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February 17, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-02-17

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____________________THE MICHIGAN DAILY

COCK YOUR EYE AND LEF 'ERS FLY:
Boyd MeCaslin Plays Hard. and It Pays Off
Bly PRES 'HOLMES j loyd1 had come to play here
"A bucket of blood and a gallon Iwhen Ozzie Cowles first took
of guts,", was the phrase used by, v over the reins of the Wolverine
assistant cage coach Bill Orwig cage squad in the fall of 194:6.
to describe Boyd McCaslin last He had played under Cowles at
January, when the stocky cager Dartmouth in his freshman
was running on his twisted left Iyear and wanted to continue
ankle the day after he had injured:<>"5:.;,r
.. working with the new Maize and
it. # ABlue coach.
Without the slightest; inhibition'
the Michigan forward, following' The first game of the seasonx
Coach Ernie McCoy's orders to !...that year was against Michigan
try it out, raced in for a couple.. State, and Boyd made his debut'
of lay-ups while McCoy and Or- f .: inMciancg.nal. om
wig looked on. They both shook ing success. He pumped in 19
their heads in bewilderment at points to lead the Wolverine scor-
the determination of the 23-year- ~esi h 12 oto h pr
old cager. <l tans.
One of his most vivid memories
THIS INCIDENT is typical of stm rmtetm ewsplay-
stm rmtetm ewsBoyd's philosophy of playing bas- ing ball at Dartmouth. The In-
ketball, which is nothing short of 1 dians faced an Army team com-
giving everything you've got. ? posed of Messrs. Glenn Davis, Ar-
He plays the game for all he's nold Tucker. and Hank Foldberg,
worth, and at every chance he to list just a few. Trailing by 11
gets he's always practising and points at one period in the see-
speinees in;::?:: thaae ow ~. nd half Dartnmouth went to work
Hi iners andhgme ended up on the long end of
ever, is not limited to merely play- ti the 55-53 score. Boyd had been
ing it all-year around, he has his sikadpae ha ihto h
k ~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ n plye tha nighte forre thead.r _ ..........
locker coee ihsoisad~~fis iei w ekbtill
slogans of the "greatest game ever , 'THlE D)EACON'-Boyd McCas- accounted for 15 big points.
played." Atog egautsti
"Shoo fortwo nd fllow lin, scrappy forwarud whom for- AlhuhhErautsti
tho, and "Co your eyeland mer coach Ozzie Cowles brought June, giving up basketball is the
throghand ockyoureyeandfarthest thought from his mind.
let 'er fly," are only a couple of with him from Dartmouth, is If things go according to his
th ueos iso ag die expected to see heavy duty pln1ewl uthseprec
thenumros bts f ageadvceagainst the Gophers Saturday to works and coacputhi bsetball.nc
pasted prominently on Boyd 's night. towran cahbskbl.
locker. . Mack Suprunowicz summed up
4 McCaslin's zest for the game when
THE "DEACON" "one of a jfigure out, did the best jiob of he joked, "Boyd will be playing
dozen nicknames the fellas have jcarr~ying out his slogans his very basketball when he's in bed dy-
for me," and which he can't quite I first game at Michigan. ing!"

'M'Defensive Average
Ranks Third in Natio0n
Rhode Island Tops ini Nationi Offensively ;
EOklahoma Aggies Lead D)efeniv~e Averages
NEW YORK - (RP' - Rhode 1.380, Loyoia (Ill.) .377; Muhlen-
Island State's "firehouse" basket-! berg .376; Bradley, .469, William
ballers lead the nation's majorI and Mary .368; Western Michigan
college teams in scoring average .365; Pittsburgh .362; Bowling
with a mark of 70.5 points in 13 Gr'een .361, and Wyoing .361.
games, closely followed by Yale; Davidsoni leads in percentage ofl
with 69.5, the National Collegiate free throws sunk. 262 out of 367
Athletic Bur'eau reported today, attempted for a .714 mark. Follow-
Following in order are Loyola ing in order ar West Virginia
(Md.), 68.3; Bowling Green 68.2; ;.693, Valparaiso .693: Colorado'
)Illinois, 68.1; Colgate, 68; Western,'.688: Virginia Military .688; Yale
Kentucky, 67.9; New York U.,I .686:; South Carolina .686; Denver
67.8; Cincinnati, 67.3, and Brad- 1.681; Southern Methodist .679;
ley, 67.2. The figures include New orkU., .678. and Colgate,
games of last Saturday night. .678.
The Oklahoma Aggies, third!
ranking team in the Associated WVISCONSIN had scored the
Press national poll, continue to most free throws in one game. 31
hog all the defensive honors.! out of 46 attempts against Mai'-
Coach Hank Iba's close guarders quette.
have permitted 18 opposing teamst
an average of only 34.4 points. When it comes dlown to the
important business of ouitseor-I

