100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ruIDY~ OTOBEt~ ~ 198 PA~E-TI--

FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 1,, 1948+

'TIE ,IICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THRE

.

THE 'LIT' BABY:
Humanities Course Enters Second Year

V AUGHAN BIG PARTY:
'Vickie' Vaughan Coeds Plan
Fete for Dispossessed Males

4.9

The much-discussed "baby" of
the Literary College curriculum
celebrates its first birthday this
fall.
Humanities 1 and 2, or the
"Great Books Course," is now en-
tering the second year of a
planned two-year trial period,
with Prof. Clark Hopkins of the
Classified Studies Department
continuing as chairman.
FUTURE PLANS for the course
are still in committee stage, Prof.
Hopkins said, but its success last
year indicates that Humanities
will be extended and possibly
opened to a limited number of
upperclassmen.
There are now eight sections
of Humanities, as compared with

seven last year. All classes are
limited to between twenty-five
and thirty students, in order to
promote free discussion and an
informal atmosphere.j
Instructors for the course are
drawn from the departments of
English, classics, Romance lan-
guages, philosophy, history, and
German. One nwajor difficulty,
Prof. Hopkins stated, is in obtain-
ing enough instructors, since most
departments are crowded and in
need of all their members.
* * *
ONE HOPEFUL SIGN which
will facilitate broadening of the
Humanities course is the increased
number of inexpensive editions of
the classics. Another more im-
portant one is the enthusiasm felt

by most of the students and teach-
ers who took part in the "experi-
ment" last year.
As a result of the Great Books
course, some two hundred of
this year's sophomores are ac-
quainted with books that many
people never even touch in four
years of college.
Some have formed a better idea
of a subject in which to specialize;
all can return to the study of
Homer and Plato, Dante and
Shakespeare, with some degree of
insight and understanding.
Similar courses have been suc-
cessful at other universities, in-
cluding Harvard, Columbia, and
Chicago; and all signs point to a
bright future for Humanities.

M VJC-

. (14MA
v A~o

P DV: :{
/3
_ At
x}
t Y t
* */~ p t
ag.
z tIf

REFUSES TO ANSWER-Rus-
sell A. Nixon, Washington rep-
resentative of the CIO United
Electrical Workers, tries to make
a statement before a house labor
committee at Washington. He
was ordered from the stand for
refusing to say whether he is or
has been a Communist.
Boak Joins Group
The Comite international de
Papyrologie announced yesterday
that Professor A. E. R. Boak of
the History Department has been
appointed as one of its members.
The Comite, which was estab-
lished in 1930, directs the Associa-
tion internationale de Papyrolo-
gues' and the international con-
gresses of papyrology.

By LILLIAN DRAZEK
Former Vaughan men will have
the opportunity to refresh their
memories of the House's interior-
and check its care in female hand,
when the coeds of "Vickie"
Vaughan hold open house for
their benefit from 3 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day.
Hostesses, headed by Beverly
Garthe, '52, will "reiamiliarize"
the men with the dorm and keep
in check those who may feel they
never left "home."
* * .* -
NAME TAGS with room num-
bers of the present and former oc-
cupants of the rooms will be worn
by all, so that the credit-or re-
sponsibility-for the condition of
the rooms can be fixed.
"The 'wrinkled look' will be
absent when we entertain Sun-
day," Florence Baron, '50, So-
cial Committee chairman said,
as she described the long lines
that have been forming to use
the house's two irons.
Realizing perhaps that the food
In the early days of the settling
of this country, the principle value
of the beaver fur was in making
men's hats. According to the En-
cyclopedia Americana, had a way
to make toppers of silk been in-
vented, the beaver would have long
since become extinct. Looks like
the beavers owe the silk worms a
handshake.

1948-49, LECTURE

URS

of the >"exile" is not like that of
former days, Mary Jane Wheeler,
'51, and her refreshment com-
mittee, have special plans to satis-
fy the men's appetites.
A TASTE of "Vickie" Vaughan
entertainment will also be on the
program. Organization of the pro-
gram has been undertaken by Jac-
queline Olivier, '50. Jay Golds-
worty, '50, is supervising the dec-
orations.

current%
O N S AVIN G S
...insured to $5,000.
Any amount opens
your account at
ANN ARBOR
Savings and Loan Assn.
116 N. Fourth Avenue
Opposite the Assets Ove.
Cowl House $11,000,000

WOMEN IN THE NEWS

116 So- U.

Office Equipment
Service Co.
(in Ulrich's Annex)
ROYAL
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER
Introductory Offer
Foreign Keyboards
at no extra cost
TYPEWRITER RENTALS

Phone 2-9409

0 Cashmere - Angora - Wool
SWEATERS
Unmatched cashmeres in both cardigan or slipover
styles in pink, blue, tan, white, olive, gold, and aqua.
Also cuddly angoras and virgin wools for sizes 34-40.
$4.00 to $18.95
® Wool - Gabardine - Corduroy
g SKIRTS
Flared or straight corduroys, wools and crepes in
black, brown or high shades. Also tweed mixtures.
Sizes 10 to 20. $6.00 to $12.95.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

