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March 06, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SVNDAYk, lMiR:U &6,19491

BETTER LODGINGS:
'U' Officials Quit AngelII
Hall, Move Across Street4

. . .... ......................... . ......................... ...... .. . .... . ........... .. . .............

-1

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Science Club Craze Fires Deeper-Thinking Students

Moving day is almost over for
President Alexander G. Ruthven
and other high University offi-
cials.
For the past four days a steady
stream of secretaries and moving
men has been shuttling back and
forth between Angell Hall and the
new Administration Building
carrying books and files, off ice
equipment and assorted knick-
knacks.
PROVOST JAMES P. Adams
and Vice-President Marvin L. Nie-
buss are also making the shift to
new offices on the second floor
of the Administration Building.
The new Regents' conference
rooms are ready but the Re-
gents will have to wait until
their March meeting to use the
new facilities.
The office spacesvacated in An-
gell Hall will be used by officials
of the literary college. Some of
these rooms will have to undergo

remodeling before the new occu-
pants move in.
* *
THE OCCUPAT1iN of the Ad-
ministration Building is now com-
plete except for the offices of the
University Broadcasting Service
and Station WUOM. They will not
be ready for use until later in the
espring.
President Ruthven has a four-
room suite in the southwest cor-
ner of the building. His office
and library feature large win-
dows and walnut paneling. The
furnishings follow a modern
style with bright colors of red,
yellow and green combining
with the simple design to pro-
mote a dignified atmosphere.
The Regents' conference room
is also paneled in walnut. Indirect
light streams down from recessed
ceiling panels on a specially de-
fsigned banjo-shaped cherry con-
ference table.
Y, *

By PHIL DAWSON
The intense modern interest in
expanding scientific knowledge is
powerfully reflected in the many
societies (or cults) that flourish
in universities, carrying on nu-
merous esoteric investigations.
In fact, college campuses are the
most fertile spots for scientific
(and pseudoscientific) activities,
judging by what students read
about them in their newspapers.
NUTRITION research at Har-
vard resulted in the discovery of a
possible way to give the thin man
a new lease on life by injecting
fat into his blood. To do this, the
fat had to be broken into small
particles first to prevent blood-
clots.
The trouble with the scheme is

that it only works on rats-hu-
mans who got the shots only de-
veloped a fever and had to be
hospitalized. Until this problem is
solved by discovery of a satisfac-
tory stabilizer, the method will
prove "a tremendous bonanza for
undernourished rats," the Crim-
son reported.
Also at Harvard, the Society for
Parapsychology was busily work-
ing in psychokinesis, armed with
several sets of dice, thousands of
plant spores and a collection of
neurotic paramecia.
* 1* *
THE IDEA is to find out whe-
ther mere mental concentration
can make physical objects do
things they otherwise wouldn't
have done; the society attemptsI

to think dice into coming up all
sevens, spores into growing faster
and paramecia into moving to left
or right.
The other part of the society's
job is extra-sensory perception,
which they're working on in co-
operation with a group at Duke
University-with little success so'
far.
Meanwhile, at Southern Cali-
fornia an alumnus of the univer-
sity told a Daily Trojan reporter
that a scientific machine for com-
munication with the dead is not
only possible-it's probable.
Maintaining that this is the "fi-
nal problem of human endeavor,"
he said men in a number of top-
flight laboratories are working in-
tensively on it.

Psychic research isn't con-
ducted through dark seances
and ouija boards, he said, but
"involves Wilson cloud cham-
bers, extremely high freq uencies
and voltages, ultra-sensitive re-
cording devices and a thousand
other items of modern science's
paraphernalia."
These devices have nothing in
common with standard brain wave
apparatus like the electroenceph-#
alograph, he pointed out. "Those
who believe that the mind and the
brain are one and the same see no
point in speculation concerning
psychic phenomena; this crudely
materialistic interpretation seems
to me so utterly inadequate that
it may become a bottleneck," he
said.

