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March 18, 1949 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-18

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PA~f ~'6ta

HE1i '411 4 iGAN DAILY

tniv~vt "AL{CI i8; ig49

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i ... ._.. .._,_.._.....w._.n,._. .._,... ,......._._.aw.._. .m._... ........,. ..

IT SO HAPPENS
* Midterm Muddles

(EITrrn'S, NOTE: All contributions to it
,o lialpens will be gratefully received. They
should he addressed to The Editorial Director,
The ,Daiy°)
Consolation Prize.4
A PPLICATIONS for lit school scholarships
ask: "Why -are you applying for this
scholarship?" Some of the apl)licants can't
thinkc of an answer, try as they will. Olbers
admit they are simply 'applying to find
out how affluent the lit school is. But the
application ends on a cheery note : "If it is
impossible to award you a scholarship, would
youi like to be considered for a loan y,
Chronic Gut
AGROUP OF PSYCH majors were dis-
eussing traumatic experiences in a
dorm bull session the other night. One of
the coeds wasnt sure whether her early
apartment dwelling environment was di-
rectly responsible for her present con-
dition, but. It did have a direct effect on
one deep, experience. Seems when she was
;fix years old, her mother finally carried
out the threat to dispose of a well-worn
"Manma" doll. She stood by the apart-
ment door sadly watching her mother
Editorial s publlchrd in, The Michigan Daily
are written by -iemnbers of The Daily staff
and represent the 'views of the ivriters only.
NIGHT EITOR: CRAIG II. WMSON

walk to the incinierator. 'then as the. in-
cinerator door lbanged(lsheet, she !eard.
floating tip through the shafts the fain~t
wails of ti ~efa~ ivtMaua t~t,
scliolar at, t1his tUniverity recently had :;i
(Iream II. was the kicid of hauting m.Idrettm
which (cOuld I iap en only to Ia 111.111who IS
both aChauver schlair andat {l:;:.r orn
Iteacher.
While adr i.~iie~~ 'rlt, 1, tlol r1 I-
fessor suddenly found himirself tte-ale Luf~

with the great man Chau(,er himself, they
were chatting away about something or
other (~we wish we knew What) when a third
person asked our professor an absolutely
1stumping question about The Knight's Tale.
Ah, thought our professor, the Oporhi nity
of a lifetime, and eagerly lturned to ( ' lr er
for enlightenment.
But the point was never ('larif ied [,or
Chaucer (with what facial expression we
will never know)i merely lininpbed 'jul a--
sharp: "That's; not under Ilse 1assignmret.'

Who Wins Acclaijm?

TrlHEGRIFFMTHS-flOYLE BILL, Mich-
igan's version of FEPC, now in the com-
mittee stage in Lansing, provides for estab-
lislhment of a five man commission to en-
force fair employment practices-a forward
step in the fight. against discrimination.
:l~xder its Provisional, it would be n
lawful:
1. For an employer to refuse to hive a
person because of race, color, c reed, or nat-
tional origin.
2.F or labor organizations to exclude or
expell a person for such reasons.
3. For an employer to print advertise-
ments or use application forms for discrim-
mxating; purposes.
Since the, Federal Fair Employment
?rfactices Commission ceased operation at
the end of the war, legislators all over
the country have recognized the need for
state action in their areas. New York,
Massachusetts and New Jersey have al-
ready adopted, FEPC acts.
In Michigan both D~emocrats and Repub-
licans included fair employment practice
planks in their pre-election programs. The

Griffiths-Doyle bill represents the efforts
of Democrats to carry oust the promise.
However, we are faced with the continu-
ing conflict of a Republican legislature
and a Democratic governors Because of
this, Republicans are very relluetant to
pass a bill which willt give the governor
credit for having initiated a needed re-
formx.
.ao, althoug h bot h arties favor tlhe bill
in theory, the chances are that party Yna-
neuvering will kill it in committee, or defeat
it on the floor.
'his is another example of mnistise of rep-
resentative power. It is high time that poli-
ticians in all parties realize that their first.
obligation is to the people who elected themn
rather than to b3aek-stage politic al na-
chinies, and that the eiiactnient uf lnecessariy
legislation _is more important than who gets
the credit for it.
.Only by a( favor'able vole on thet Griffiths-
Boyle Bill can the Lansing IRepaablicaiis
"how t "t they possess the mYaturxity (the
people of the state have a r'ight,10tepet"5t
in their elected( representatives.
-- Rorua Li jjk y.

