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April 01, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1_.

Coeds Revise
RushingPlan
Counselling To Aid
Sorority,_Rushee
Under the new rushee counsel-
ling system accepted by Panhel-
lenic Association ten counsellors
will be chosen annually.
Selection will be made from a
group of coeds consisting of two
coeds chosen from each of ten
h'ouses who will be representeo
each year. The Panhellenic Board
will hold interviews with the
girls and select one from each of
the sororities in the group.
Counsellors must be sophomores
or juniors at the time of election.
They should be intending to finish
a four year course. An asset would
be a knowledge of Panhellenic
rushing plans, Sororities will
choose the girls they believe most
qualified to be counsellors.
A TRAINING program for coun-
sellors will be given under the di-
rection of the rushing chairman.
Miss Ethel MacCormick, social di-
rector of the League, psychologists,
and personnel experts will help to
train coeds selected.
Counsellors will not wear their
sorority pins while working for
Panhellenic. During rushing
they will not attend rushing
parties, rushing meetings or
member voting meetings. As
members of Panhellenic exclu-
sively during rushing they will
be able to help rushees to a
greater extent than if they were
identified with a particular
house, according to Christine
Blair, rushing secretary of Pan-
helenic.
One of the duties of the coun-
sellors will be to supervise an edu-
cational program for rushees
which will begin in the fall. Rush-
ing counsellors will have informa-
tion on chapter histories, recom-
mendation procedures, and finan-
cial data, available to them.
THE PRINCIPLE duty of Pan-
hellenic rushing counsellors will
be to advise rushees and answer
any questions which may arise.
Parents and friends of the rushees
will also be welcome to make in-
quirias.
Interviewing for counsellors will
begin April 18.
Hillel Foundation
Will Hold Rally
For UJADrive
Hillel Foundation will sponsor a
rally at 4:15 p.m. April 12 in the
Union Ballroom for the United
Jewish Appeal Drive.
National goal of U.J.A. is $250,-
000,000; Hillel's goal is $9,000. Ap-
proximately $1,000 toward the
goal was collected from Hillelza-
poppin show.
Movies of Palestine will be
shown at the rally to explain why
the money is needed and where it
will be sent.
Three U.J.A. organizations to
receive money from the campus
drive are: United Service for New
Americans which Americanizes
immigrants to the United States,
the Joint Distribution Committee
which takes care of relief, recon-
struction, and immigration work
in Europe and North Africa and
United Palestine Appeal Commit-
tee which takes care of settlement
in Palestine.
The Foundation will serve din-
ners and lunches from April 13 to

April 21 to students who wish to
observe the Passover holiday.
Traditional Seders will be held
on April 13 and 14.
Reservations should be made be-
fore April 7 to facilitate the plan-
ning of meals. Students may con-
tact Miss Goldberg at the Founda-
tion for additional information.

ALL POINTS EAST:
I Students Plan Summer Travels

Going traveling, either during'
spring vacation or this summer?
Then the word is. go East, young
woman! Instead of heading out
to the great west country, travel-
ing coeds are heading to New York
and points east-to Europe.
To deal with the nearest prob-
lem first, however, how about a
change of scene during spring
vacation? Everyone needs it, and
by planning ahead on the fi-
nances, at least weekend away
from the usual home-to-school-
axis can be managed.
COEDS FROM Ann Arbor, De-
troit and other nearby towns are
especially anxious to get rid of
the wanderlust along about the
first week in April. Although it's
always nice .to fly, sitting up on
a train costs about half.
For short trips, either one or
several women can manage to
visit another Michigan college,
or one in a nearby state for
the weekend. It's a lot nicer to
know someone there, but it's
not necessary.
If one of the local gang goes
1o school at Oberlin, for example,
their Easter vacation starts a
week later than ours. So take up
Susie on her invitation and visit
her for a weekend! It's always a
good idea to see how other colleges
ind universities operate and sim-
ply traveling is fun.
AS FOR NEXT summer, since
the tilne is now to get plans set
up, Europe is the place to go.
The only difficulty lies in financ-
ing such a journey. There are sev-
eral trips being arranged, how-
uver, which are well-chaperoned
and cost a minimum.
One group will be in Stutt-
gart, Germany, for six weeks,
rebuilding some of the destroyed

buildings. A group of men stu-
dents will go to Munich again
this summer, as they did last
year.
There's always the chance of
spending the entire school year,
studying in Europe. Smith Col-
lege, for example, sponsors a jun-
ior year in Geneva project lasting
from September to July and in-
cluding six weeks' study in Paris.
THE BRITISH ISLES are on
the list of trips this summer, too.
One of the most inexpensive trips
is sponsored by Donald Watt's
experiment in an international
living group of Putney, Vt. He
sends groups all over the world.

