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October 01, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 1, 1948

1i

FRIDY, CT0E ,e14

LATIN, GREEK STUDIES:
Classical Courier Seeks
To Stimulate Education
By HERB ROVNER
The University Department of Classical Studies has for the past
six years been publishing a small mimeographed newspaper, The Clas-
sical Courier, which reaches some 700 Latin and Greek high school
teachers throughout Michigan and neighboring states.
Originally the paper sought only to acquaint Latin and Greek teach-
ers too far distant from the University with the activities of the Uni-
versity's classical department.
4 * * *
HOWEVER it now includes informative tips to these teachers on
how to stimulate an interest in Latin and Greek in high school stu-
dents.
In 1942, the first year of its publication, The Courier started
a campaign for the promotion of classical studies in a world of
scientific education.. In 1943 to further this plea, plans were
suggested for a Latin Week in the high schools which The Courier
hoped "would keep the public, particularly our prospective pupils,
aware of the nature and significance of.your work."
As a result, Latin Week was initiated in many Michigan high
schools and is annually observed, fostering an interest in the classics.
TODAY TEACHERS from this state, Ohio, and Illinois send fre-
quent contributions to The Courier describing devices which have
proved stimulating and effective in classroom practice.
The Courier under the ditorship of Professor Frank O. Copley of
the department continues its efforts in behalf of the classics as an im-
portant element in our educational program.
Sigma Rho Tau Plans Future

Daily-Graham
REGISTRATION RHYTHM-Pictured above is passibly the only note of harmony students found
in the entire registration marathon in Watermaa gymnasium. As a recruiting campaign the Men's
Glee Club played a program of its records for thse waiting to leap into the maelstrom. Catching
an earful are Dean Walter Rea (holding the envelope) and Glee Club Director Phillip Duey (wearing
the grin.)

Members of Sigma Rho Tau,
engineering stump speaker's fra-
ternity, held their first business
meeting to plan activities for the
coming year and elect committee
chairmen yesterday.
First of the organization's func-
4
" "
14 /iSII J 3 S-
r
-T SUPPL M.N
Multiple Vitamin Capsules
-TO SUPPLEMENT
YOUR DAILY DIET .. .

tions will be a smoker Tuesday at
the Michigan Union.
COMMITTEE chairmen elect-
ed for the current year are: Ed-
ward L. Kendall, membership;
Roger S. Markle, publicity; Rob-
ert S. Silverman, social; and Peter
J. Adams, research. Robert Skul-
stad and Howard Benedict wil
serve as co-chairmen of the
speaker's committee and Walter
Oberreit, as treasurer.
Ice Cream Social
An ice cream social will be spon-
sored by the Wesleyan Guild of
the Methodist Church at 8:00 p.m.
Friday on the church lawn.
In the event of rain the social
will be held in the social h sll.
Watch the price go up.
Buy now for FIVE-NCN.

Vet Patients
To See Game'
Via Red Cross
The annual "football-Saturday
hospiatlity for servicemen" spon-
sored by the Washtenaw County
Chapter of the American Red
Cross, gets under way tomorrow.
Brought here from Percy Jones
Hospital and Fort Custer to at-
te nd Michigan home football'
games, the men are entertained at
luncheons and dinners provided
through the cooperation of church
and fraternal groups.
* * *
ARRANGING the entertain-
ment schedule this year are Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Porter. Four
groups have made definite com-
mittments to provide hospitality,
while two more have made tenta-
tive plans.
Eighty men from Percy Jones
will be luncheon guests of the
First Presbyterian Church tomor-
row afternoon, and 135 men from
Fort Custer and Percy Jones will
be dined at the American Legion
Clubhouse.

Armed with arrows, fencing foils
and a full-size dinghy, the League
and Union are sailing into the
third day of their new extra-cur-
ricula program, "Activities Day"
on the second floor of the League.
The 17-booth exhibit will close
up shop tomorrow after the first
experiment in a graphic coordi-
nated display of campus extra-
curricula activities.
Progressives
To Hold Picnic
The Wallace Progressives will
sponsor a picnic from 6:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. today at the Isand.
The picnic is open to all stu-
dents on campus. The group wlil
meet at 6 p.m. at Hill Auditorium
to go out to the Island together.
The program will consist of a
picnic supper, community singing,
and entertainment.
Tickets are being sold at fifty,
cents each.

VENI, VIDI, (ONVENI:
League, Union Exhibit Will
Show Many Campus Activities

DIRECTED by Lois Steere and
Jack Kruse, the display includes
representative contributions from
many of the campus organiza-
tions.
The Sailing Club has present-
ed a fully-assembled sailboat,
the WAA has contributed arch-
ery targets and fencing gear
and The Daily dug up some 1890
newspapers from its files for the
display.
Highlighting the exhibition is a
replica in miniature of the Inter-
national Center, assembled by
members. They also contributed
for the university's perusal, the
sheafs of documents which they
were required to fill out when they
came here from their home coun-
tries.
* *, *
LEAGUE AND UNION officers
believe that the show is not only
pointing the way to freshmen, but
is also promoting better relations
among campus organizations, ac-
cording to Pat McKenna, League
president.