ii;. -,. hail Ilei ocome'fa aiy.
Anid iil' tic ve .eta rt t.orne v i' in'Fa rie
st1e4c('CLs ire hi: caipaign sfte a proposedl
World C'onstituent Convention in the fall
of 19:711 at Geneva, Switzeland die moe
I)ttlele{k-ianly, purblic a zpathy-will
have been irouned out.
Ile iets"; gi:,s a p1i ooto i ld Irepraesenitta (.ion
syit e ilof lteeI ig lega tO, Wich'i I ean s
tha1 vaI l Aericranii hlega tell i osen on lhe
basis 0f oiie 1rosin per mllion populal o,
woul:sit in for t he lUniited States tihis
every slt candii Lhie Iist ilel of Co lumbin
Would h e entied to at ltast olie represent a -
Live) Foreign cou n tries also are inivitedt to
{send (t('lega I Cs, by they selfsame electIion
mieth od1s, :i ('ordlw ii tsIari"'11wer's lti of
aci(: on.
Bret, haw-inc-r'S proposalIis not ltiiinlerirll:
arotura1i i ttn' formuirla ie stages; a leadlY
he's seen fil, to contact all state governos,
seeking legislative sippor-t, World Govern-
inent h as actually been icorprat ed into
the forthcomingennessee baillot, endorsed
by Gov. Gordon Browning, and is s'heculed
to 13e voted on inl 1950 by natives of the
state if it gets ithtinl nod at theI icT essee
legislature convention Mar. 21.
Considering all the angles, tle plan
ought, to evolve into a well-knit organiza-
tion. Farmer has given it A lively imetus
by establishing a World Government Fund
camipaignl, with a hoped-for goal of $5,-
1100,000, And lhe intently1 to Kive Congress
the word as sooni as possible ilitte formn
of a p14le cfora. cha'tr of iucorjiorintioni
If the plea. is answeroekfaie l will have
a foundid ion iniul like IteRed Cross and
simrilar pabtriot ic :Igeniesi,
Governor Ori. Mentin Wiliaim, huen
atot.=&;ev. .ohin onolk el Iand hose Seaker
Victor A. Kntox, with wlihon Frner con-
ferredt a few days nago, inticat ecttheiy %ere
.very interested" atnd(1ellcouizged the at to-
ney to go ahead with his ideas Even the U.S.
State Depart ment ave partial sympathy
even if Joe Stalin didn't even bother to
acknowledge ta let ter from. harmer asking
thle fRussians 1o0":at lea.st meet its halfway
on the proposal."
I s stt isg their sigid s1 for an attainable
goal, Parmner ,atd his followers should e
etonfident of ai sympathetic American re-
spnflsO ItorItle conventiosn. For Il ilte Iast.
large -Seale goals h ave become actualities
imainly beeause of the overwherling Amer
cartt sent inwent for p eace.
I'd 1Rathtw Bc Right:
Bly NANIIIEL GRAFT ON
1 lCFNTX i wrote at series of colutms on
on L ow hand it is for an average famnily
tor ~et, by inl abig aily, een on $60) a «eel
I recountedciea e iio-Dies. Snce tihin Ith
letters have brant comting iii, a id there!' is
oneLtene-'runiting through these lettIe"
Which, I thinky, has public interest.
And that is a eep feeling on the art
of' these infict ion-hit families that nobody
cares. At the risk of' sounding immodest
(which is not my intention-nmy intention
is to na ke a political point) 1 smote one
writer': et is comforting to know that
there is someone w o takes time to find
out hown the high cost (i' living hits some4
of cs."Another writes: °"t enjoyed those
articles;. they expressed my feelings and
gave ore some relief." I could go on. down
to thie bottomn of this ptage.
And( the political point is that there is
an eaormious numnbec' of families wrestling.
atg this motmet, with angry feelings ofrInus-
tration, thIo l they have ineiones which
one have seemetd to them beyond Itheir
dreams. And when I think, of that, I think
of that "strange" Taruman victory last a-