DRIVE CONTINuES:
Local Bed Cross Funds
Help Student Veterans
A considerable portion of the "IN TIIESE ae the Red Cross
Red Cross funds collected this Home Service advances what is
month in Washlenaw Coity will
again be used for assistance to needed and tlen uses all avail-
veteran stuclents, according to able facilities to speed up the de-
Herald Hoffman, Director of the layed check," Hoffman said.
Red Cross Washtenaw Home Hoffman listed other services
Service, offered veteran students. They in-
The national Red Cross driv elute assistance in developing
started March 1. will continue claims,; establishing service-con-
throughout the lnioith, and will nected disability, securing medical
add to county funds. The Univer- evidence to obtain more adequate
sity quota is $7,800 of which $1,800 rating on claims already estab-
has been assigned for students. lished to be service-connected and
converting term insurance to a
RED CROSS Home Service is permanent type.
a special funtilon of the Red
Cross which exists solely for the I
purpose of assisting veteras andl , Jay ; lI
active servicenmen and their fam-
iles. The Seice interviews about ('.i--rIdI .
60 stutlent veterans from the Uni 4II
v0erlltttloil!le ' sity eve l'ymnlt h, IHof fnu- -
said. Roles for ther Student Players
"In the last year, loans and next production, "Boy Meets Girl",
grants to veteran students Will be cast from 2 to 5 p.m. today
amounted to $3114," loffina l in thec Union.
said. "Most of this amount was Parts of the (1o, chauffeur,
borrowed and the students have Yon oin11, studio officeraufis
paid it bCyk."tti modne, udv a n, ir. Majo-
Typical of the fintlcial proh- Tosolnl. Green. Sade, and ra-
lemns, according to hoffmnaln, are di) atoiltner will b~e chosen.
those which occur at the begin- Two male leads. Robert Law and
ning of the semester when lie vet- J. Carlyle Benson, will be case
eran's subsistence check hits fail- ;from 7 to 10 l i. today in the
ed to arrive. Union.
''He ofiten eed funds to get, tThet parts, of Pgyanti the t we
his belongings from the express nurses wx'ill be selected from 7 to
office, and he may need funds to 10 Il.l. Monday in the League.
pay his rent or iieed emlergenvy All interested are asked to try out
medical aid for his family," Hoff- or call Lee Sunshine, at 2-4591,
man said. 203 hayden House.

B EAD THE CLASSIFIEDS
Personals? Transportation? Sales? Housing? Classifieds solve your problems!

Herbert Agar
To Talk at Hill
'England-Today' Will
Be Topic of Author
Herbert Agar, noted political
commentator, author, editor and
diplomat, will lecture on "Eng-
land-Today" at 8:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in Hill Auditorium as sixth
guest of the Oratorical Series.
Author of "The Land of the
Free", "The Pursuit of Haptiness"
and "A Time for Greatness", Agar
won the coveted Pulitzer Prize for
his book "The People's Choice."
As editor of the Courier-Journal
in 1940 he advocated more active
participation of America in the
European War.
He also served as special assis-
tant to American ambassadors in
Europe.
In 1943 he became chief of the
British Division of the Office of
War Information and in 1946 he
became Counselor for Public Af-
fairs and chief of the U.S. Infor-
mation Service in London.
Tickets will go on sale Wednes-
day and Thursday at the box of-
fice of Hill Auditorium.
Lane Hall Meeting
Roger J. Voskuyl, scientist who
worked on the Manhattan project
of the atom bomb, will speak in an
open meeting at 4:30 today in the
Fireside Room at Lane Hall on
"Christianity and/or Science?"

