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April 19, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-19

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BIB

'THE MICJ!i;AN DAILY

TUESDAY,

GENETICIST SPEAKS:
Knowledge of Heredity
HelpsDiagnoseIllness
P -

Modern knowledge of heredity
has many times proved a life
saver, according to Dr. Laurence
H. Snyder, dean of the University
of Oklahoma graduate school and
noted authority on medical gene-
tics.
Speaking here yesterday, Dr.
New Course
In Reading To
BegimToday
Students who have trouble
plowing through their textbooks
can speed up their reading in a
four-week course beginning to-
day.
The course, which involves no
grades, meets at 4 p.m. Tuesdays
and Thursdays in Rm. 4009, Uni-
versity High School.
THERE, STUDENTS will be in-
troduced to a tachistoscope, and
other visual aids which help de-
velop reading speed.
A movie, "Speeding Your
Reading," will be shown at the
second session of the class to ex-
plain the methods used.
"The majority of students who
have taken the course in the past
show definite improvement," ac-
cording to Cameron Meredith, of
the Extension Service, who will
teach the class.
INFLEXIBILITY in the teach-
ing of reading accounts for much
of the difficulty slow readers have,
according to Prof. Irving H. An-
derson of the education school.
Writing in the Sschool of Edu-
cation Bulletin, he says provi-
sion must be made in the schools
for individual differences in
reading.
Salesmanship
Talk. Slated
For the benefit of all students
seeking jobs, Daniel L. Beck will.
discuss "How to Sell Yourself," at
8 p.m. today in Rm. 130, in the
business administration building.
Beck is the Director of the Exece-
utives Selection and Training In-
stitute and the Vocational Coun-
seling Institute in Detroit.
He will point out how students
can analyze themselves to discover
their weaknesses and capabilities,
so that they may emphasize their
merits to full advantage when ap-
plying for a job.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional
business fraternity, is sponsoring
this meeting which is open to the
public.

Snyder cited numerous cases in
which practical use of genetic
facts had been invaluable. Most
important fields of use are pre-
venting and diagnosing illness,
prediction of whether the trait will
occur and the solving of medical
and legal problems.
*~* *
"DEATH HAS been prevented
several times," he said, "in car-
riers of a gene for hemolytic ic-
terus, a type of anemia." If the
gene is detected in time through
blood tests, removal of the spleen
will avoid death.
Quicker, more sure diagnosis
of illness is made possible by full
knowledge of family history
when a person exhibits any dis-
ease or abnormal condition, Dr.
Snyder said.
He also cited the case of a pa-
tient who thought he had heart
trouble because of frequent breath-
lessness and his club fingerb, a fre-
quent sign of illness.
* * *
"UPON examination, it turned
out that a doctor had told him he
had heart trouble," Dr. Snyder
said, "and the patient developed a
neurosis about it, which brought
on the breathlessness. The club
fingers were an unrelated heredity
condition."
One of the greatest uses for
knowledge of blood groups, is in
legal problems, such as paternity
cases, he said.

Philips Hits
Dismissal of
Communists
By dismissing three faculty
members from is staff last Janu-
ary, the Universi+,,y of Washington
hoped to establish a precedent of
making membership in the Com-
munist Party sufficient grounds
for removal Prof. Herbert J. Phil-
ips declared Sunday.
Prof. F hilips ( who was dismissed
from the University of Washing-
ton for admitted membership in
the C'mmunist Party, spoke at a
meeting of the Young Progressives.
* * *
"BUT THE final report of the
Tenure Committee hearing the
c<:ses stated that no charges of in-
!ompetence or non-objectivity
were being brought against me,"
he said.
"The report recommended
that I and another colleague not
be dismissed, but added com-
ments that enabled President
Raymond Allen to say that the
)Committee did think that Com-
munists should not be allowed
to teach."
And working on the basis of
these added to comments, Presi-
dent Allen recommended their dis-
missal to the Board of Regents,
wro approved the action, Philips
odded.
Philips cited as "without foun-
dation the- charge that Commu-
nists favor violent overthrowing
of the government, or that party
members are mentally enslaved.

Air

ww

NEW

T I N Y A T 0 W N - Mrs. John Jurczewski operates a railroad in a miniature village built by her
husband at their Chicago home. In an area 12 by 14 feet are homes, schools and factories.

S E A F A K E K - A I N T K - Capt. Gunnar Van Rosen.i of
the Army Transport Gen. Howe, holds his "Norwegian Coast," first
prize winner in exhibition by merchant marine captains in N. Y.

I

BRIEFING TODAY:

Youth Lobby To Urge
Passage of Legislation

All students interested in par-
ticipating in a statewide youth
lobby for social legislation to be
held in Lansing Thursday may at-
tend a briefing meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union.
Initiated by the Michigan Young
Progressives, the lobby will include
young people of many political'
backgrounds who are interested in
having the State Legislature pass
the Fair Education Practices Bill.
THEY ALSO advocate passage
of the Fair Employment Practices
Bill, a state housing measure, and
an increased unemployment com-
pensation appropriation accordingj
to Gordon MacDougall, chairman
of the campus YP.
"Heartening support for the
education bill, which would
make it illegal for a Michigan
school to employ discriminatory
policies, was given us by the
many students who signed our
petition on the diag last Thurs-
day."

L A S T I C P L A N E - Robert M. Sebring, of San Fernando, Calif., sits at the controls of his
150-pound Wee Wing plastic plane, designed after the "flying wing" with swept-back wings.

"The formation of the Commit-
tee to End Discrimination with 20
groups as members and the recent
progressive anti -discrimination
program of the Student Legisla-
ture is convincing evidence that
the student realizes the need for
such a bill," MacDougail said.
The education bill was written
by Leo Weiss.
* * *
CED Gains Two
New Members
Anderson House and Tyler
House of the East Quadrangle
have voted to join the Committee
To End Discrimination, it was an-
nounced at a meeting of the Com-
mittee held yesterday at the
League.
The Committee also reported
that the Young Democrats will
give their support to the Fair Em-
ployment Practices Bill which at
present is being discussed by the
State Legislature.

EVAN GE L I ST AT A B B E Y-Krishna Venta, of Los
Angeles, Calif., who claimns to have lived 1,900 years ago, walks
with his 34-year-old wife, Ruth, past Westminster Abbey, London.

V

S P K I N G S W I NGS - Louise Hatchett, Doris Wallace and Thelma Mattox (left to right), or
the Lorelei Ladies' softball team, go in for "pepper game" batting at their training camp, Atlanta, Ga.

Into Each Life Some

Rain Must Fat

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S 0 U T H E R N Q U E E N - Miss Jeanne Ziegler (above),
21-year-old senig- of Wayne, Pa., will rule as Queen over the 64th
anniversary ceremonies of Florida Southern College, Lakeland.

Accept it -- and be prepared!
a dress-up-for-rain fashion
$1695

T H R E E - "W A Y B I B L E -Yemenite Jewish refugees en route to Israel read the Bible in
Rashid Camp near Aden, British colony. Each sits in the position in which he learned to read due
to the scarcity of Bibles. Some can only read type upside down while others have to read sideways.

Uk
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Beruffled rain shedding para-
sol and matching great coat.
In gay colored checks,
a grosgrain ribbon ties the collar
high and a self belt nips the waist
It's glamour styling for dull days.
SMALL, MEDIUM

Other
in or Shine"

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Coats

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