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April 01, 1949 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1941.

THE MICHIGAN STORY:I
LS&A, Activities, Form Core of 'U'

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Ths is the thir-
teenth and last of a series of articles
presenting the highlights in the his-
rby o the einiversity of Michigan.
Contributors to today's installment
are Phil Dawson and Jim Parker.
By ROBERT WHITE
It seems appropriate to conclude
this consideration of the indivi-
dual schools and colleges with an
account of the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts-the
heart of the University.
The final section of the Mich-
igan Story will briefly relate the
growth of extra-curricular activi-
ties from insignificant beginnings
to their present complexity and
importance.
L. S. & A....
The 1837 State Legislature
didn't know quite how to go about
setting up a University. It left
mnany vague and general provi-
dions to be interpreted by the Re-
7ents and the faculty.
In specifying three depart-
ments-law, medicine, and lit-
erary-it apparently intended
the latter as a catch-all for
studies that wouldn't fit in the
other categories.
But in 1841, with the appoint-
ment of two ministers to teach
mathematics and languages, the
Department of Literature, Science
and the Arts acquired the empha-
sis on liberal education that has
distinguished it ever since.
DURING THE NEXT decade,
the literary department's enroll-
ment increased from six freshmen
and one sophomore to almost 100
students, and four new professor-
ships were added: Zoology; Chem-
istry; Moral and Intellectual Phi-
losophy; and Logic, Rhetoric and
History.
In spite of the additions to
the department's offerings in
science, its emphasis was on the
classics until, almost ten years
later, President Tappan intro-
duced a scientific course in
physics, astronomy, chemistry
and civil engineering which led
to the Bachelor of Science de-
gree.
It was soon afterthis that one
of the principles of academic free-
dom was given its first expression
here, in President Tappan's words:
"There is no safe guide in the
appointment of professors save
in the qualifications of the candi-
date."
THE YEAR 1871 was an im-
portant one for the literary de-
partment; not only the presence
of 14 women, but also several ad-
ministrative changes, broke long-
established"precedent.
Among these were the intro-
duction of the seminar and of
the accreditation plan allowing
students to be admitted without
examination from approved high
schools.
Eight years later the require-
nents' for graduation were
changed so that they emphasized
the number of courses completed
rather than the time spent in col-
lege. This shift led eventually to
the present hour-credit system.
** *
THE CLOSING YEARS OF the
19th century were a time of in-
tellectual ferment in the literary
department. Great men-astron-
omer James Craig Watson, philos-

opher John Dewey, sociologist
Charles Horton Cooley-were here,
expanding the frontiers of knowl-
edge and of thought.
Michigan had become the fin-
est university of the nation, and
the literary department con-
tinued to lead the way until the
end of President Angell's admin-
istration.
One of the results of this de-
velopment was a reexamination of
educational policy, which was also
stimulated by what was being
done at other colleges.
IN 1912, under Dean John o.
Reed, requirements for admission
and for graduation were revised.
Admission requirements were lib-
eralized to permit free electives in
the high schools.
The group requirements were
set up to prevent overspecializa-
tion.
Better grades were adopted be-
cause the faculty felt a more dis-
criminating system would improve
standards of schlarship. And in
1915, the department became a
college.
* * s
DURING THE '20's, new de-
partments blossomed forth in the
literary college. Economics and so-
ciology, philosophy and psychol-
ogy, and journalism and English
were separated.
Only since World War II has
this process been checked, as
the need to integrate knowledge
became apparent.
Most of the professional schools
began as departments or profes-
sorships within the literary col-
lege. For example, the Graduate
School began as a department in
1892 and assumed separate status
in 1912.
In a real sense, the literary col-
lege is the center of. the Univer-
sity; from it have developed the
specialized schools, and it still pro-
vides the basic elements of an
education.
Athletics .. .
A 20-8 baseball victory over
Wisconsin on May 20, 1882,
marked Michigan's first appear-
ance in intercollegiate athletics.
Football, in which Michigan
was to become famous as
"Champions of the West," was
introduced in 1876 by Charles
M. Gayley, who later wrote the
"Yellow and Blue."
The first intercollegiate game
was played in 1879 when Michigan
defeated Racine, 1 to 0.
* * *
INTERCOLLEGIATE recogni-
tion followed for track in 1893,
tennis in 1894, basketball in 1909,
hockey, swimming, golf, and wres-
tling all in 1921, and gymnastics
in 1929.
Michigan was one of the seven
original members of the West-
ern Conference, founded in 1896,
but withdrew from membership
in 1908, not to regain Confer-
ence standing until 1917.-
In 1901 Fielding Yost came to
Michigan as football coach and
remained in that capacity until
1926. The famous point-a-minute
teams of 1901 through 1905, un-
defeated in 54 consecutive games,
Michigan's first All-American,
Willie Heston, a 49-0 victory over
Stanford in the first Rose Bowl
game, and the "Little Brown Jug"

