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April 01, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-01

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L 1, 1949

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

__ _. _ Yom.

M' Nine

Invades

Georgetown for

Season's

Opener

<.P

BULL SESSION
by b. s. brown, sports editor

_J

N

Hoya Game Inaugurates
A nnual Exhibition Tour
Fisher Begins 29th Year as Head Coach ;
Four Lettermen Bolster Wolverine Squad
By HERB RUSKIN
Michigan's baseball team moved into Washington today to open!
its 1949 season against the Hoyas of Georgetown this afternoon.
For Coach Ray Fisher, it will be an old story. The dean of the
Michigan coaching staff, Fisher has seen 28 such openers and from
this and the following eight games on the southern trip, he hopes
to fashion the team that will bring another Big Nine title back to
Ann Arbor.
HAMPERED BY THE loss of most of the hitting talent from the
team that brought the Wolverines a tie for the Conference crown
last year, Fisher has been pessi--

f«.

THE MICHIGAN OF THE EAST" has given lie to its newly-acquired
title. Harvard University, owner of the label, last night fired it;
ead basketball pilot, Bill Barclay,. a former Wolverine sports figure
and coach. By this time, it seems a well-established fact that Michigan
doesn't give the boot to its coaches-they quit ! ! !
And if the Crimson intend to keep the title picked upin the
oourse of last year's grid season, they had better mend their ways.
Barclay, a three letter man--football, baseball and golf-at the
Ann Arbor institution back in the middle thirties, resigned his
job as assistant cage mentor at Michigan three years ago to take
over the top spot at the eastern school.
Winning 16 games in his initial campaign against only nine
losses, Barclay seemed well on his way to a long tenure. But in the past
two seasons, his forces have garnered a mere eight victories while drop-
ping 32. Then Art Valpey, another Wolverine football star and end
coach under the master of masters, Fritz Crisler, followed his boss' ex-
ample and resigned his mentorship--to take the reigns of the Crimson
fotball squad.
In his first season, Valpey revamped Harvard's style, employ-
ing the Michigan single wing system. He was so successful and the
Crimson gridders were so flashy, Harvard became known as "the
Michigan of the East." Now the lads who call it "Haavaad" are
doing the moniker dirt.
Incidentally, a recent announcement by Yale (and beg pardon
for using Yale and Harvard in the same story) told of Holgate's ap-
pointment to the Bulldog backfield staff. Gib resigned his position as
head coach at Hillsdale to take the job. His head coach, a monstrous
guy, is Herman Hickman, line coach at Army in the days of Blanchard
and Davis.
* * * *
WORD HAS IT THAT Johnny 'VanderMeer will be Cincinnati's
choice in the season opener against the Cards .... Ken Raffensberger
is slated for mound duty on the second day . . . . College and high
school wrestling, devoid of any phony stuff, is gaining box office mo-
mentum
And here's one typical of Frank Leahy. The Irish coach pre-
dicts his team will lose five games this fall . . . . Frank isn't too
red-hot in his prognostications. Last year, he said that Michigan
would lose its first five games . . . . Robin Roberts, ace Philly
hurler, was more highly regarded as a basketball player than a
diamond star in his days at Michigan State.
* * * *
PAUL J. (POOCH) HARRELL, Indiana's athletic director, went
to great pains recently to get his entire football coaching staff invited
to the Indiana High School Coaches Association meeting at Indianap-
olis. Harrell finally got his chance to introduce his relatively new staff
to the high school mentors. He presented all of the assistants and sat
down.
Clyde B. Smith, head grid pilot at the Hoosier school, was
unruffled as he calmly walked to the microphone and said, "I'd
like to introduce the head coach; you're looking at him." Harrell
has been in hiding ever since.
HERE'S ONE FROM and for the record books: Beginning in 1901,
in 5 games whichended four years later, with a 2-0 loss to Chicago,
Michigan's gridders scored 2,841 points to 42 for the opposition. The
Chicago game snapped a consecutive winning streak, marred only by
a 6-6 deadlock with Minnesota in 1903.
THANKS TO RAY:
Roberts Tabbed Best P hill
Pitching Prospect for 1949