tutun, and it doesn't seem so strange. I have
a feeling that we still don't understand that
election, that we won't understand it, per-
haps, for year~s. but that t' ts bottomr lies
a bitter, thwarted, public sentiment that has
escaped the attention of large seginents of
Contgress and a, good part of the commen-
tating Nworld.
AndI a~s look at these letters, whichI
hold in oute hand, and then at a newspapier
which I hold in the oither, with its bead-
lines about C'ongressional efforts to wveaik-
en rent control, I hatve the feeling thatt
there arc some who atre :makting thiat ee
tioli inist.1k I .ginl, thel'mistake of nt
seeing, of not feeling", o not knio-wig.
I have a feeling we aero building upl to
political ruckuses of which thle surprise Tm-
n u icoy n,-i Dewey was only the fore-
taste, only the~ first trumpet-blast.- For thei
people areY being hurrt in their most wrnsi-
tavi' spot,, in t heir dreamis. Tr ~~former
(Ircealn ilicouiis, fifty or',iixty dlly s a week.
now turns ou Itot be d ross. And, wwvat ciing
front my desk, it is almost, like looking ait, a
world spltino two paorts, for the other
side of the e'qationi is an Eighty-first Conr-
gi'iss wii,gooris to bo' I ising its best to
remake it self ito something" vetry 1much
like the litieti i. the one thiat wentcdown
I-ti6(tdefeat.
It boots civil liberties iround, it mc ks;
ait health insuralce, it muddles rent eon-.
trill. D~oes it hl, \e any feeling. I wvonder.
of what every a temporary IWstPttpnelit
(tt renewarl of renit control means to fai u
ilies which, with at helpless, drowning

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

CURRENT-MOVI---

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Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin iR constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
Mr the Bulletin shoul be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of
the Assstant to the President, Room
~5~Adnisvtration Building, by 3.00)
p.m. on thindy tpreceing publica
L ion (t1:00 a".mia. Sturdays).
FRID)AY, MARCI 18, 1949
Vo L. LIX. No. 118
Notices
'1Pihe General Library wcill offer
for sale to members of the Univer
sity (facuty :anl students) ooks
from its duplicate collection on
Fri. and Sat,, March 18 and 19,
from 1-5 p.m. 'This sale will be
held inl the basement. crridor of
the_ Library, wIhich is reached
through thle door at the foot o'
the mai stairway to the base-I
nrent.
Women students attendinx the
Military Ball, March 18, have 1 :30
ain. lal ! permission. Calling hours
will not be extended.
Tj les for "Froggy Bottom"
Any ment iterested in uishering
for any or all of thne performances
of "PrF'ggvBottom" March 23, 24,
and 25, call the Union Opera Of-
fice, Michigan Union, as soon i
possible. You will need x[ xedo.
but, a tutx witl) soft ,sidi. will be
aaleaU.
Senaior lEigineers: Order Senior
Annournements March 17, 18, 21,
and 22, at, desks ott second floor of
Viest fCil,_llg . ita r Libraiy and
in Itle lobby of Esast Eng. Bildg'.
Names of February, Jne and Au
gust 1949 gratds will he in fan-
11011! fiL'itits.
Expegrielived (... JniorO')-
tatom'. hartLhtillei, utist have thlo-
oughr knowledg e of vir ing, about.
fifteen houns pet' week, including
some evening and Sunday work.
Intei'est ed persons are requested
to report to Personnel Office, 311
Administ ration Building betwen
10 a.tn. tco 12 noon mand 3-5 pl).tn
for preliminary interview.
Approved Social Events for the
Comning'Weekend:
March 18
Congregational -Disiples Guild,
M1 Cluab, Phi Alpha Delta
March 19
Adams House. Alpha Chi Sigma,
Alpha Delta Phi, Alpha Kappa
Kappa. Alpha Kappa Psi Alpha
Phi Sorority, Beta ''ieta. Pi, Delta
Chi, Delta Sigma elt, Delta
Sigma Pi, Delta fal Delta, Delta
Upsilon, Fletcher Hall, Graduate
Student Council, Creene lhouse,
I-ins(dale 'Hourse
Lambda Chi Alphra, Phi Gana
Delta, Phi Kappa Sigim, Phil
Kappa 'ga, IPhi Rho Sigmia, Phi
sit ma Delta, PiNLambda Ph, Psi
Upsilon. Siga Alpha Epsilon,
Signuarl Cli.si"nia Nl, Si gna Phi
Epsilon., he a 1Delta Chi.--Tieta
Xi, 'yr louwse, Winkhelhouse
Marceh '0
Lambda Chli Alpha, Hia ydoen
Hlouse
Women'sIHousingApi ications
for the Fall Semester, 1949: Wom-
enr students on campuIs, now who0
tare not living in dormitotries but
who would like to apply for dormi-
tory accommnodations for the
school year 1949-50 may do so at
the Office of the Dean of WomenI
on April 1, 1949, beginning at 7301