I I

Intramural Sports- Score Round-Up

I

TUESDAY NIGHIT'S RESULTS
FRATERNITY BASKETBALL
A LEAGUE
Zeta Psi 36, Omega P'si Phi 14.
SAE 54, Phi Kappa Sigm., 27.
Delta Tau Delta 23, Chi Phi 19.
Phi Gains 37, TKE 36.
Clhi Psi 34, Theta Delts 16.
Betas 63, Phi Sigs 19.
Phi Delts defeated Kappa Alpha
Psi (forfeit).
Sigma Phi 25, SAM 14,
DKE 38, Delta Clhi 7.
Sigma Chi 54, Tau DelW Phi It.
LambLda Clhi Alpha 45, Phi
Sigma Kappa 12.
Alpha Delts 22, ATO 21.
Psi Upsilon defeated Delta

Sigma Phi (forfeit),I
Phi Kappa Tau 35, Kappa Sigs
19.
FRZATiERNITY BASKETBALL.
B LEAGUE
Delta Tail Delta 28, Kappa Sigs
19.
FRATERNITY PADDLEBALL
SAE 3, Delta Tau Delta 0.
RESIDENCE HALL
PADDLEBALLJ
Cooley 2, Adams 1.
Vaughan defeated, Prescott
(forfeit).
Lloyd defeated Allen Ruinsey
(forfeit).l
FACULTY VOLLE YBAL.L
Engirt. Aero 3, Public Health 0.t

Enigin, Mlath. 3, Navy, 0.
Law 2, Army 1.
? LATE I-M RZESULTS
Water-polo (semi-finals)
Zeta Psi 6, Kappa Sigrma 1.
Basketball
Sigma. Phi Epsilon 28, Delta Up-
silon 21.
Theta Chi 45, Trigon 17.
j Philippines 35, Turks. 14,
Paddle Ball
Sigmau, Phi 3, Delta Chi 0
Sigmva Cli 2, ATO 1
In1d(eendent Basketball
Lar~y Aces 37. Ramblers 28
International fBasketbahl
Chitiese 25, Indians 4

SIENA, the second-best defen-
sive unit, has yielded an average
of 41 points in 41 games, followed
by' Michigan, 42.1; Minnesota,
42.6; Wyoming, 43.1; St. Louis,
43.2; Washington State, 43.5; St.
Bonaventure, 44.3; Loyola (Ill.),
44.6; and Idaho, 44.9.
Loyola of Maryland, third in
offensive average, is tops in the
country in percentage of field
goals sunk. Out of 1,265 tosses
from the floor Loyola,'s sharp-
times for a percentage of .383.
Other leaders are Seton Hall,4

ing opp)onents, Kentucky, the
nation's No. 1 quintet, has aj
jbig edge. The Wildcats havej
averaged 65.5 points per game
and have permitted an average
of 46.3 a contest, for a spread
of 19.2.
Tulane is scored with an aver-
age margin of 18.4 points over its
foes. William and Mary is third
with 17.6, followed by Columbia,
and Loyola (Ill.) 15.3 each, C.C.
N.Y. 15.2, Western Kentucky 15,
Bradley 14.7, Illinois 14.3, and
Yale, 13.2.

Trackman Thomnason
First Won Letter at 16

I

Hill Refutes 13ig De fensemtan Theoroy

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WOOL ENS
ore in .
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613 EAST WILLIAM STREET
F. A. TINKER, Manager

By BILL CONNOLLY
Who ever heard of someone 16
years old earning a letter in var-
sity track at a Big Nine school?
Bob Thomason not only heard
of it, but he did it when he placed
third and fifth in the mile in the
conference indoor and outdoor
meets, respectively, in 1945. At 16,
he was the youngest Michigan
runner to ever' wear a varsity "M".
And that's only the beginning.I
With the exception of a two year
period in the Army, most of which
was spent in Korea, ThomasonI
has been running ever- since. He
is now competing in his fourth
year of varsity track at Michigan,
and was recently elected captain
of the 1949, squad by his team
mates.
THOMASON FIRST made Big
Nine track coaches sit up and
take notice when he turned in a
Sizzling performance in the 1945
indoor conference meet. That was
the night that the Maize and
Blue thinclads edged Illini track-
men by one point: final score;
Michigan 55 1/10, Illinois 54 1/10.1
In those days, with the dead-
heat twins, Ross and Bob Hlume
running one-two, it was a wide
open race for third place in the
mile. And there never was a
more wide open race than that
mile event in '45.#
Thomason turned on the heat'
on. the last lap of the race, and
pulled up into a tie for third place
LOOKING WELL-GROOMED
is distinctive for Michigan Men.
We excel in Workmanship, Sani-.
tation and Personnel. Queries in-
vited!!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State
TUXEDO and
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SPOUITS
ROG (()FLZ, Night Editor