Biggest Jap,
U.S. Audience
Hears Suzuki
By ALICE BRINKMAN
Bunshiro Suzuki, a visiting Jap-
anese newspaper editor, yesterday
talked to probably the largest
single gathering of Americans in
the United States who understand
Japanese.
Many of the 40-member Jap-
anese-oriented audience in the
Rackham Building were graduate
students at the University's Jap-
anese Studies Center.
* * *
FOLLOWING THE Japanese
lecture, Suzuki translated the
main points of his address on
Woman's Place in Japanese So-
ciety for the benefit of The Daily.
"Japanese women have an im-
portant role in the homes for
democratization," Suzuki assert-
ed.
Contrary to popular opinion, he
said, women have always held
much influence in Japan, and at
present are gaining more.
"Over 15 women hold seats in
the House of Representatives and
the Diet. This is more than in
the United States," Suzuki point-
ed out.1
THEY WERE elected since April
1946 when Japanese womendvoted
for the first time, he stated.
They won the franchise and
equality under the new constitu-
tion.
Suzuki will return home shortly
to edit the new Japanese version
of the Reader's Digest. The de-
mand for the magazine is over 2
million. This is more than the cir-
culation of any other Japanese
publication, he said.
Urge Students
ClaimBooks
There are more than 600 un-
claimed books reposing in the
shelves of the Student Book Ex-
change.
Today is the last day for own-
ers to pick up their unsold texts.
The Exchange, whichswill beopen
from 3 to 5 p.m., is located in Rm.
3C, Michigan Union. All books
which are not claimed will be do-
nated to the International Center
for relief purposes.
Dale Drollinger, manager, will
mail out checks in two weeks to
those whose books were sold.
Press Club ...
(Continued from Page 1)
sity last week after serving as For-
eign Trade Administrator for the
Greek government; and GerdH.
Padel, University Press Club fellow
in Journalism from Switzerland.
The afternoon panel discus-
sion, also open to the public,
will feature talks on Michigan's
public health and welfare set-
up. Four officials from the state
government will' take part in
the panel which starts at 2:45
p.m. in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Visiting newsmen will also at-
tend a closed luncheon meeting
and a dinner. A special program
has been arranged for wives of
Press Club members.
For Freshmen, too-it's edited
for you-Ensian.

Autograph hunters must of ne-
cessity be biting their much
chewed pencils ahis week.
For display in the main library
are a collection of books and let-
ters presented to the library by the
English playwright and producer,
Maurice Browne.
THE PAPERS are inscribed to
Mr. Browne by such names as Va-
chel Lindsay, Paul Raynol, John
Masefield, George Bernard Shaw,
and oGeorge Arliss.
Two years ago Mr. brone was
musing over the problem of
what to do with his collection of
papers. His wife, also an actress
and producer, had graduated

from the University in the class
of 1904 so he decided to send his
letters, manuscripts, books, and
clippings of the theatrical world
to Michigan.
It was Maurice Browne and his
wife who in 1912 founded the Lit-
tle Theatre in Chicago and grad-
ually opened more across the
western United States experiment-
ing in plays and play production.
HE WENT ABROAD and has
since produced an dacted in Eng-
land. Paul Robeson was first cast
as Othello by Mr. Browne, and he
is the co-author with Robert Nich-
ols of the hit play "Wings Over
Europe."

FAMOUS NAMES:
Playwright's Private Papers
Featured in Library Display

I brar-y isplaysDocuments
..4
e - V

;
, ,

a

A few of the many volumes and
documents the University has re-
ceived from its alumni and friends
in the past ten years are on display
this month in the main library
showcases.
Ranging from actual photo-
graphs of minerals and butterflies
to a Japanese manuscript dated
1708, they include some of the
books and letters presented to the

library by the English playwright
and producer, Maurice Browne.
SHOWN ALSO are a few books
from the Stephen Spaulding Me-
( morial Collection which is com-
posed of manuscripts, many deal-
ing with early military science,
history source books, and books on.
varied othr subjects.
Part of the Hollands Memorial
Collection, including a Latin Bible
printed in 1492 is on display.

Gla~hm

Continuous from 1:30 P.M.
TODAY and SATURDAY!

r
COLOMBA P Ciy4~ . s
Ra ndolph Marguerite
SCOTT -CHAPMAN
GR C
GEORGE MACREADY/

--- Plus!

