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April 19, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CIMIGII+GAI IAI L3

WAGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Phils,
Braves Upset
By Jays, 40;
A's Lose, 32
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The major league
baseball season got off to an up-
set start today as the Philadelphia
Phillies whipped the National
League champion Boston Braves
4-0, and the Washington Senators
set down the highly regarded Phil-
adelphia Athletics 3-2.
The Braves and Athletics had
been established big favorites to
win their season openers in the
nly games on tap yesterday.
* * *
LEFTY KEN HEINTZELMAN,
starting his 10th major league
season at the ripe age of 33, ruined
Boston's first National League
pennant raising in 34 years by
hurling his Philadelphia Phils to
a 4-0 shutout over. the Boston
Braves today in cold and wind-
swept Braves Field.
A skimpy 9,195 crowd saw the
greatly strengthened Phils
clinch the game in the first
inning against Johnny Sain, the
tribal right hand ace, who had
bowed only three times in 15
previous starts against those
rivals.
Richie Ashburn started Sain's
downf all by opening the game with
a single to center. Before the Bos-
ton 24-game winner was able to
retire a batter, the bases were
filled, Gran Hamner and Eddie
Waitkus both reached home on
Fielders' choices that backfired.
* * *
HEINTZELMAN gave but five
hits, of which Alvin Dark collected
a two bagger and a brace of
singles.
President Truman and Clyde
Vollmer, a rookie, combined yes-
terday to get the 1949 American
League baseball season off to a
rousing start at Washington.
Vollmer came through with a
single with the bases loaded in
the ninth inning to give the
Washington Senators an uphill,
surprising 3-2 victory over the
Philadelphia Athletics.
In addition to throwing out the
first ball, the President performed
another valuable service today.
* * *
A SKILLED BASEBALL guesser,
Mr. Truman last year guessed that
the Yankees would win, 8 to 4.
They did, 12 to 4.
Today, Mr.. Truman picked
Washington, 5 to 4, a neck-stick-
ing-out feat seeing as how the
Senators had lost five opening
games in a row.

Nats Win a
NCAA Tramo p
B arthell Places Twice;
M' Duo Finishes Ninth
4----~---------- --

S

Rest

of

Majors

Await

Openers

oline

Title to

Buchana..

Twelve Teams Set To Join
AL, NL Flag Races Today

. . . .

Ed Buchanan is really going
after the trampoline champion's
medals this year - and getting
them.
This time he tramped all the
way out to California where the
University of California was host1
to the NCAA meet Saturday and
added another winner's medal to
his growing collection.
* * * -
ALREADY THIS year, his first
in competition, Ed has notched
the titles in the Big Nine and the
Midwestern Open meets, the big-
gest affairs held in this section of
the country.
Buchanan was in top form as
he displaced Illini Gay Hughes
as holder of the NCAA trampo-
line championship. In dethron-
ing the former titleholder, Ed
was given 275 points out of a
possible 300 by the judges. The
Illinois star was second with
268.
With his win in the trampoline
contest, Buchanan accounted for
seven of Michigan's ten points in
team scoring.
THE WOLVERINES' other
points were gathered by Pete Bar-
thell. Michigan's captain-elect,
placed fifth in a field of 33 con-
testants in the parallel bars event.
Barthell was slightly off the form
he showed in the Big Nine meet,
and had to settle for fifth in tum-
bling.
.Scoring in the meet was even-
ly divided between the 16 teams
entered as Temple University
took firstsplace with only 28
points. Michigan's two man
team placed ninth in the final
standings.
Also ahead of the Wolverines
were Minnesota, 18; Illinois, 171/2;
Kent State University of Ohio,
17; University of California, 17;
Michigan State, 15; Southern
California, 141/; Army, 11.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE was the
only school who entered as few
as two men in the meet who to-
taled more team points than
Michigan. Spartan Mel Stout
alone accounted for his school's
15 points.