rivalry with Minnesota were all
products of his early years at
Michigan.
FROM 1921 until Fritz Crisler
took over in 1941, Yost was Ath-
letic Director of the University, a
post created in 1898.
Yost Field House was com-
pleted in 1923 to relieve the
crowded condition of Waterman
Gymnasium, which had been in
use since 1894.
In 1926 the Michigan Ice Coli-
seum was purchased and in 1927
the new stadium was built to ac-
commodate the growing football
crowds. The Intramural Sport
Building was erected in 1929 and
the University golf course was fin-
ished in 1937.
Activities "..
SOCIAL-
In the early years of the Uni-
versity, the social life of the stu-
dents was completely unorganized.
Up to the Civil War, there
were under 200 students in the
whole institution. By the end of
a year it was possible to know
everyone in the University.
Beginning in 1859, all students
lived in rooming houses. The land-
ladies of the town formed a pres-
sure-group which made it almost
impossible to house students in
residence halls, until women were
admitted in 1870
* * *
FRATERNITIES took their
place, beginning in 1845. After a
five-year struggle with the fac-
ulty, they won a secure place in
undergraduate activities.
Although they grew steadily
more powerful until the depres-
sion, the fraternities and sororities

were not the only social organiza-
tions on the campus. The Union.
first housed in the former home
of Judge Thomas M. Cooley, and
the League, built in 1929, provided
dances and social affairs for all
students.
PUBLICATIONS
It was only after a number of
abortive attempts that a success-
ful student publication developed
at the University. It was the
Chronicle, an eight-page, bi-
monthly newspaper, which flour-
ished from 1869 to 1890.
The Chronicle was discon-
tinued when The Daily and a
monthly literary magazine, thef
Inlander, were established. The
latter shortly ceased publication,
but The Daily was a successful
enterprise from the first.
Six years later, "Michiganen -
sian" was decided upon as the
name of a new yearbook, to be
started the next year.
There was also a humorous
magazine, the Wrinkle, which was
published from 1893 to 1905, when
the Gargoyle first appeared.
* * *
POLITICAL
In the earliest days of the Uni-
versity, the only student activity
was debate, which was conducted
in class competitions and later in
societies.
Student government began in
1905, with the establishment of the
Student Council, first of a series
of representative, but, generally
powerless, student organizations.
It was not until the '30's that
clubs were organized on a political
basis, and the present Student
Legislature was inaugurated in
1946.1

Experts Slate
Post-Vacation
Speeches Here
Economist, Aviation
AuthorityTo Speak
Economics and B-45 bombers
will take the spotlight immediate-
ly after vacation, with guest
speakers Prof. Simon S. Kuznets,
and C. J. Hansen, of North Amer-
ican aviation, giving three talks
at the University.
Prof. Kusnets, of the University
of Pennsylvania and the National
Bureau of Economic Research, will
speak April 11 and 12, in the
eighth of a series of 10 distin-
guished economists brought here
for guest lectures on economic is-
sues and public policy..
HANSEN WILL SPEAK on "The
Development of the B-45 Bomber"
at 7:30 p.m., April 11 in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. His talk,
which will be presented with slides,
is sponsored by the aeronautical
engineering department.
Prof. Kuznets, a noted au-
thority on business cycles and
national income, will discuss
"Shares of Upper Income Groups
in Incomes and Savings" at 7:45
p.m. Monday, April 11, and "The
Nature and Measurement of Ec-
onomic Progress" at 4:15 p.m.
Tuesday. Both lectures will be
in the Amphitheatre.
His lectures here will be based
on the researches he is carrying
on at the present time, which
have also been the subject of
fundamental studies by the Sur-
vey Research Center.
Both lectures are open to the
public.