AT THE NORTH end of the
room three is a large white marble
panel with the seals of both the
University and the State of Mich-
igan superimposed. Underneath
the two seals is inscribed the same
quotation which adorns the lintel
of Angell Hall.
The passage is an excerpt from
an act providing for the disposi-
tion of the Northwest Territory
passed by Congress in 1787.
To Hold World
Union Panel
Among the outstanding local
radio programs to be broade'ast
during World Government Week
will be a roundtable discussion at
8 p.m. Tuesday over station
WHRV.
Phillipps Ruopp, contributing
editor of Common Cause, Prof.
Russel Fifield of the political sci-
ence department, Prof. Richard
Musgrave of the economics de-
partment and Prof. Preston Slos-
son will discuss the subject
"Would the United States Find
Membership in a Revised United
Nations an Asset or a Liability."
Catholic Marriage
Talk To Be Today
The first in the series of mar-
riage lectures sponsored by the
Newman Club will be held at 7:30
p.m. today in the clubrooms of the
chapel.
The speaker of the evening will
be The Rev. F. Herbert Weir of
Detroit.

FOR RENT

BACHELOR APT. for 2 men. Private
bath, entrance. Garage. 2-7886. )9F
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend guestsnto the
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 E. Ann Phone 8144
FOR SALE
COMPLETE Ski Equipment. Excellent
condition, $20. 4141, 6-7 p.m. )66
MATCHED) tails and tuxedo, size 39L.
Excellent quality and condition. Dick
Schultz, 2-3256. )65
Juilliard Washable Corduroy Suits!!
In Twelve Shades Of Spring
Skirt $8.95 Jacket $16.95
COUSINS ON STATE STREET )1
IT'S COTTON PICKING TIME
Every Style. Color, and Fabric
you could wish for. Delightfully
Tubbable. Considerately priced $8.95-$25
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 South State Street )2
35 M.M. PROJECTORS
$32.50 Model made by VOKAR
While They Last-$9.95
About 40 In Stock
CALKINS FLETCHER DRUG CO. )7
SPECIAL AT SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
Navy T Shirts 49c
Army Officers "Pink" Shirts $6.75
Pink Trousers 100%1 Wool $14.95 )8
You'll be amazed if Ansco flash kits
satisfy. $22.49 bulbs included.
PURCHASE RADIO and CAMERA SHOP
Church and South U. Phone 8696
)20B
MODEL A FORD 1931, new differential,
seat covers, new battery and tires.
$150. Call 8859. 1052 Baldwin. )60
TELEVISION
RADIOS SERVICE
AERO RADIO SALES & SERVICE
Phone 4997 )7
'36 CHEVROLET Standard Sedan. Good
mechanical condition. Price asked,
$200.00. Call John Slater, 2-9318 or
2-6500. )55
BABY Parakeets and Canaries. Bird
supplies and cages. Moderate prices,
562 S. Seventh. Phone 5330. )

a'
SHERIFF JOE
with his pair of hounds
couldn't get the results
of a LOST and FOUND.
Call1 23-24-1
to order
CLASSIFIEDS
BOOKS
BARGAINS IN OLD BOOKS
On All Subjects - Good Browsing
5c and up
on the Mezzanine
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University 16
REAL ESTATE
BUY NOW-One acre or more. Terms if
wanted, good safe investment. A de,
sirable scenic spot to build your fu-
ture home. Information, owner, 25-
0656. )M
PERSONAL
SMOOTH!
DANCE MUSIC
Chuck Downer & Orch. Ph. 25-0031
)20P
SOCIAL CHAIRMEN: The Mack Fergu-
son Trio is now booking spring dates.
Leave calls at 2-4183. )13P
MERRY-Go-Round. Peter Pan Bras-
sieres. Sizes 32-36 ABC Cup. Randall's
306 S. State. )1oP
LATIN American student desires tu-
toring in English (conversation). Con-
tact Alvaro Pardo, Rm. 5, Cooley
House, East Quad, Ph. 2-4591. 21P
IF YOU SEE a man walking around the
campus wearing a big raccoon coat.
and waving an Illinois pennant, it's
our missing salesman. He carries five
Royal typewriters under that coat.
Office Equipment Co., 1116 So. Uni-
versity. )IB
Continuous From 1:30 P.M.

WANTED TO BUY
SKI BOOTS Wanted! Size 9. Will bnty
or exchange for size 10. 314 Strauss,
2-4591. )3D
-TYPING
TYPING WANTED-Rapid, accurate, at i
reasonable rates. Phone 2-3357. ) 1W
TYPING, accurately, promptly, expertly
done by student veteran's wife, Thesis
term papers, tax problems, legal
briefs, Hopwood manuscripts, stencis.
etc.1Free pick-up and delivery. Ph.
2-4155.)3
ROOMS FOR RENT
WEEKEND rooms available in private
homes. Call Student Room~ Bureau.,
2-8827, 11:30-12, 6:30-7:00. )R
PLEASANT front room for two male
students on campus. Phone 2-2052.
37R
QUIET well furnished large double
room for male students. Ph. 8746.
) 38R
SINGLE ROOM-Man. 300 ft.. from the
Engineering arch .Ph.23201 days.
39R
BUSINESS SERVICES
Electric Shaver Parts and Service
MOSLEY TYPEWRITER CO.
214 E. Washington )23B
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TAILORING
Orders Taken for
Any Type of Uniform
Reasonable Rates 2-2020
)3B
PIANO INSTRUCTION - Popular and
classical. Mrs. Hazel Wolfe Bross, 813
Hillcrest Drive, A.A. Beginners a spe-
cialty. Phone 2-6227. )22B
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks. Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2B
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B
WE PLAN TO BUILD
several exceptionally nice 3 bedroom
homes on beautiful ?z and 1 acre
sites. Only 3 minutes drive from
campus. Some will be for sale, others
for rent. For details address Michi-
gan Daily, Box 180. ) 16B

LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Ci e' r('tte lighter. Call 2-4401,
:317 A(Ians. Ask for Ken. Reward. ) IL
BLUE FABRIC WALLET lost in Burton
Tower on Feb. 28. Contents needed
desperately. Reward. Mary Hanound.
Ph. 2-7328. 1014 Vaughn St. )8L
LOST - Ladies gold Hamilton watch,
black elastic hand, (Ii ,raced - Mary
Lou Scanlon 6/21 /47. C di2-3839. 2L
HELP WANTED
SHOE SALESMAN -Experenced,fr
part time and Saturday selling. (all
2-6326. )131

_w -- -

The
UNION PEh'IR A
P R E SE N T S
It's 29th ilhsical (ion,,ed
March 23, 24, 25
MICHIG AN rfilEAII

8:30P.M.
ER
UNION DESK
Tues., Fri., 5-9 P.M
1Ch 25, SOLD OUT
sday, Thursday

$1.20

$1.80

A DOUBLE
"SISTER
ANGELIC)
o00
MARCI
BOX OFFICE OPENS TO
Lydia Mens

THE DEPARTMEN
presents
BILL OF OPERA B

WEDNESDAY
through
SATURDAY

T OF SPEECH
Y PUCCINI
"GIANNI 00
SCHICCHI" /0
- 8 P.M.
)__
CD/0o _

i

I

U

p

TICKETS ON SALE ATI
Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sat., 1-5 P.M --
$1.80 TICKETS FRIDAY, 31A1
Best seats available for Wedne

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

- I Now-

NOW PLAYING

MCHIGAN-

in conjunction with the School of Music
H 9, 10, 11 and 12, 1949
Tickets $1.50, $1.20, 90c (tax included
MORROW 10 A.M. - PHONE 6300
e sson Theatre

Continuous From 1 P.M.

I

"BETTER THAN HAMLET,' 'SIERRA MADRE,' or 'SNAKE PIT' "
-National Board of Review.
A terrifying insight into WITCHCRAFT, RELIGION, and ADULTERY.

Weekday
Matinees 25c
Today &

Evenings
& Sunday
Monday!

35c

ALL ABOARD...
F ROMANCE,
* ~MUS IC and FUN

~1

MIMW
DAY

of

Ri

TH

"Compared to "Day of Wrath,' 'Symphony Pas-
torale' is another cheap novie-Tomorrow Mag-
azine.
"One of the Most Remarkable Pictures in Recent
Years"-Life.
Cominq this weekend to

aa

k A ORS BE%
* ~A MNXWELF
G O RE SC H AY In Cha rge of P o ct O -7 ,

E

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