Stout tied for first on the
parallel bars with Joe Kotys of
Kent State. Temple garnered
two individual championships
as Joe Berenato came out on
top in the side horse and Bob
Stout topped the high bar field.
High point man in the meet and
only man to successfully defend
his title was Charlie Thompson,
who piled up 288 points to take
the tumbling championship.
Southern Cal's Jerry Todd won
the flying rings title and Joe
Kotys led the entries in the all-
around scoring.
The NCAA record in the exhibi-
tion 20 foot rope climb was bro-
ken as Ken Foreman of Southern
Cal did it in 3.4 seconds.
DO YOU KNOW.. that Michi-
gan was one of the forefathers of'
baseball, opening the season of
1866 by beating Ann Arbor 33-11?

Daily-Barth
PAIR OF ACES - Edsel Buchanan (left) who trampled all
corners in the NCAA trampoline contest in California and Pete
Barthell, who took two fifth places, are both sophomores on the
Michigan gymnastic team.

Depth Gives Tennis Team
Edge Over Big Nine Rivals

FOR MOTHER'S DAY - MAY 8th
A Perfect gift for a Perf c a sweetheart ...--
Order your fraternity mother's pin or the
national mother's pin atv
Burr, Patterson & Auld
1209 South University Phone 8887
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i
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6
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By JOHN BARBOUR
Depth of talent is what should
put Michigan on the Western
Conference tennis throne when
the last match is played at the
Conference Championships at
Evanston Illinois on May 28.
With Western Indoor Champion,
and Western Conference Singles
Champ, Andy Paton heading the
Wolverine tennis roster, there
seems little doubt as to the out-
come of the number one singles
matches throughout the season.
*, *, *
BUT RANKING below Paton
are the flesh and blood of the
Maize and Blue net power. Bill
Mikulich, Al Hetzack, and Fred
Otto are vieing for the next three
positions. Mikulich who just re-
ported out for tennis a short while
ago seems headed for his last
year's position of number two
singles.
Hetzack, the surprising soph-
omore from Hamtramck, will
probably face his first Big Nine
opposition in the number three
spot, though veteran Fred Otto
is close behind at number four.
Otto and Mikulich were both
members of last year's team that
turned in a sterling record of
seven Conference wins against no
Conference defeats. Otto was in
the three slot last year but re-
current sinus trouble continually
took him out of the singles line-
up and sometimes forced him from
play altogether.
DON MAC KAY HOLDS the
number five slot and could handle
number four if Otto is hit by
sinus this year. Gordie Naugle
and Dick Lincoln have yet to play
on the outdoor courts, but they
seem to be pretty even and may
alternate at the number six post.
The doubles pairings will
probably be the same as last
year with Paton and Mikulich at
one, Hetzack and Otto at two,
and MacKay and either Lincoln
or Nougle at three.
Rivalling the Wolverine tennis
stars are Northwestern's Wildcats
who have a very fine man, Grant
Golden, at number one singles this
year. Golden has shown terrific
improvement since last year, pull-
ing himself up on the Wildcat
ladder.

i

r i

Minnesota has a fiery num-
ber one man in Ken Bayun, who
Paton beat in the Conference
finals last year . . . they rate
about third while Wisconsin and
Illinois come up behind. Illinois'
Dave Brown should show up
well.
The first match scheduled for
April 23 with Purdue might be
called off. Purdue, never a tennis
power, has been having difficulty
picking a team to make the trip.
After that the Wolverines meet
MSC and in rapid succession her
Big Nine rivals and other teams
such as Notre Dame and Western
Michigan, but the depth of Mich-
igan net talent should prove all
the steam necessary to power the
Maize and Blue to the Western
Conference crown.
'M' Mariners
To See Action
The Michigan Sailing Club has
cleared the decks and is again
ready to set sail.
Commodore Jim Rukin and the
Wolverine Sailors face their first
test of the 1949 sailing season as
they swing into action in the Mid-
West Invitational Saturday and
Sunday at Whitmore Lake.
* * *
THE SAILOR.S will compete
against seven other mid -west
schools; Bowling Green, Illinois
Tech., Indiana, Oberlin, Knox,
Purdue, and Cincinnati.
A total of fourteen races will
be sailed. Each participating
school will enter one boat in
each race.
The purpose of running so many
races is to allow each boat enter-
ed to race against every other
boat entered. This eliminates any
advantage one team might have
because of a slightly better boat.
The Michigan sailors are ou to
better their record of last year
when they placed third behind
Notre Dame and Bowling Green.

Take Action
On Scimitar
ClubPlea
The Michigan Managers Club
last night took under advisement
the Scimitar Club petition asking
varsity status for fencing prior to
recommending to The Board of
Control of Intercollegiate Athlet-
ics.
This action was taken aster re-
ceipt of the petition by the Ath-
letic Administration Office, yes-
Today is the deadline for all
entries in the all-campus fenc-
ing tournament. Eniries will be
received at the I-M building of-
fice.. Preliminaries. start .to-
morrow at four p.m. in the
building's fencing room. The
finals are scheduled for Friday
night.
-Ed Micllef.
terday. The matter will probably
be put to a final vote at the next
meeting.
THE PETITION was submitted
by Ed Miellef, Scimitar Club cap-
tain.
In addition to the signed peti-
tian, The Scimitar Club's re-
quest for varsity status con-
tained other data.
This data surveyed the national
collegiate fencing situation, whichj
sees the sport as having varsity
status at almost every major col-
lege in the East and in many other
sections.
The Crew Cut!!
is blended and Shaped Smooth-
ly to your facial features. It's
suave, collegiate, individualis-
tic - Consult our 9 Tonsorial
Artists Today!!
The DASCOLA BARB ERS
Liberty off State

Rain Spoils
'2' Baseball
!Jouite D ebu0:to
The weather man continued to
play havoc with Michigan's base-
ball schedule as yesterday's game
against Wayne University was
galled off because of wet grounds
and low temperature.
As a result, the cancellation
postpones the Wolverine's home
opener until Friday afternoon
when they will tangle with In-
diana, one of the strongest hitting
clubs in the Conference, in their
first Big Nine tilt on the Ferry
Field diamond.
BUT THE INCLEMENT weath-
er conditions did not halt the
Maize and Blue workouts, as Coach
Ray Fisher had all the throwers
tossing the ball around inside the
Yost Field House yesterday after-
noon.
As Coach Fisher had predict-
ed after the southern swing,
failure to hit in the pinches was
the major weakness that caused
the Michigan nine to drop a
doubleheader to Purdue Satur-
day, 5-1 and 2-1. This was the
first time in Fisher's 29 consecu-
tive years of coaching at Mich-
igan that his squad has lost both
ends of a twin bill.
Although the Wolverine hitters
fell down in the runs-batted-in
column, the Boilermaker hurdlers
didn't walk a man in either game
last weekend, a fact which not
only kept them out of trouble
most of the time, but also only
allowed Michigan to advance men
on the basepaths the hard way,
without any breaks to help them
along.
THIS EXHIBITION OF perfect
control was another thing Fisher
hadn't seen in 29 years of coach-
ing.
The Wolverines outhit Purdue,
14-9, in the two ganes, but the
Boilermakers capitalized on the
breaks and made most of their
hits count for a run or two.
Surprisingly enough, the ex-
ceedingly muddy playing field and
the cold weather saw only two
errors, but both of them were
committedby Michigan on rather
easy chances.

Rainy Skies I'redaet
Newhouser On Hill
By The Associated Press
Weather permitting, 12 more
major league teams swing into ac-
tion today following yesterday's
pair of upset victories, Washington
tripping Philadelphia, 3-2, in an
American League encounter, while
the Philadelphia Phils blanked last
year's National League champion
Boston club, 4-0, behind the five-
hit pitching of Ken Heintzelman.
Cold and rainy weather, how-
ever, is predicted throughout the
two circuits, which will probably
resilt in a sharp drop in atten-
dance, originally estimated at
about 280.000.
IN DETROIT a pair of fresh-
man managers will get their ma-
jor league baptisms when Chicago
meets the Tigers.
Bengal manager Red Rolfe,
managing a professional outfit
for the first time, is sending Hal
Newhouser to the mound against
Jack Onslow's choice, Al Gettel.
The Detroit southpaw last year
won 21 games, the only hurler in
the junior circuit to take more
than 20 victories, while Gettel's
record was eight triumphs aginst
11 losses.
A crowd of 50,000 fans is ex-
pected.
* * *
THE WORLD Champion Cleve-
land Indians will help St. Louis
open the latter's home season.
Manager Lou Boudreau has
named Bob Feller to oppose the
Browns, while Ned Garver will
start against the Tribe.
Last year's records were 19 won
and 15 lost for "Bullet Bob" and
seven victories against 11 losses
for Garver. About 15,000 people
are expected to attend.
JOE DOBSON will start for Bos-
ton when the Red Sox take on
Philadelphia in "the city of broth-
erly love." Southpaw Lou Brissie,
who last year beat the Bosox in the
opening-day doubleheader, will
take the mound for Connie Mack's
team.
Boston is generally picked to
take the American League pen-
nant this year.
The last game in the junior cir-
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Indiana 9, Eastern Kentucky 3.

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ed for Cutrtain Raisers;
as Tiers Face Chisox
cuit matches Washington and New
York at the Yankee Stadium.
* * *
ED LOPAT is Manager Casey
Stengel's choice to start for the
New Yorkers, and he'll be opposed
on the mound by veteran Sid Hud-
son.
In the National League there
are three single contests and a
double-header scheduled.
The twin bill, traditional Pa-
triot's Day affair, will find'Phila-
delphia trying to make it three in
a row over Boston in Shibe Park.
* * *
CURT SIMMONS and Russ
Meyer, former Chicago Cub, have
been selected for the Phils, while
Billy Southworth's choices are
Warren Spahn and Vern Bickford.
The New York Giant-Brook-
lyn Dodger feud gets an early
start with these teams facing
each other at Ebbets field.
Larry Jansen, the Giants' one-
man pitching staff, will oppose Joe
Hatten.
THE PERENNIALLY strong St.
Louis Cardinals will open Cincin-
nati's home season with either
Harry (the Cat) Brecheen or
George Munger on the hill.
Cincinnati will start Ken Raf-
fensberger, who last year threw
a pair of one-hitters against the
Redbirds.
In Chicago a pair of 40-year-
olds will take the mound when the
Cubs face Pittsburgh.
The Cubs will start Emil
"Dutch" Leonard, while Rip Sewell
has been named for the Pirates.

L

Prics i f u Joiln, lub 2ll
It's new . . . it's different . . . it's the wonderful CLUB 211 eating plan that saves
you money. Nowhere else on campus-nowhere else in Ann Arbor can you eat 3 delicious
meals for less than $1.40 a day.
The very first day of its opening scores of students flocked to Club 211 to purchase
this week's meal ticket. This is true testimony of CLUB 211's fast-growing student accept-
ance. It's a great indication of CLUB 211's popularity among all you thrift-minded students.
s Y aFull'WeEekYof'Meal
SAMPLE DAY'S MENU

FICTION, NON-FICTION,
TEXT, REFERENCE, and
CHILDREN'S BOOKS.
Priced from
9 to 99e
also hundreds of
STATIONERY BARGAINS
Sale Starts Today

I

a

--

Breakfast

NORTHWESTERN has more
depth than any of thesother Big
Nine opponents that Michigan will
face this year.
20o
eurrent rate on
insured savings
Extra earnings on Bonus
Savings Accounts

O VER

1 00 YEARS

AT MICHIGAN

* ' 8

Lunch

Choice of juices or fruits in season; Cereal or eggs; Unlimited
bread; Pat of butter; Choice of toast, sweet rolls, or dough-
nuts; Beveragr.
Soup or juice; Spaghetti and meat sauce or braised beef;
Whipped potatoes; Glazed onions or peas and carrots; (Salad
may be substituted for dessert); Unlimited bread; One pat of
butter; Fruit Jello; Coffee, tea, or milk.
Cream of tomato soup; Beef loaf or baked ham; Baked potato
or glazed sweet potato; Harvard beets or buttered green beans;
Salad; Unlimited bread; One pat of butter; Ice Cream; Coffee,
tea, or milk.

RAINCOATS at
REDUCED PRICES
for standard first quality makes
originally priced at $15.00 to $21.50

Dinner

'I

1' 4!

1095 to $1595

ZIP-OUT LINED COATS
of wool mixture gabardine with all-wool
zip-out liners.

l9 Meals .. .
(one on Sunday)
No Breakfasts
No Weekends
No Breakfasts

. . . . . $8.50
..... $7.50
. ... $7.50

$2 950

and $3950

A.

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Sio~P na tn IIP InI U plUr cxr~

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