Manuscripts
Donated To
'U' Library
An important collection of
manuscripts and letters relating to
the period in American history up
to and including the Civil War
has been donat ed to the Clements
Library by Clinton H. Haskell, of
Chicago.
The 340 piece collection con-
tains the largest body of original
letters by General William T.
Sherman in the United States, ac-
cording to Colton Strom, assistant
director of the Clements Library.
IN ADDITION to the 90 letters
by Sherman, t here are letters by
nearly all the important Northern
id some Southern generals.
The collection also euntains
material on George Washington,
mostly concerning his family
life. Included is an original let-
ter written by Washington at
Valley Forge in the winter of
1777.
Part of the collection is on ex-
hibit at ClIments Library.
Art Museu mI
cceives Gifts

ELRIslEI5;s: "Z' /

Jaily-Lmania n
TEN MINUTES TO GO-Higher on the inside, lower on the out-
side, this streamlined new model pup fits nicely into a State
Street parking space apparently unaware that his time is running
out.
Hoiwr Groips Elect Officers

Several important gifts have
been mach to the University's Mu-
seum of Art, its director, Jean Paul
Slusser, has announced.
A sum of money, from an Ann
Arbor citizen who desires to re-
main a nonymnous, leas been used to
purchase a recent painting,
" Broaiday Melody," by Mark
Toabey,
A gift of 138 prints, 77 for the
Museum and 61 for decorating the
men's dormitories, was made by
Carl F. Clarke, of Detroit.
Other gifts include a study col-
lection from Mr. and Mrs. Colton
of color lithographs illustrating
the Arabian Nights, by Marc Cha-
gall.

L°' " _ o
J
-+

FOR
SALE

Aw

PERSONALS

'36 CHEVY deluxe coupe, good mechan-
ical condition, good tires, radio, new
battery. Ph. days 3-1511, Ext. 2537.
Evenings 2-9671. )33
FIVE SCATTER PINS in all white or
colored rhinestones. $1.00 pr. and up.
COUSIN'S
State St.
SPECIALS AT SAM'S STORE
Genuile Levi's $3.45
1000 Wool Flannel Pants $5.88
Navy "T" Shirts 49c )
Take Home a
MICHIGAN ALBUM
by the
NOVELAI RES
See--Local Record Dealers
Write--P.O. Box 111
Phone 2-6683 )29
1933 FORD-Good mechanical condi-
tion. Will sell cheap. 555 Packard.
)31
SPRING STATIONERY of distinctive
design-personalized stationery-also
close-outs to suit your pocketbook.
OVERBECK'S
1216 S. University )6
RAIN OR SHINE COATS
Corduroys - Gabardines - Taffetas
$14.95 to $16.95. All Sizes.
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 S. State )2
BRING SPRING to your face and use
Tuassy Creamy Masque.
A $L.7 value for only $1.00.
CALKINS-FLETCHER, State St. )5

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ivommomm~

MICHIGAN Glasses and Ashtrays for
those Spring Vacation Parties.
Glasses are $4.50 a doz.
Ash Trays in two sizes at 25E and 75c.
CALKINS-FLETCHER
State St. )

NOTICE-To our missing salesman.
Stop sending people in for speed
racers. The new Royal has a speed
space for the first time on any type-
writer. Office Equipment Service
Company. 1116 S. University. -) iB
COOLEY-Mackenzie Alumni Basketball
game followed by dance at Mackenzie
gym., Sat., April 2, 7:30 p.m. )29P
SHIP 'N Shore Blouses. Sanforized cot-
ton, whites, colors and plaids, $2.95.
Randall's Specialty Shop,,306.. State.
)lop
SUCCESSFUL SENIORS subscribe to
TIME. Your last chance to save $1.50
by subscribing at the low college
rates. $5.00 for yr. Phone 2-82-42,
StudentPeriodical Agency. Order
now. Your subscription starts when
you have a permanent address.
BABY SITTERS - Call Kiddie Kare,
2-1903; if no answer, 25-7364. )28B
CORSAGES
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Phone 2-7032 )25B
LLST
and
FOUND
LOST-Wed., blue and gold Schaeffer
pen. Ph. 2-4401, 328 Mich. Hse. )5L
LOST-Parker "51" Pen with Robert B.
Euler engraved on it. Please return
to Michigan Daily, Box No. 185
)8L
LOST-Military style Watch. Silver ex-
pansion band, at Yost Field House.
Ph. Charles Froman, 2-4401. )7L
WILL GENTLEMAN with whom I ex-
changed overcoats at Nime & Miller
Restaurant on Wednesday night, 6-
7.30, kindly make contact witl . me.
A. E. Wood. Home phone 5602; Can-
pus ext. 441 - )6L
LOST-1 pr. plastic rim glasses in
brown leather case in the Washte-
naw - S. Univ. area. Ph. James Knox,
2-0949, )3L
LOST.-moray Parker 51 syet. ,Friday af-
ternoon, between new Women's Dorin
and Chemn. Bldg. Call Betty, Roomt
5007, ph. 2-6581. )4L
LOST-Partly done needlepoint. Brown
background. Call 51N~0 after 7:00 p.m.
and leave message. Jarbara Cook.
)1L
BROWN SILK scarf lost vlcinity O
Fisher's Drug. if found, please cal
Robert Kuhn, ph. 2-4591. )96L
BLUE FABRIC WALLET lost in Burton
Tower on Feb. 28. Contents needed
desperately. Reward. Mary Hammond.
Ph. 2-7328, 1014 Vaughn St. )58L

ROOMS FOR RENT
WEEK-END rooms available in private
homes. Call Student Roomi lBurea ii,
2-8827. 11:30-12, 6:30-7:00.,i
-T / HELP WANTED
VETERAN of K-9 Corps to trainc dog,
short period of day. Convenient time
arrangements. Call 9836. )21H
WANTED TO RENT
APT. WANTED by student and wife for
summer session only. Cdli collect,E
Dearborn, Cedar 6645 after 5. )9W
FOR RENT
BACHELOR apartment with private
bath, one block from Hutchins Hall.
Call 2-8565. )18FI
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend guests to the
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 E. Ann Phone 8144
BUSINESS
SERVICES
SPEED-O-TYPING SERVICE - Cle n,
neat, accurate. Phone 2-6441. Reas-
onable rates (free pick-up and de-
livery). )34B
LADIES'
TAILORING
Alterations-Reinodeling
A. GINSBURG
Phone 2-3481 for appointments
)18B
2 Day Service on Shirts
HOME QUALITY LAUNDRY
215 E. Washington Tel. 9035 )33B
EXCESS HAIR removed permanently
by Short Wave Method. Approved by
Am. Med. As'n. Call L. Gagalis at
Marie's Beauty Shop, 2-6696. )31B
EXPERT repair service done on all
typewriters. Mosely 'typewriter Co.,
214 E. Washington. )23B
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TA ILOING
Order,, Taken for
Any Type of Uniform
Reasonable Rates 232020
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing,
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks. Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2B
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE ST)TJIoD 5
209 S. Statfi St. Ph, 8161 )511
CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B
TODAY

The University chapter of Mu,
Phi Epsilon, national music hion-
orary, has elected officers for next
year.
New officers are Ruth Stein.
president, Norma Swinney Heyde,
vice-president; Nancy Finlay, re-
cording secretary; Ann McKin-
ley, corresponding secretary;
Gloria Korhonen, treasurer.
The campus chapter of the
American Insgitute of Electrical
Engineers and the Institute of
Radio Engineers elected the fol-
lowing officers at a recent meet-
ing:
John R. Davies, chairman; Rob-
ert Chutc, vice-chairman; Robert
Jacobson, AIEE secretary; John
Smedley, IRE secretary; Selig
Gertzis, treasurer, and Morton
An Amazing Offer by
imLIDAY
Pipe Mixture
The pipe that every smoker wants-DANA, the
modern pipe, with brightly polished alum
num shank andgenuineimportedbriarbow
Only
fm12 pockettasof-
HOLIDAY PIPE MIXTURE
SIu 12 HOLIDAY wrappers
Get your DANA PIPE
Send to
flLIDAT, Dept. CNRichmond, Ylrnnh
offer Limited to US~A -Ixviree
sae 0 14

Gene

TODAY and SATURDAY
35c until 5 P.M.