By BOB SANDELL
There was a time when a hockey
coach wouldn't take a second look
at an aspiring defenseman unless
he packed enough weight on his
frame to jar the opposing wing-
men with his body checks.
Connie Hill, veteran defense-
man of the championship Michi-
gan puck team, claims those days
are over, and he proves his point
every time he skims over the ice
for the Maize and Blue.
3CONNIE, the smallest Wolver-
ine skater at five feet six inches,
contends that stick handling and
skating ability are just as impor-
tant assets today as the capacity
to rattle the other fellow with
a smashing body blow.
Hill has been plenty success-
ful at his poke-checking and
other less bruising defensive tac-
tics, too, for he has been one
of the stalwarts of Vic Heylig-

er's teams since the fall of 1945.
He caine here after being dis-
cha~rged from the Canadian
Army and was team captain his
first three seasons.
Like most of has teammates,
Connie had his biggest thrills in
college hockey last March out at
Colorado Springs in the national
tournament.
HE LIKES to think of the time
when, oddly enough, Michigan was
behind 4-2 in the final game with
Dartmouth and two of his team-
mates were sitting in the penalty
box. It was against these trenmen-
dous odds, that the Wolverines
racked up a goal and went on to
wvhip the Easterners 8-4.
It must be added that the be-
spectacled little native of Coppera
Cliff, Ontario didn't do badly
in the tournament either. Hie

pulled the "hat trick" in the
first game with Boston Collegef
by slapping the black disc into
the nets three times, quite a
feat for a defenseman in any
contest.
THlE 150-POUND stickmnan has
had his minor adversities too. In
a game with Colorado College two
years ago, Hill had an assist that
was rather embarrassing for him
since it resulted in a goal for the
other team.
The puck which had been
batted up in the air hit Connie
on the head and flew into the
net before Goalie Jack MeDon-
aid, had a chance to stop it. The
bewildered Connie didn't suffer
any injury, though, and the
Wolverines won anyway.

with team mates Arch Parsons
and Dick Bernard.
This sweep of 15 points in the
mile was no small factor in the
final point total that evening.
But to prove that a runner
doesn't have to be an old man to
"double" on races in a meet, 16
year old Thomason came back
and ran a fast 880 that was good
for a fourth place and two more
points for the Maize and Blue in
that event.
WITH A START like that, it's
no wonder that Bob came through
with needed points for ox-coach
Ken Doherty in 1946 and '48, and
can be relied upon to help boost
Coach Don canham's point total
for this year.
Thiomason doesn't spend all
his time running. At present lie
is carrying 19 hours of classes
!and is majoring in English.
After his graduation in June
he expects to go to Priniceton
for post-grad work.
Track fans in Chicago who saw
a 16 year old kid score much-need-
ed points for a Michigan track
team in 1945 would probably rub
their chins and mumble: "Hmmm,
tempus fugit!" when they discov-
er that Thomason is married now,
and the proud papa of a 6 months
old son!

Don Rehfdeldt Is HighScoring Ace
CHICAGO --- ("')-_ Wisconin's basketball center Don Rehfeldt
looms as the No. 1 choice to capture the Big Nine individual scoring
championship.I
Official statistics released for the season's three qiuarter mark
show the 200- pound, 6-foot, G-inch badger tied for second place
with Minnesota's Jimn McIntyre at 137 points. Ohio State's Bob Raid-
iger, another center, retained first place during the past week witlr
1138 points.
Raidiger and McIntyre have only three conference games left.j
Rehfeldt has four--one on the road against Iowa and three at home
against Northwestern, Iowa and Minnesota. In Iowa and Northwest-
ern, Rehfeldt will face two of the weakest defensive teams in ,the
conference. During the past weekend, th 21-year-old Wisconsin pivot
man, who has another season of conference competition ahead, hit
20 points against Northwestern and 16 against Purdue.