PETE BARTHELL
. . gym captain
* * *
'M' Gnnasty
Elect Bartliell
TO Cap tainey
"Daily Double" Pete Barlhell,
the Wolverines' sensational sopho-
more gym champ, has been elected
by his teammates as the captain
of the 1950 gymnastics squad.
Barthell, termed "a good choice
for the job" by Coach Newt Loken,
recently won both the parallel bars
and tumbling championships in
the Big Nine meet held here at
Michigan.
* * *
HIS WORK DURING the reg-
ular season, which included tak-
ing firsts in his specialties in every
meet, was a big factor in Michi-
-an's winning record this year.
Tomorrow, Loken leads his
squad of nine men to Chicago
for the Mid-West Open meet to
be held at the Navy Pier.
This contest, which met with
much success when staged in con-
junction with last year's Western
Conference championships, will be
held by itself for the first time.
Besides all the Big Nine teams,
there will be squads entered from
Chicago University, Michigan
State, Nebraska and Kent State
University of Ohio.
* * * .
MICHIGAN will also be rep-
cesented in the National Colle-
giates at California April 16 and
will culminate the season by com-
peting in the NAAU's April 30
at Chicago.
Loken announced the award-
ing of nine major letters for
the 1949 season. Receiving them
are: Pete Barthell, Ed Buchan-
an, Captain Dick Fashbaugh,
Jeff Knight, Dave Lake, Gordon
Levenson, Bob Schoendube, Tomr
Tillman and Bob Willoughby.
Reserve awards were given to
Bob Checkley, Wally Niemann and
Bill Parish.

mistic about the chances for a
repeat performance, but under his
watchful eye the squad has devel-
oped into another of his fine
teams.
He has come up with some
very capable replacements for
the gaping holes left when such
men as Jack Weisenburger,
Bump Elliott, Bob Chappius,
Dom Tomasi and Howie Wikel
graduated at the end of last
year.
Such veterans as Jack McDon-
ald, Ted Kobrin, Willard Baker
and Hal Raymond have combin-
ed with a group of promising
sophomores including Bill Buch-
olz, Leo Koceski and Pete Palmer
to put the Wolverines among the
favorites for the Big Nine crown.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN caravan spent
last night at Hagerstown, Mary-
land and left there early this
morning for the Georgetown cam-
pus and the season opener. From
there, the Wolverines will swing
back and meet the University of
Maryland in College Park tomor-
row afternoon.
Then, in rapid order, the Wol-
verines take on the Quantico
Marines at Quantico, the Uni-
versity of Richmond in Rich-
mond, George Washington in
Washington, Navy at Annapolis,
Virginia at Charlottesville,
Washington and Lee at Lexing-
ton and winding up with VMI
also in Lexington.
Last year, the Maize and Blue
came home with only one blemish
on an otherwise perfect record.
That was a 1-0 defeat at the
hands of Ohio University in the
last game of the trip.
ON LAST YEAR'S jaunt, Mich-
iganmethonly three teams that
are on this year's schedule and
beat all of them, edging a sur-
prisingly strong Quantico nine,
8-7, on a ninth inning home run
by Howie Wikel and blanking
Georgetown, 9-0.
. Although the third game was
played early in the spring, the
Wolverines did not emerge with
a victory until June 21, when
George Washington forfeited

because they had used an in-
eligible Player during the game.
In the actual game,tMichigan
found itself on the short end of a
15-11 score in one of the wildest
contests of the year.
Besides these three victories,
Fisher's charges piled up a 19-2
SPORITS
PANDRO S. BEHRMAN, Editor
victory over Camp Lee, scoring
ten runs in the ninth inning,
mostly on walks, and scoring a
10-4 triumph over Ohio Univer-
sity in the first of the two game
series.
Exhibition Baseball
Detroit (A) 1, Boston (A) 5.
New York (A) 9, Boston (N) 7.
Philadelphia (N) 4, St. Louis
(N) 1.
Chicago (A) 10, Cleveland (A)
2. (Called at the end of 5th
because of cold.)
Philadelphia (A) 20, Newark
(IL) 5.
Chicago (N) 7, St. Louis (A) 6.
Washington (A) 10, Cincinnati
(N) 9.
Brooklyn (N) 8, San Antonio 1.
Pittsburgh (N) New York (N)
postponed, rain.

Bob Harrison, first-stringer
on :- higan's (age squad for
four seasos will imike his last
alipearane nder the Maize
and Blue tomorrow night at
Madison Square Garden when
he plays in the annual All-Star
game.
He is the only Wolverine rep-
resentative on the select group
of players which includes
among others Cliff Crandell of
Oregon State, Ed McCauley of
St. Louis, Vern Gardner of
Utah, Vern Mikkelsen of Ham-
line, Leo Barnhorst of Notre
Dame, and J. L. Parks of Okla-
homa A. & M.
Willims Ratih-d
Over Gavilart
[it Third "Bout
NEW YORK -'( A) - Ike Wil-
liams, lightweight champion, and
Kid Gavilan, Cuban welterweight
contender, meet tonight in a 10-
round bout.
Solid, sharp-punching Ike is a
5 to 8 choice to win the Madison
Square Garden "rubber" bout and
become the top challenger for wel-
terweight champion Ray Robin-
son's crown.
A CAPACITY crowd of 18,000
paying $90,000 is expected for the
non-title affair.
In line for the victor is a
possible outdoor championship
match with Robinson, or a good
claim of weight-making diffi-
culties.
Williams and Gavilan split in
their first two encounters, Wil-
liams taking the initial contest,
a little more than a year ago and
Gavilan the return, last Jan. 28.
Both were big betting fights as is
this one.
GAVILAN is a wide-swinging,
flurry puncher who draws the vo-
cal support of the gallery bugs.
Williams throws short, jolt-
ing blows to the head and body
that are" appreciated best from
a front row seat.
Gavilan is expectd to carry an
eight pound weight edge, 146 to
138.

i Montreal in
DETROIT-{.1}-A pair of :oails
by Doc Couture and Gordie Howe
32 seconds apart in the last four
minutes of play gave the Detroit
Red Wings a 3 to 1 Stanley Cup
playoff victory over Montreal last
night and a three-to-two lead in
the best seven series.
A crowd of 14,299 howling fans
sat through a flood of 19 penalties
to see the dramatic climax that
put the Red Wings within a single
victory of a berth in the Cup finals
against defending champion To-
ronto.
MONTREAL scored first, early
in the second period, when Rip
Riopelle fired a backhander as he
sprawled tumbling past the De-
troit goal and caught Detroit net-
minder Harry Lumley by surprise.
For a long time it looked like
that was enough, but Detroit
after missing innumerable good
scoring chances in the first two
periods and failing once with a
two-man advantage for a full
minute, broke loose for all three
goals in the final period.
Sid Abel tied it up with 15 min-
utes left to play when he ripped in
an angle shot on an assist by de-
fenseman Red Kelly, who swept
wide around the Montreal defense.
THEN AFTER Joe Carveth
failed on a clean breakaway
chance, the Red Wings tucked
away the decision with two unas-
sisted goals in barely more than a
half minute.
Couture slipped between de-
fensemen Doug Harvey and
Butch Bouchard of the Canadi-
ens and slid a 10-foot shot along
the ice that goalie Bill Durnan
didn't even make a move to stop.
That was the winning goal but
Detroit didn't stop there.
Howe intercepted a Montreal
pass at the blue line, moved one
stride in and loosed a 55-foot
screen shot that Durnan didn't see
until the puck was in the net.
* * *
IT WAS Howe's sixth goal of the
series and his fifth in the last
three games.
The triumph was another one
for Detroit's No. 1 offensive line
of Howe, Abel and Ted Lindsay.