lam.i4 -CEP i w

w

a~m. They will be accepted up to
the number of spaces available
for them. Applications will be ac-
cepted from both graduates a d
i merg ra rluais tes.
Women stuldents now on cai-
pus may apply for supplementary
housing for the fall semester, 1949,1
at the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en on April 11, 1949. Those from
whom dormitory applications can-
not be accepted and all who prefer
this type of residence may apply
at that time,
Approved .Organizations: 'They
following organizations have been
added to thre list~ of approved or-
ganizationms for the second semes-
tom 1948-49:
American Institute of Chemical
Engineers
Chinese Students' Mutual HTelp
Club
Graduate Outing Club
Flying Club
Kappa Phi
Michigan Actuarial Club
National Lawyers' Guild
Young Progressives of America
Bu1reau of Appointments: The
Aetna Casualty midt Sumety Co. will
have representafives here ont
r~Tues., March 22, to interview can-
didates for salaried sales rei esen-
The Kroger Co. will have Mr.
MceCaffery of the Detroit office
here on campus Wed., and Thurs.,
March 23 and 24 to interview stu-
dents for their executive training
program for positions thr'oughkout
the United States.
Further infomation and ap-
pointments may be obtained by
calling Ext. 371. or at 3 528 Admin.
Bildg.
U. s. Civil Serviec, Commission
announces an examination for
nius'-kumf art specialist. Mrther in-
formation may be obtained at the
office of the 'Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Academic Notices
Advaniced Musoic Test for all
graduating seniors in the School
of Music: 2 p.m., Sat., March 19,
206 Burton Tower. The examina-
tionl is compulsory and takes pre-
cedence over all other appoint-
men ts.
Covcerts
organ Recital: Claire Coi, con-
cert organist, will appear, in Ann
Arbor on Sun., March 20, 4:15
p.m., Hill Auditorium. Composi-
tions by Bach, "Vivaldi Daydn,
:Karg-Elert, Reger and Dupre.
The public is inv ited without.
chiarge.
Student ltecitmll: Doris Kays,
solpran~o, pupil of Philip Duey, will
present a recital, 8 p.m., Sun.,
March 20, Hussey Room, Michigan
League, in partial fulfillment of
the reqiuirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Music. Compositions
by Purcell, Handel Pergolese,
Mozart, Brahmns, DeBussy, D-
Falla, and Manning. The public is
invited.
IExh bitionts
Exibit of Student Work, rl,-
partment of Architecture, Univer-
sity of Illinois, through March 18
2nd floor, Architecture Bldg.
Architecture wilding, First
Floor, Work of Francesco Della

'G'ee ... Thanks, Felas'

Leteirs to the EI'itor~

The Daily acvords its readers the
privilege of sbimttng letters for
publication in this column, Subject
to space lmitations, the general pl-
try is to publish in the order In whh
they are received all ltellers hearing
the writer's signature and address.
Letters exceeding :i wods, repeti-
tiousittteritand lter oadl'arsh~na-
tory haracter or suchi lettr, whrih
for any =other reason are not in good
taste will not, he published. The
editors reserve the privilege of e'au-
densing letters.
NealYor
To the Editor:
[ WILL, APPRECIATE hearing
from all the readers of your
paper who would like to see,
former Sec. of Agriculture, now
Senator from New Mexico, Ion.
Clinton P. Anderson int the White
[House in 1053.
-M. 13. IRodgers,
M'erl)oough, Ga.
n' 4
Dismnaye~d
To the Editor:
W HEN I FIRST arrived at this
University two years ago, I
was extremely dismayed at the un-
fair voting setup, having just
learned the inadequacies of the
Hlare Plan the hand way 't was
given a two year trialint my home
town and (lien rejected) In lmy
freshman enthusiasm I joned
with several other students in a
letter campaign to see what could
Jpe done. We finially got the SL4
to hold ati 'informal disusion"
onl the subject after one of their
regular official int ions took place,
From that titme until this semes-
ten the issue has been fairly dead.
Needless to say, I observed this
last outburst with great interest,
because, for a while, at least, it
looked' as though something would
be accomplished. But once again
the groups; which prof it from the
Sala, architet, of Naples, Italy,
through March ID,
Events Today
findergradlute Psychological
Soiety, trill to Cassidy Lake
School, Bus leaves 1:45 from the
east side of Hill Auditorium.
Motion Picture: "Marriage in
the Shadows" (German film), pre-
sented by Art Cinema League and
Association of Independent Men,
8:30 p.m., tonight and Saturday,
Hill Auditorium.j
Nflehigaui Actuiial ('I u.: Pcfe-
sor' Carver will lect tire on Casualty
Insurance. 3:30 p.m1., Friday. 202
Sou t-h Wing. Openi meetin .
Political Siee Graduate Cof-
fee Hlour: 4-5, Michigan Lague
Cafeteria.
Hawaii Glee Club: Meeting, 7
p.m., Ril. 3-N, Michigan Union.
German Cofee Bar: 3-4:30
p.m., Russian Tlea Roocm, Michi-
gan League.
Canterbur'y(CIlub: Open Hou.se,
4 to fl Im..
Association Coffe Hour, Lane
Hall, 4:30-6 p.m. Guest, Venerable
Lokanatha, Buddhist Priest from
Mandalay, :Burmita.
Evangelical and Reformed Guid
Coffee Iloar at the Thome of Rev.
and Mrs. Walter S. Prss, 432 S.
4th Avenue, 4 p.m.
Roger Williams Guild: St. Pat-
rick's Party, Lane Hall, 8 p.m.
Westminster Guild, First Pres -
byterian Church: "St. Pat Party,"
8 to 11 p.m., social hall, church
building.