~.I> T
t 4 ,1 f r1'j

I

NEC, I'M NO
1HARBINGE R OF .
RUIN, BUT IF YOU ,
CONTINUE BEINGf
N'ASTY, YOU'LL
N E V E R B EPR S D N O F fs ,f I G C
THE SDEN O
- z a t/ IPSTAE
~~C A~Y! A .'lOULD-
ts. . . PRESIL2ENT SOL
r ( , .jHAVE

r ,,--- ., -ABLE AS$IWIGHT PROVE IF 'tECTal
.4~ PRESIDENT OF THE STUDE~NT BOD'Y,
SNOT'SOR~AL.~.IDCOM iT PR11IPUI ASI$ iP I
~' . .',H>GIKE IC S5NO.-HEAD 'APROMISED THE EILIMO0SYHARFY
AAKM N FOR US j DE~LIGHTS THAT MY RIVAL DOES
.. f ,H RUMPJH-- HRUMPF(
J . "4 EC, YOU'VE GOT PRYUR RN E E A IC O 3AJ~°1,H
THAT'S WHY YOUR. ,.:.~' CHANGED TfO PHILIP MOEMSI: BA01NAGS
THROATS RAW ~ I'LL BET Y/OU WOW ALL TH I3 EHIND) YOUR.
AN Q YOU'R E "4 UN DERGRAVS I N ZQMQRR.QW NEOLOGISMS
IRjIRITABLEWNY II IG/'StKF
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PHILIP MoItiS SWELL!-
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Sy DEFPINITELY
T FEELS LESSTTIGt \* (
IRRTATNG. . .. I ,,
AN D Q CO 1'T :"M1 "".<:^r . ;:'::" .." ELL I'LL.T Y u
:..::.;:::>:,"::;;;r:: ,A YT IG BUT
"' :' '' :'r <r r r I IN

4
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liliioi
Min
ivCIl
Ptirdu
Ohio
Indiai
Wisco
Iowa
North

Big Nia'w
51(111ng
WI L PF"0OP
,i ..7 1 478 423
esota ..7 2 453 371
[IGAt!N 5 2 322 309
Li...6 3490 479
State. .5 4 520 499
nia . ... 3 5 386 385
mnsin. .2 6 391 420
... 1. 6 329 406
iwest'n 1 8 460 537

f

pet.
.875
.7781
.714
.667
.556
.375
.250
.143
, 111

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A square flag
(divided zit half)
while oi~ltopi,
blue oil botloini,
indicates local rain
or Pl/ow.

y4
'Yf
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:,
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l
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hr;:

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Thursday, Friday, and Saturday ONLY
~ ~ f~-'Men's Slacks

STORM

WARNING:i

....................
5o GENTLEMEN; IF YOU ELECT AE
HRESIDENT, R.ESTASSUREO I WILL.
SEARTHE IMPERATORIAL.
YOKE AS LIGHTLY AS A
j TEN-TON ANVIL
MEC
HEC'S THE SRIGHTasr 'SENDIN ' THOSE
FELLOW ON 'T'HE
CAMPUS! HE'D MAKE 0 of fd - ru r 'M

I -HANK YOU FOR
ELECTING ME H1EAD'
r OF THE STUDENT
BODY AND 1 PR0Mil$E
'THAT 13ODY WILL NO0
LONGER APPEARTO1
HAVE SUFFERED

APOGEE (4-o-jee) -- A climax or culmination.'
BADINAGE (brid-i-nii)--High class wise-cracking.
CIGARETTE HANGOVER (Don't pronounce it;
got rid of it l)-That stale smoked-out taste;
that tight dry feeling in your throat due to
smoking. J
CIMMERIAN (slms-oir-i-an)"-Dark as a witch's
cupboard.
ELEEMOSYNARY (,I-ee-moee-ln.Qh-roe)-in the~
free or "hand oul, class.
OLAMAMAN (glam-ah-mnan)-Masculine of
"glanial" (a."'neologism', see below)
IRSINGER (har-bin-jer) - a herald or fore.
runner.
IMPERATORIAL (ims-pair-aoh"'t4.yal) - Corn.
nmanding or top brass.
NEOLOGISM (ne.41--jIzrn) - a newly-coined
word.r
PERIPHRASIS (per-if-rob-sis) - saying little In
many words, of' hot air.

11Come main, sleet, or snow, your feet

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~AA DANDY PRESIDENT fCOMING STUDEN
OF OUR UNION E~LECTIONS!

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