Further information on this proj-
eet may be obtained from Bill
Sinnigen. 5010.
The Student Religious Asso-
ciation has a great deal of in-
formation on trips to Europe,
and local travel bureaus are a.
good place to check. So the time
is now, if Europe's the goal,
either for the summer or for
next year.
Any time of the year, a change
of scene is a good idea for stu-
dents. After all. the travelling
opportunities offered now are per-
haps the best ever, and the chance
to travel won't present itself as
often after college.

d'fl'4hju9 Coffee ob
1204 South University Avenue
serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1]:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
Closed Sundays
- - 7 - ~~7~

MICHIGAN SONGSTRESSES--Thirty-five members of Women's Glee Club will present concerts including groups of Elizabethan
Madrigals, art and folk songs, Michigan songs, and a medley from the Gibson Girl era in Paw Paw. Battle Creek, and Indianapolis
during spring vacation.
* * * * * * * * *

Women's Glee Club To Tour Midwest During

Spring

Recess

Thirty-five members of the
University Women's Glee Clubj
,ill present concerts in three cities
during spring vacation.-
On Saturday, April 12, the group
will sing at 2:30 p.m. in the Pres-
byterian Church at Paw Paw, un-
der the auspices of UniversityI
alumnae.
Central High School is sponsor-
ing the club's appearance at 8
p.m. Saturday evening in Kellogg
Auditorium, Battle Creek.
* * *t
MEMBERS WILL travel to In-

dianapolis, Ind. on Sunday, where
they will sing at 3 p.m. at the
Marott Hotel. This concert will
also be sponsored by alumnae.
The program includes groups
of Elizabethan Madrigals, art
and folk songs, Michigan songs,
and a medley from the Gibson
Girl era.
Officers of the club are: Mar-
guerite Hood, associate professor
of music education, conductor;
Dorothy Danko, accompanist;
Ruthe Spore, president and as-

sistant conductor; Anne Parker,
vice-president; Jean Dennis, sec-
retary; Nan Hubach, business
manager; Dorothy Jemal, public-
ity chairman; Patricia Hollis, li-
brarian and Valerie Polk, assistant
librarian.
SOLOISTS INCLUDE Louise
Steele, flutist; Charlotte Boehm.
mezzo-soprano; Doris Kays and
Patricia Herman, sopranos.
Although the group has given
performances in a number of
Coeds Seek

cities, this will be the first over-
night tour in the history of the
club.
The club is composed of women
from all schools in the University,
It is strictly a League activity and
has no connection with the Music
School,
After the club members return
from the tour, they will present
the same program in Ani Arbor.
The performance will be given on
Sunday. April 24. in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

TODAY is

APRIL FOOL'S DAY
NO FOOLING...
We're Giving You Values!

Movies Exert Strong Influence

sl

1cker

I

On

Average Am

By MARILYN KLAFER
Few coeds do not have recollec-
tions of the great importance
Shirley Temple's hair-dos tap
ihoes and frilly dresses, had on
their childhoods.
The influence of the American
movie passed long ago from the
realm of pure entertainment into
many other phases of our culture..
Recently the sociologists and psy-
chologists of the nation are dis-
turbed by the dangerous effect
which the movie world has hld on
the average American Woman.
Scores of case studies made at
several universities, colleges and
clinics have provided experts with
the outstanding source 'of frus-
tration and neurosis amonlg wom-
en . . . "lack of beauty."
THE ADOPTION of Hollywood's
standards in judging persons has
not been conscious phenomenon.
The very frequency of the average
persons theatre attendance caused
a gradual, unperceived acceptance
of what Hollywood had to offer as
perfection.
Young men began to lose in-
terest in women who did not
b'oast Turner dimensions and
dimples, a provocative wave cov-
ering the right eye like Veron-
ica Lake's, or a June Allyson
nose that crinkles when a laugh
is emitted.
Women began to note the
change in men's attitudes and to
cope with the situation mimicked
the stars as nearly as possible.
Plain girls were no longer appre-
ciated for their simplicity and
took to all kinds of absurd fads to