Comting Eeitis
Graduate Outing Club: Meet
Sun., March 20, 2:15 p.m. at north-
west entrance, Rackham Building
for stroll thiro ug h woodland
haunts. Sign supper list at Rack-
ham checkroom decsk befoire noon
Saturday.
Ren~dezvous: for Summer Esca-
pades: Al-camuts get-together
f or in formatfion a bouit summer
projects, Sat,.. 8:30 p.m., l~ane Hlall.
Movies.
Saturday Luncheon Discutsion1
Group:Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m., Sat.
Venerable Lokanat-ha, Buddhist
Priest from Burma will speak oan'
"Buddhilism.''
U. of M. Sailing Club: All new
and regular inethers meet at the
side door of the Union, Sat., March
19, 1 p.m., to go to, the lake;
weather permnitt ing,

(is(, of h lis systeim lnauiuged (to
iirni' ue foi' its iet ainment. These
groups; are ma inlIy toe fraternit is
and sororities, bt they also in-
clude those independents who
have been ablel(to( win uinder the
flare Plan ii a idwho) feel siicord-
mugl (.hatluthe iy personally enefit
from this plan.
Applying what I kniow ajbout
thte Hare lan di'ectly to thet'cam-
puS, 1 finidthat the cgreattst in-
adequacies of toepresent stupi~
r.ente ci( bout the refletion of t h
acvtual vot e in the catididates
eleced.il It is true C hat, P.R~. (the
Mii a'r Plan) rirors the'percenage
of inidepetndent arind affiliated
votes cast, b~uit"and here's thle
gimmick, the fraternities always
manage to (cast as many votes as
the obviously more numerous in-
depe ndents! Why? Because tie
fra ternit ies arte small, well organ-
ized g;roups which are able 10
force all of thoi' members to vote
by means of a very real social
pt'essure, while inidependent can-
didates must appeal for votes to
diver'sified :individuals who have
nothing in common except that
they do not belong to fraternities.
So, 40 pet' cent of the indepen-
dents and 90 per cent of the affil-
iated students vote.
The most basic reform needed
is the reduction of the basis of
representation. Perhaps thei most.
adequate plan ,would be that of'
dividing the students into residen-
tial ai'eas and allotting seats on
this basis. This would asstre the
adequate representation o1' both
independets arid affiliated stu-
dents.
-Dlick Feiseiuuan.
(1rnitip
To the Editor:
A NENT THE recent rash on
campus of ea ting competitions
featuring the consumption of
hatrnburgers, osters, and a. neat-
gastronomical contest wh i t
Washtenaw County hog, I thought
the following quote front Andrew
I7. White's essay "Bismarck" in his
Seven Great Statesmen (N.Y,
Centutry, 1919), p. 532. might e
of interest:
Ile was extremely fond of
plovevs' eggs, of which lie was
wont to consume fifteen at a
single meal, and once he as-
tounded the waiters of a res-
taurant by eating ou' hundred
and seventy oysters. THis exces-
sive indulgence at table was so
notorious that his estate, Knep-
Ihof, was spoken of as Kneiphot'
(tippling courtt.)J
I think 'the 170 oysters should
be emphasized in view of the cur-
rent statistics in this field on the
Michigan (campuls!
--Thomnas E. Hansen.
3idjMy3Iij
fftir~gau Ba