A HAL ROACH JOY HIT! "CURLEY"
Coming SUNDAY! "THE BRIDE GOES WILD"



k

SClassified Adverisi ng

DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT
STAG or DRAG
MASONIC T EM PLE
BEAT THE BAND
REDUCED RATES: To the Ladies prior to 9:00
"MEET ME AT THE TEMPLE"

FOR SALE
of
S1i F'Suvv I
DRUG STORE
304 S. State St.
"The Rexall Store
on the Campus"

EMPLOYMENT
TWO experienced baby sitters desire
regular or short notice work. Write
Box 136 for further particulars. )1E
HELP WANTED
SALESMAN, part-time and Saturday.
Men's clothing. Dixie Shop, 224 S.
Main. )8H
SODA Fountain Help. Mornings and
noon hours. 'Alexander Drugs. )6H
PART-TIME SHOE SALESMAN- Ex-
perience preferred. All day Sat. and
aft's. RANDALLS, 306 South State
Street. )4H
FOR RENT
SMALL furnished cottage at Winan's
Lake, Lakeland. Electric range, re-
frigerator, oil heat. Brighton 3375. ) 5R
FOR RENT - Football weekend guest
Rooms available. Call Student Room
Bureau, 2-8827; 11-12 a.m., 6:30-8 p.m.
)2R
AVAILABLE immediately. Double room
and study to share with male student.
Private residence. Half block from di-
rect bus line. Call evenings, 7-9, Ph.
8890. )4R
For Good Accommodations
Bring your overnight or
week-end guests to the
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 East Ann Phone 8144
)3R
WANTED TO BUY

PERSONAL
FOOTBALL FANS eat Saturday at Mem-
orial Christian Church, Hill at Tap-
pan. Complete plate lunch, 75c. )3P
DID YOU know this about RANDALLS
on State Street?
We have Bobbie Brooks Personalized
monogram sweaters. Slip over-$4.95
or cardigan--$7.95. , )2P
A. SPRING
Clocks Watches Jewelry Gifts
221 S. 4th Ave Ph. 4834
)4P
SENIORS!!
NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4
Photographers begin taking your
picture for the 1949 yearbook. Make
your appointment now-any after-
noon this week except Saturday,
2-5. Student Publications Building.
)1P
Organizations, sports, clubs,
candid shots--NCN.
BUSINESS SERVICES
MAKE RESERVATION now for care of
children during football games, Ph.
5918. *) 7B
ALTERATIONS - Restyling - Custom
clothes, Hildegarde Shoppe, 109 E.
Washington, Telephone 2-4669. )1B
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironifng done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Ph. 2-9020. ) 3B
BOUGHT AND SOLD-Men's used
clothing by Ben the Tailor at Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )5B
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS. Standards-
portables-Also Rented, Repaired. We
buy used Typewriters. Office Equip-
ment Service Co. 1116 S. Univ. Ph.
2-9409. 111 S 4th Ave ) 4B
SADDLE HORSES for hire. Student
rates, week days: $1.50 per hour. Also
horses boarded. Stable % mile south
of Ypsi Airport, corner of U.S. 23 and
U.S. 112 Phone A. W. Cowan, 2-2266 or
871W11 Ypsi )6B

WANTED TO RENT
GARAGE-Vicinity of 300 block Thomp-
son. Reply to Neil C. Bertram, 311.
Thompson St, Ann Arbor. )1N
WANTED
TALENT to form group for entertaining
at dances, radio, etc. Singers, danc-
ers, comedians, instrumentalists. Fri-
day, meet at Union Glee Club Room.
Call Jim Reiss, 2-5571. )7W
WANTED-1000 HEADS!!!
Be they square, round or flat
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State )5W
LOST AND FOUND
Raincoat taken by mistake Wednesday
from German Restaurant. Trade back
at restaurant or call 8512. )4L
LOST-Black Schaeffer Pen, wide gold
band, between E. Madison and Li-
brary Mon. nite. Call Ext. 2144. )2L
LOST-Ronson Cigarette Lighter, en-
graved Shirley. Write Shirley Nelson,
Dorm 8, Box 744, West Lodge, Ypsi-
lanti. )9L
LOST-H. N. White Flute. Monday
morning in Angell Hall. Reward.
Phone or write 117 Lloyd House, West
Quad. )3L
LOST-9-28-48 near Miller's on S. Uni-
versity. Parker 51 transparent pen.
Name on barrel: Jo Carroll Moore.
Reward. Please return to Overbeck
Bookstore. )5L
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Used Bicycle, 2-2819. )65
FOR SALE--Man's Bike. Phone 2-9376.
)77
CROSLEY - 1947, excellent condition.
Ph. 9559 .after 6:30 p.m. )73
1934 FORD Tudor, new motor and tires.
Radio, heater and seat covers. Ph.
8341 ) 78
WHIZZER Motor Bike. Good cond. New
paint, saddle. 2025 Hill St. Ph. 2-6965.
67

I 1X'4?T' thin, t 4.4hike,,with

2-7438,430 nrosen
2-7438, 430 Cross.

basket. Call
)15

FOR SALE
PAIR of Season Choral Union Tickets.
Main floor, section 5. Ph. 2-4309. )64
WEBSTER Record Changer. Ex. cond.
Reasonable price. 1204 Oakland. Ph.
2-5275. )66
TWO REMINGTON Noiseless Typewrit-
ers, riot portables. Phone 7468 after
6 p.m. )62
GOLF CLUBS and Bag, good condition.
Also man's Gladstone leather bag.
Phone 2-0928. )61
DIAMOND Ring. .25 Carat. Baguettes.
White gold mount, yellow gold band.
$150, sell $120. Box 135. )76
1936 NASH, good condition, new tires,
clean throughout. Call Parsons, 3-1511
Ext. 361. )75
1935 DeSOTO. - Mechanically sound.
Must sell immediately. $250.00. Phone
C. Geib, 25-9502. )74
CAMERA-Kodak Bantam Special; f.2
lens; speeds up to 1/500 second; $95.00.
Call Ed Sprague, 2-6671. )81
1935 CHEVROLET, 2-door, deluxe. Very
good condition, heater. Call Elkins,
2-3481 evenings. Make an offer. )20
TYPEWRITER, practically new, noise-
less Remington. Full-size. 1208 Gran-
ger. ) 82
1939 MERCURY Rebuilt motor. New
transmission, new tires. Lou Allen.
708 E. Kingsley. )26
PAIR LADIES English Riding Boots.
Tan, size 71. Pr. Ladies tan riding
pants, ripcord, leather reinforced. Ph.
7265. ) 70
1936 CHEVROLET Standard Two door.
Excellent mechanical condition. Body
fair. Two new tires and heater. Ph.
Ypsi 3977J4 after 5:30 weekdays. )80
BABY PARAKEETS-Beautiful singing
canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
Ruffins Melody Bird Shop, 562 S. 7th.
)18
PURE BRED GREAT DANE
6 mos. Broke. Handles well
Excellent Health. Dark Brindle.
Male. Call 8856 after 7 p.m.
)49
MICROSCOPE-Mechanical stage and
carrying case. English make-Good
price-$65. Afternoon or evenings
Ph. 2-2105 or Apt. 1, 714 S. State St.
) 37
ESTABLISHED Sandwich Service for
Fraternities, Sororities, and Dormi-
tories. Good profits. Call 7211 at
mealtimes. ) 50
Need a Good Place to Live?
Louis trailer, 1946 24-ft. Admiral, is
ready to move into behind 1880 Pack-
ard. Reduced price. Terms )51
INTRODUCTORY OFFER. Reader's Di-
gest. 7 mos., $1.00, plus free gift book.
Brauff Agency
1257 Sudbury
Willow Village )83
'Those good-looking Cravenetted rain-
coats at the ELIZABETH DILLON
SHOP give you such a lovely way to
be caught in the rain. Priced from

MICHIGAN

Continuous
Daily
from 1P.M.

, , .s .,, ,

Weekdays
35c to 5 P.M.

MKIE l
ZZIEMM

i

r

7,

Playing through Saturday
35c until 5 P.M.

ART CINEMA LEAGUE

presents

7 MUSICAL STARS -
iSONG HITS
ROY ROGERS + DENNIS DAY
starrng in "Pecos Bill as "Johnny Applesee"
c y 7 '// THE ANDiEWS SISTERS
Frances LANGFORD - Freddy MARTIN!
Also- ETHEL SMITH - BUDDY CLARK
-------Also
SONS OF THE PIONEERS u s~.. ,
"MAN FROM NEW ORLEANS" FRED WARING'S Pennsylvanians
GNU LOOK - SPORTS - NEWS THE DINNING SISTERS

YOU CAN DINE OUT FREQUENTLY!
at the Newly Remodeled
STAGE COACH INN
(Formerly Red Coach Inn)

MORRI LL'S

314 S. State St.

Call 7177

Coming
Sunday!

JACK CARSON -- DORIS DAY
"ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS"

I

Our low prices per-
mit you to enjoy res-
taurant meals often.
REMEMBER
Doors Are Open from

..
r +f

li

MRnANDOPENING
Modern and Oldtime Dancing

kwmd by FILM RIGHTS INTERNATIONAL, LTD. I 11:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. for LUNCH
A.2 ft '~r ii AN "n i'r nY X/l -- TX~NTXTUDr

Starting

ARMORY

Starting

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