erican Women News Posts
Petitions for positions on the.
improve their lot. The unfortu- Panhellenic newspaper, "The
nate part of the mass approval of Pipes of Pan," will be due April 18
such Hollywood ideals was that in in the Undergraduate Office of thei
reality they were not so ideal. League.
A managing editor, business
HAD TIlE GENERAL popula- 1 manager, two assistant editors and
tion been informed of the intense a cartoonist are responsible for
preparations and a lt e r a t i o n s publishing the newspaper each
which most stars undergo before month. These five positions are
they appear before the camera, as open to any eligible Panhellenic
perfection personified, per ha las member.'
things might have developed dif- The newspaper is a new project
ferently. which Panhellenic launched last
But little, if any mention was semester. Members of the associa-
ever made of the strenuous star- tion proposed that a newspaper be
vation diets glamour girls were published in order to keep sorori-
forced to follow before making a ties in closer contact with each {
picture, the surgery, simulation, other and wtih the National Pan-
and the deception used to make hellenic Office. The result of their
movie queens seem what they proposal is a four to eight page
are not. publication, "The Pipes of Pan."
The goals and values which Hol- Included in each issue is an edi-
lywood has subtly imposed on the torial pertaining to some Panhel-
American woman have taken hold lenic project and a story about one
all along the line. According to Dr. of the sorority houses on campus.
Mandel Sherman, Professor of The feature column, "This Is Nor
Educational Psychology at the Myth," keeps the readers posted on
University of Chicago, today's the latest engagements and pin-
teen-agers tend to identify them- hngs.
selves with actresses and their life Copy for "The Pipes of Pan" is
goals are determined in terms ol 1Iathliered and edited by, Nancy
these stars. Veddar, incumbent editor, and her
* i ; two assistants, Nancy Sayre and
T HE AMO UNT of unhappiness Ruth Fairbank. Pat Maloney, as
and critical frustration caused by business manager, handles adver-
these fake ideals is pathetic. Dr. tisements and subscriptions.
Sherman reports that the young -
girls he has dealt with have no Senior Petitioning
regard for attaining intrinsic goals
and are solely absorbed with ex- Reopens to Juniors
ternal appearance. Junior women wilI again lmvc
MOST SPECIALISTS in sociol~ a opportunity to petition for
ogy and psychology agree that senior positions following spring
Hollywood could exert a tremen- vacation, with petitions due by 5
does positive influence on Ameri- p.m. Monday, April 11.
can womanhood if it would pro- Among the senior offices for
duce pictures giving a more real- which juniors will be interviewing
istic slant on the more worth- are the League presidency, vice-
while values and goals in life. ,..,. t t ri..-..

.
.a

f-licker!

K \\
Th NEW

COATS
EASTER BOUND
COLLECTION
Fitted, flared, belted, and zip-
lined-in all the '49 phases.
SPECIAL
for Fri. and Sat.

FOR SPRING
10"9 wool gabardines, crepes,
and twceds --- all new spring
shades--everyone a "find" at-
SPECIAL
for Fri. and Sat.
$35.-$45-$55

SUITS

11

$49.95 and $59.95 14 v2 -242
ORIGINAL VALUES TO $75.00

6 6
AGAIN!.
After Vacation
with
C liff H off
every
Friday & Saturday
Night
211 S. State St.

DRESSES

$700

$1000

$1300

A'S'R 4a
Precision Made and
G-U-A-R-A-N-T-E-E-D
by the makers of Gem Razors
New, precisionperfect light switch
action opens and lights the AS'R
in one, smooth motion! Larger fuel
capacity. Jewel-tike finish of plati-
oum.derived, radiant rhodium.
HALLERS
JEWELERS
717 North University
NEAR HILL AUDITORIUM

I

A wonderful collection of spring dresses in col-
orful prints, gabardines - new colors - new
styles. Sizes 9 to 15-10 to 44-141/ to 241/2.
ALSO BETTER DRESSES
BOLERO and SUIT TYPES at $18.00

HAN DBAGS
in fine leather -
black, brown, navy,
and colors-all sizes+
-all shapes-origi-
nally to $14.95.
$3.98-$5-$7

SLIPS

Tailored and lace
trimmed Bur Mil ray-
on and taffeta slips
-white, black, tea-
rose-sizes to 50-
originally to $5.95.
1.98 - $2.98
$3.98

HC
Towns%
pruff-
gauge
shades
at

)SI ERY

wear and Hole-
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- del ightful

'1.39

I

TYPEWRITERS

This man is smniling

Because

Office and Portable Models
of all makes 1
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY SUPPLIES
G. (. Requisitions Acceped
0. D. MO1ILL
314 South State St,

VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
WATCH! CHECK!
Today is April I
Blue Front-State and Packard
West Lodge PX-Willow Lodge .

presdaent, secretar y, treasur er, one :
senior member of the interviewing,
committee, the chairman of merit-
tutorial committee, the chairman
of the dance class committee and
the chairman of finance for the
dance classes.
Also included among senior of-
[ices open are the publicity chair-
man and a senior assistant as well
as the social chairman, her senior
assistant, the orientation chair- I
man

7Ae (IijabeM Sttailft SeP
309 South State Street

EFFECTIVE APRIL

1

I

I MMOMPO 'N"m - 0- "W"

III

I

}

COLUBIA CUTS 78 RPM PRICES
New Price Schedule Follows

He is pleased with the
Convenience, Courtesy,
and Speed
that h -gets when he

nothin' to it .
We buy oil our equipment from

10" Po90|la

-63c

10" Classical-9Oc
(Prices Include Fcdcral Excise Tax)

12" Classical- $1.05

WA1I a1a..v . c 1- r i , "Inf ir t rsnc woln g; nV 1-11i ki p

Tkp rp

k, A

II

I

I

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