At the Michi gan .
STATION WEST, with Dick Powell,
AS A WESTERN, this one is about as ex-
citing as a slug of morphine.
With. great effort we recall the llot
running somewhat as follows: a group of ill-
defined characters engage themselves in
double-crossing and/or shooting one an-
other, and making of f with \Wells-Fargo gold
which does not belong to them.
This is a rather unrewarding practice
for all concerned-bTut most noticeably for
*the audeince.
Concerning the cast: we herewith nomi-
nate Dick Powell for title, Mr. Deadpan of
Att H-ill Auditoriumn+. .
MARRIAGE IN THlE SUAI)OWS, in Ger-
man with English. titles.
A MERICANS have realized for a long; time
. vhat *!X4,Z"X the Nazis were. Fr'om the
looks of "Marriage in th e Shadows" the
Germans realize it too.
The film was shown in all sectors of
Berlin, so we feel justified in assuming that
the noble sentiments expressed in it are not
merely for the benefit of American audi-
one es.
Two of these "perfectly nice people" who
Joined the Nazi party through convenience
rather than conviction, and rose in the
hierarchy are shown at various stages in
their career. The whole process fromt self-
deceptive rationalization through blind
adherence is suggested rather than diii-
Sramnmed as their story is traced.
The problem of marriage between a Gen-

1949. The rest of the laye -rs movo lethiar-
I gically about, casting insinuating glances at.
{their fellows, and making sttreaistn'c cotmutiemit
on no speeifie subject.
!There ar'e occasional evidences-ttoitgli it
#takes a sharp eye Iniper'ceive them-. -that
Powell aund sleepy -eyed Jane G1reer are war'l
for e'a('h othevr. A well p~lacedt sip-;stirialig
settles this issue iii short order.
The talent of Agnes Mvoor'ehmead andtt
Burl Yves is so wasted that Olive Oil and
Mickey Mo use, respectively, might replace
them in the pic'ttre, with imperceptible
effect.
Also ran -a too-cute-for-words cartoon
whtich inculcates the following moral: Little
girls who walks around barefooted in the
snow onl New Year's Eve selling miatchles
will get theirs in a technicolor heaven.
-B1ol white.
At the SItte.
NO Mi'nOR VICES, with Louis J~our an,
Lilli Palmer, and D~ana Andrews.
0 Tr , H, 1,this is deligtfuasltl
deli'hitful.
And at, least 60 pi'n ('eit of the~ camputs
will disagree with ine, I'm sure. Not be--
cause t~hiey want to, (of coutrse, but because
the miadcap whimsy so perfectly and unreal-
istically poirtrayed ini ihi is pict re wvil :i pp l
!to not ver i latly.
On the other hand, if you like shaggy
dog stories, if you (canl read poetry with--
out flinching, if you long ago learned to
love Robert Renehley, yott iwill be eut-
tranced at the exquisite burlesque ini this
intangible piece of hani. It unfolds almuost
like a ,IDonald Ogden Stewart stor, andr
is equally charmning only if you tics 11
attempt to tak- it seriousl~i.
Now for that fellow who wanted irtfo-'nma-
tion in his reviews this picture jutifiies
L'Xevery li('O tliing anlyomi'c' ever sitib t111
F~ouns Joirmdcai, who is the supr'eme pet-
ttrayal-imi..quicksilver of till the superdr -ania -

Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publicaitions.

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Editorial Stafff
Hariett Friedman ._. Managing Editor
Dick Maloy ............ ... City Editor
Naomi Stern.......Editorial Director
Allegra Pasqualetti .. .Associate Editor
At Blurnrosen ....... Associate Editor
Loon Jaroff.........Associate Editor
1,obert C. Whiteo..Associate Editor
il. S. Brown...........Sports Editor
Bud Weldenthal . .Associate Sports Ed.
Bev Bussiey ...Sports Feature Writer
Audrey Buttery ......Women's Editor
Mary Ann 11urris Assos. Women's Editor
Bie.s M ayes................l7.ibrartar
Bulsiness Slaf f
Richard Ilanlt.....Business Manager
Jcan L~eoniard .... .Adv ertling Manager
Wiltiam Culmnan ... .Finantce Manager
Cole Christian . .. Circulation Manager
T'elefibro-e 23-24-1
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Allt rlghts; of republication of all other
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Entered at the Post orfice at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, as second-class mal
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