C
Sp

Also -
ortoon
peCialty
N ews .r i
"COMAND DO"ECISIO"

1111 m M 1M ' 1t'': f a 0111C'1r ft

NOW and SATURDAY!

" jConinuous Daily from 1:30 P.M.
Weekday Evenings
Matinees 25c & Sundays 35c
COLUMBIA PICTUE r esentsp
W MORE
THAN
UNTAMED with
STALLION Preston Mary William
FURY' FOSTER * STUART * BISHOP

Eldridge, Engineering Councill
representative.

'lus.,

The 3owcry Boys

"SMUGGLER'S COVE"

Tyrone
P 0W E R MIClIGAN

ENJOY GOOD FOOD

COMPLETE supply of golf equipment;
I Bag Boy collapsible caddy carts.
Phone 2-2058. Johnny Malloy, Pro.
)30B

Next
Week

at the rustic

I

I

LOG CABIN INN
Complete Fountain Service

Open 6 A.M. - 11:30 P.M. Daily

2045 Packard Road

Three Blocks beyond Stadium Blvd,

I

SI

SUPPER CLUB

by

M.A. H.

TELEVISION
Franchise Dealers for R.C.A., Motorola,
General Electric and Stewart-Warner.
Aero Radio Sales & Service, Phone 4997.
)7
NASH 600 1948 4=door, 6,000 miles.
Radio, heater, defroster. seat covers,
back-up lights, extra mirrors. Call
5928, 6-8 p.m. )19
IT'S A CRIME-I've outgrown my beau-
tiful $60 spring suit. Light tan her-
ringbone weave, 37 long, 2-piece.
Come take it away for $35, Phone
2-66015. )22
1941 PLYMOUTH sedan, new engine in
1947, new paint job in 1948.,Price
reasonable. Call Bob Gregg, 4896.
)23
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Finches, Tame
Young Cocketiel. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. Seventh, phone 5330. )4
TUCKAWAY HOUSE
Sweater-Mates-Make them Yourself.
Matching Skirt and Sweater
See display522 E. Liberty, Ph. 9582.
Margaret Nickelson Martin )9
FOR SALEC4-Tails, size 38, accessories
and shoes. Call 5054 after 5 p.m.
ANCING
D A %C I

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/ 'I

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ORPHI
Cinema Tni
From All N
Emily Bronte's pc
. adapted to t
Ben Hecht and CI
thur . . . produced
wyn tradition of e

M IkA

I

WHAT IS SOCIALISM?
"SOCIALISM is that social system under which the necessaries of pro-
duction (factories, tools, land, etc.) are owned, controlled, and adminis,
tered by th people, for the people, und under which, accordingly, the cause
of political and economic dcspoti tro having been abolished, classes and class
rule are at an end. Nothing short of that is socialism."-Daniel De Leon.
Cooperatives and "govcrnrment ownership" fall for short of the require-
ments for Socialism. Don'tbe misled into believing that you can amend or
modify Capitalism with its twins, depression and war, out of existence. Don't
be misled into believing that an 'organized ideal" can change the "spots"
of Capitalism or render harmless its fongs and claws. As long as Capitalism
ixists it plays the role of k iller by a proces of slow starvation in interims of
ae and by suddenti 11- ist cr t lime)noI war,

m~5YIaturday card Sureioay
umphs Continuous from 1 30 P M.
lations
owerful novel
he screen by
harles MacAr-
in the Gold-
Lxcellence
F SAMUEL GO LDWYNprens
"WUTHIERING

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