1up Playoffs
That line now las accounted for
10 of the 13 goas Detroit has
scored in the five games with the
Canadiens.
Both teams headed back for
Montreal on a late train last night.
The sixth game is scheduled there
Saturday and if Detroit doesn't
clinch it then they'll be back here
for a seventh game on Tuesday.
Verdeui'Sets
M edley Mrk
In AAU Swim
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.--(,P)-
Olympic breast stroke champion
Joe Verdeur of Philadelphia bet-
tered the 300-yard medley record
in the National AAU indoor men's
swimming meet 'yesterday.
The La Salle College junior
swam the strictly American event
in three minutes, 22.9 seconds, a
full second better than Adolph
Kiefer's mark set five years ago.
HE WAS ONE of four indoor
champions named yesterday.
Bruce Harlan, Olympic diving
champion, from Ohio State, add-
ed the one meter diving crown
here to his laurels.
Jack Calhoun, also of Ohio
State, was second and Skippy
Browning of Dallas, Texas, was
a surprise third.
Wally Ris of Iowa won the 100-
yard free style event in 51.4 sec-
onds and Allen Stack of the New
Haven, Conn., Swim Club, swam
the 150-yard back stroke in 1
minute 30.7 seconds for the oth-
er two titles.
* * *
JAMES THOMAS of North Car-
olina, who defeated Verdeur in
the morning eliminations for the
individual medley event, was sec-
ond in the finals.
Ris came through in the last
lap to get his free style victory
by 3/10 of a second over second
place Bob Give of the Detroit
Athletic Club. Stack had the eas-
iest time turning in his victory.

Wings Win, 3-1, To Lead

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CLEARWATER, Fla. - (A) -
Robin Roberts, the 22-year-old
ex-collegian with only three and a
half months of big league experi-
ence, appears to have won the No.
1 rating among the Philadelphia
Phillies' pitchers.
There is no doubt that Roberts,
who only a year and a half ago
was a student at Michigan State,
has come along remarkably fast.
The tall, good-looking righthan-
der with the crackling fast ball
and curve, was signed to a Philly
contract in September, 1947. Two
months with Wilmington, Del., in
the Interstate League, where he
won nine and lost one, and presto
-he was with the Phils.
THE JUMP did not faze the'
strapping youth from Springfield,
Ill. He won five of his first seven
starts, completing all of them. A
run of hard luck which saw him
beaten by 1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 scores,
caused his record to dip to 7-9 for
the season. However, he pitched 10
complete games, and wound up
with an 3.18 earned run average.
Roberts credits Ray Fisher, a
former New York Yankee pitch-
er, and currently baseball coach
at the University of Michigan,
with helping him the most.
Roberts pitched two summers
under Fisher at Montpelier, Vt.,
of the Northern League, a sum-
mer circut made up of the finest
college talent in the country. It
was there that he was "discov-
ered" by Chuck Ward, coach of
Rutgers, and also a Philly scout.
"Roberts is a very fine pitcher
right, now," said Philly pitching

coach George Earnshaw, "but he
will be even greater with another
year's experience. With his nat-
ural ability and keenness of mind,
there is no telling how great he
can become.
* * *
"THE YOUNGSTER is very in-
telligent. He is a real student of
pitching. He always is learning, al-
ways thinking. What I like espe-
cially about him is the way he al-
ways wants to win. He feels badly
when somebody gets a hit off him.
He thinks nobody should hit him
safely."
Did Roberts think that he was
rushed too fast?
"No," he replied. "I'm glad I
had those few months in the
major leagues. I've got more
confidence now, and I learned a
lot about pitching-like how to
pitch to certain batters, how to
pace myself and how to keep
runners close to the bases.
"Cy Perkins, Benny Bengough
and Earnshow (Philly coaches)
have taught me a lot.
TUXEDO and
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