'R
,
"'" A i
'
" ,r.._._
" i

PLAID SHIRTS
Pick a bold, bright plaid in a
handsome classic shirt with
long or short sleeves. In San-
forized cotton for sizes 32 to
38. $4.00 to $6.00.
" Charge
" Layaway
9 61Za,4e

S'

\

i

t

/
i
} J
,_

()
;,1

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of
the Assistant to the President, Room
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the
day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
Notices
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1948
VOL. LIX, No. 10
Faculty Meeting, College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts.
4:10 p.m., Oct. 3, Rm. 1025 Angell
Hall.
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes
of the meeting of Jun 7, 1948 (pp.
1433-1434).
2. Presentation of new mem-
bers.
3. Resolutions for Professors E.
L. Adams, J. W. Bradshaw, J. L.
Brumm, L. C. Karpinski, and M.
S. Pargment.
4. Memorial for Professor Em-
eritus Wilber R. Humphreys.
5. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this
meeting.
a. Executive Committee-Prof.
C. D. Thorpe.
b. Executive Board of the Grad-
uate School-Prof. R. C. Angell.
c. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston. No report.
6. Announcements.
7. New business.
University Directory changes
cannot be accepted after October
4.

will be open to return all unsold
books from 3-5 p.m., Fri., Oct. 1.
All books not claimed by tonight
will be turned over to relief.
Choral Union Ushers: The fol-
lowing second balcony ushers,
stage, program and ticket takers
report for assignments today at
Hill Auditorium Box Office be-
tween 5-6 p.m.
Carolyn Ackerman, James K.
Anderson, Donald Autore, Robert
B. Bentley, Melvin Bondy, Doro-
thy Calhoun, Morris Caminer,
John A. Carter, Joseph Cochin,
Mary Elizabeth Corin, Herbert
Crandell, Harold Daum, Stanley
James Dean, Dorothy Dice, Don-
ald W. Dickison, Arlene B. Didier,
Victor Dunaitis, Jeane Duncan,
Evelyn Dworsky, Roger C. Easton,
Mary Lee Fretz, Thomas Fritchek,
Walter L. Galson, Riva Genfan,
Edith Gisser, Grant K. Goodman,
Helen Grossfeld, Donald Patrick
Hallisey, John L. Hammersmith,
Robert A. Harris, Ellis B. Hayden,
Arnold Held, Sheldon W. Henry,
Rhoda Joy Horwitz.
Robert Jacobs, Josef Jahn,
Norman Jimerson, Ivan T.
Kaufman, Vivian Keidan, F.
G. Knight, William Lenxner,
Charles La Perriere, Barbara
Laun, Edward Lautner, Mary
Ellen Lavely, John D. Leadbetter,
Herbert Leiman, Valerie Lemper,
Gail Locken, V. A. Lowenberg,
Ruth E. McGugan, Robert A. Ma-
rietta, William F. Mennick, Pa-
tricia Merritt, Frank E. Miller,
Marilyn Moran, Helen Olsher,
Florence Olson, David Otto, Wil-
bur J. Perry, Jane Peterson, Marg
Peterson, Robert C. Porter, Wil-
liam O. Puro.
Harold W. Rehm, Frederick M.
Remley, Dorothy Roberts, Alfred
Rose, Virginia Anne Ross, James
B. Roszel, Stanley H. Saulson,
Robert N. Schafer, Dorothy J.
Shaler, Mary Shawley, Noah Sher-
man, Katherine Smith, Rod Sni-
der, Leon Sparling, Richard L.
Stanfield, Judith M. Starr, Alice
(Continued on Page 4)

Noted Actress
-Entertainment at its best
"Wives of Henry VIII"
Feb. 24
Complete Course - 7 Numbei
Box Office Open Daily, 1

"The Meaning of Treason"
"Famous Trials"
Nov. 10

GLOIlI

Cornelia Otis Rebecca West Eve Curie
Skinner Famous Author of Eminent French Jou

of Distinction -$7.50, $6.30, $5.10 (tax inc1i.
- 1, 2 - 5 Closed Sat. P.M. and Sun.

"France-Struggle for
Civilization"
March 3

H I L L

A U D I T 0 R I U M

rnalist

Sop

309 SOUTH STATE STREET

s.
rI
Sleepy- Timer
PAJAMAS
and DORMITORY
ENSEMBLE

M..',r.

IFC Student Book

Exchange

It's 6

is a great
eia rette-
cool, mild and
f11 flavored"

Pretty Intimate Bed-Time Apparel
Left: Candy stripe flannelette pajamas with a Peter
Pan collar in red and white, blue and white; sizes 10
to 20.
4.95
Right: Three-piece rayon crepe lounge and dormi-
tory set . . . two-piece man-tailored pajamas and a
study coat in red, nauy, or wine; sizes 14 to 18.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan