day afternoon please return it to John
Callohan, 420 Thompson, Room 3.
)44L
LOST-Black and grey Sheaffer pen,
lever type, stamped J. H. Jaecker,
March 20th between- Stockwell and
Bus Ad. Reward. Call 3-1561, 1552
Stockwell. )39L
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING SOUTH to Houston Texas.
Leaving Thursday, April 6. Call 2-6768,
Bob, ) 12T
DRIVING TO L.A.-Easter. Need driv-
ers. Call Herb, 3-4080. )13T
__ FOR RENT 4
MEN'S SINGLE ROOM - Two blocks
from campus. Innerspring bed. Tele-
phone 2-7044. )15F
BIRTHDAY
BITS
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Happy Birthday
All you .little ones,
Be you cousin, nephew, daughter,
Not to mention parents' sons.
Your friends have thought to greet you
In this new and novel way,
So as long asthere are birthdays
We think we're here to stay. )7P
Read Daily Classifieds.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
KEEP READING this column-Some-
body is bound to have a birthday
some day.
DENNIS-Happy birthday. Maurine,
Use Daily Classifieds
And Save Money
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Last Times Today -
Dana ANDREWS-Marta TOREN
Stephen McNALLY
A UNIVERSAL , ~ .

b

*

i7

- Starts Thursday --
QUIET WEDDING
... UNTIL THE
STORK
r ..:.;:: 4>" ARRIVED!
RO OUN Barbara HALE
NCOtU,.,~rn oPTruf

c~o,1

ROOMS
FOR RENT

hk.

Pw

Continuous from 1:30 P.M.

ATTRACTIVE SINGLE ROOM for male
student. Close to campus for $5 per
week. Call Bob. 7039. )58R
- - - - ---_.-- - ---
FRATERNITY
ANNEX FOR RENT
See Mrs. Brown, 1105 Hill Street. )14F

. .

. ..

TODAY &

25c
until
5 P.M.

35c
after
5 P.M.

THURS.
12c
I Kiddies
All Times

A11

BUSINESS
SERVICES

Also!

CARTOON
NEWS

BURTON

HELP
WANTED

A

1-

1 _

COLOR 1COL
-TiE:WAPT CZA NGf
VAI.1l1ZIf I.C

Ph. 5651
Friday,
aturday, Sunday

PRICEnCUTS every day Spring Items
coming in. NEARLY NEW CLOTH-
ING SHOP, 311 E. Huron. Ph. 3-0166.
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
2-9020. _)lB
- -----HILDEGARDE SIIOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
TYPING--Reasonable rates. Accurate
work. Phone 3-4040. )25B
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while you go out - anytime.
Kiddie Kare, 3-1121. )10B

SHOE SALESMAN
FOR
PART-TIME AND SATURDAYS
MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE IN SELL-
ING WOMEN'S NOVELTY SHOES.
EXCELLENT PAY FOR ANYONE WHO
CAN REALLY SELL.
APPLY TO MR. CARMEN
RANDALL'S
306 S. STATE STREET
PART TIME HELP--Freshman or soph-
omore. Hickey's Service Station, 300
N. Main. )11H

L.... I IO ILSRiL~S

G1IFTf6

hand and 7eteml~
OPEN AS USUAL -
featuring Children's Books, Games,
Educational Toys and Gifts.
What a spot for Easter Shopping!

OPENING TONIGHT
7he Department of Speech
presents
SHAKESPEARE S
a tragedy of ingratitude
Wednesday through Saturday
March 29, 50, 351, April 1 8 P.M.

,.4

1,

I

E

oil 1111111 1 111
F

11

I

How abo ut a B ag of
S

I

f eaturing
BREAKFAST, LUNCH
AND DINNERS
prelpared by
AKIKI ADr)P/'r,r W AFI I VNIOWN/K

FOLLETT'S... second Floor
C1 ile iroe t atNorth University

i

11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan