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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.PA+GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1948

..

, .

SAVE THAT CASH:
Data on Rent Control
,Now Available to Students

EDITOR'S NOTE: Because of the un-
precedented demand for student
'housing and the confusion existing
I regard to rent control, The Daily
prints the following description of
the types of student dwellings under
the provisions of rent control law.
By JAKE HURWITZ
The record enrollment has made
for a tight squeeze in providing
proper housing for Ann Arborites
this fall, but a few facts on rent
control may save you some of that
rapidly, vanishing currency.
Students who have sleeping9
rooms in rooming houses and
apartments which have been rent-;
ed in the past are registered in the
Area Rent Control Office, Rm. 5041
First National Building, and will
remain under control, accordingi
to William W. Hamilton, area rent
representative.
* * *
"STUDENTS WHO wish .to de-i
termine the legal maximum rent,
for quarters they occupy may do1
so by calling the area office,"
Hamilton said.
He explained that the follow-f
ing types of housing were decon-
trolled when the new rent con-
trol law went into effect last
spring-
1. Accommodations in hotels as
defined in the laws and regula-
tions;
2. Motor courts which were such
on June 30, 1947;1
3. Tourist homes servingt
transient guests exclusively onc
June 30, 1947;i
4. Trailers or trailer spaces; 1
5. New construction completed
or conversions (as defined in the

law and regulations) created after
February 1, 1947;
6. New construction completed
between February 1, 1945 and Feb-
ruary 1, 1947, and unrented be-
tween the completion date and
June 30, 1947;
7. Housing accommodations
not rented for any successive 24-
month period from February 1,
1945 to March 30, 1948;
8. Non-housekeeping furnished
rooms in private homes, but only
if there are no more than two pay-
ing tenants who are not members
of the landlord's immediate fam-
ily and if the remaining portion of
the dwelling unit is occupied by
the landlord or his immediate
family.F
* * *
DWELLING UNITS of these
types were removed from control
to induce property owners to put
additional accommodations on
the rental market, Hamilton de-
clared. All. rental properties not
in the foregoing categories, how-
ever, are under federal rent con-
trol, he emphasized.
Additional information con-
cerning the provisions of the rent
act governing leases, evictions
and other matters is available at
the area office.
Explorers in Eastern Malaya
have reported finding individuals
of the paleontalic elephant spe-
cies which possessed five toes, an
infrequent occurence among ele-
phants of the Southern Pacific re-
gions.
Clayton's Eencyclopedia

SUMMER ON THE RIVIERA-A group of smiling University students basks in the warmth of the
Gold Coast sun. These gleeful Wolverines are among those travelers whom the NSA has invited
to a meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the Union to rehash experiences on the trip abroad. The NSA has
asked all students who traveled in foreign countries this summer to attend. Scheduled for discus-
sion are educational facilities and the general situation in the countries visited,.
* * * *

Foreign Students Get the Dope
On Intricacies of 'U' Football
It's not elation that makes the referee wave his arms that way.
A pre-game huddle on the why and wherefore of football will be
held at 8 p.m. Thursday in the International Center to help bring all
neophytes into the fold.
Under the sponsorship of the NSA and ISA, this is the first in a
series of programs designed to make foreign students on campus feel
more at home in their new environment. American students are also
invited to join in.
* * *
THE FOOTBALL ORIENTATION will consist of a talk by Howard
Leibee, assistant supervisor of physical education. Leibee will illustrate
his explanations with diagrams, Rose Bowl films and other visual aids.
Lucille B. Weisberg, chairman of the NSA sub-committee on
Foreign Student Hospitality will supervise the orientation programs.
Persons interested in co-operating with her in this area may call her at
2-0438.

Ace eporlters
Will Analyze
World Events
Robert Magidoff and Raymond
Gram Swing, two top-ranking
corfimentators, are scheduled to
speak in Ann Arbor this fall, as
part of the current Oratorical Lec-
ture Series.
Magidoff, who made the head-
lines last April after his expulsion
from Soviet Russia on spy charges,
will discuss the deportation in his
lecture October 12, at Hill Audi-
torium. An AP representative for
many years, Magidoff was put on
the air by NBC to broadcast daily
from Moscow. His voice is f a-
miliar to millions of Americans
who listened to him during the
war.
As a veteran reporter of both
World Wars, Raymond Gram
Swing won a greater radio audi-
ence than any otherhnon-political
personality. He is the first com-
mentator to have won the two
"Oscars" of broadcasting, the Du-
pont and Peabody awards.
HIS LECTURE "History on the
March," will appraise the clashes
and crises in the world picture to-
day. Mr. Swing will be the second
attraction of the season appear-
ing Nov. 1.
Five other speakers who are in-
cluded in the lecture course this
season are Rebecca West, John
Mason Brown, Cornelia Otis Skin-
ner, Eve Curie and Herbert Agar.
Tickets for the complete course
are now on sale at Hill Auditorium
box office which is open from 10-1,
2-5 daily except Saturday after-
noon and Sunday.

'U' Rubbernecks To Compare
Experiences at Metting Toniaht
American students who were abroad this summer will have a
chance to compare notes tonight at a meeting sponsored by the Uni-
versity NSA committee.
The meeting will be held at 7:30 p:m in Rm. 3A of the Union and
will be open to all students who traveled, worked or studied in foreign
countries this summer, according to Harvey Weisberg, Michigan di-
rector of NSA.
* * *
"WE HOPE TO GET a cross section of opinion about conditions
in Europe from people who have had first hand experience," Weisberg
said.
The NSA plans to set up a catalog of students who were out
of the country this summer, possibly to be used to fill speakers
engagements, Weisberg said.
"We plan to discuss conditions of interest to the campus, such
as educational facilities systems in Europe, as well as the general
situation," Weisberg added.
* * *
THE NSA HAS PLANNED a meeting October 24 in conjunction
with the Unitarians and the campus United Nations Committee where
Michigan students and others who were in foreign countries this
summer will get a change to tell the public about their experriences.

Faculty Plans
Talk on Rhodes
Scholarships
Ex-Rhodes Scholars
To Address Students
By FREDI WINTERS
Every autumn a group of hope-
ful students meet in Rm. 2003 An-
gell Hall to learn the requirements
and procedures for becoming a
Rhodes Scholar.
This year the meeting will be at
4:10 p.m. tomorrow, and Profes-
sors Hopkins, Seager and Laing
will be on hand to explain the
Rhodes Scholarships.
Annually, 32 American male
'citizens who can meet the quali-
fications originally set up by
empire builder Cecil Rhodes, are
given an opportunity for two
years' study at Oxford .Univer-
sity in England.
In normal times a student ap-
plying for the scholarship must
be between the ages of 19 and 25,
unmarried and a resident of the
U.S. for at least five years. He
must have attained at least junior
standing in college.
HOWEVER, SINCE the war,
special War Service Scholarships
have been offered which ease these
requirements for veterans. Ex-
servicemen applying may be mar-
ried, and need only be sophomores.
Appointments are made for two
years, but if a student shows spe-
cial ability a third year of study
may be awarded.
Rhodes, who provided funds for
the scholarships in his will, hoped
that Rhodes Scholars would be a
power in their countries for bring-
ing the world together.
TodTHIS END he set up certain
standards which are still used in
determining which students are
chosen. These include literary
and scholastic ability and attain-
ment, qualities of manhood, nmoral
force of character, leadership in-
stincts, interest in schoolmates,
physical vigour.
Those awarded scholarships
may follow any course of study of-
fered at Oxford, leading either to
a B.A. or more advanced degree.
The Medusa Herbiata, a variety
of fern found in the swamps of
Louisiana, was once considered by
Frenchmen as poisonous to any
human touching it.
-Brindley's iriaiy References.S

Foreign Duties Call Medical
acultymen from Michigan
Two members of 'the Medical School faculty have been granted
leaves-of-absence by the University to perform services in opposiate
parts of the globe.
Dr. Albert C. Furstenberg, Dean of the Medical School, is leaving to-
day for a six weeks trip to Japan and Korea where he will serve as spe-
cial consultant to the surgeon general of the United States Army theire.
Dr. Max Peet, professor of surgery, sailed for Europe Friday on
the liner "New Amsterdam" to act as chief speaker at the French Sur-
gical Congress in Paris.
DEAN FURSTENBERG will assist in organizing programs of po,-
graduate medical education in the army hospitals in Japan and Borea.
Dean Furstenberg's other duties as special consultaj, to the
surgeon general will include making ward rounds ant. attending
seminars and conferences with those in charge of the patients in
army hospitals in Japan and Korea.
Dr. Peet will speak on hypertension at the French Surgical Con-
gress in Paris. After the Surgical Congress adjourns, he will visit
clinics in Holland, Belgium, France and England and may perform op-

I

erations at some of the clinics.
Asenttee Vote/
Drive Pl'anned
An intensive program to pro-
mote a large absentee vote on
campus has been inaugurated by
the Young Democrats.
Each member of the club will
receive applications for absentee
ballots from eligible students
which will be sent to the proper
state authorities.
For those students whose homes
are in states which require that
the application be notarized, the
group plans to set up a notary
public service at a convenient
location on campus.
Students wishing to phone in
their applications may do so by
calling Harry Allbrecht at the
Law Club, 4145.

Soop Heads Drive
The special gift division for the
University in the 1949 Commu-
nity Chest Fund Drive will be di-
rected by Everett J. Soop, Direc-
tor of the University Extension
Service, it was announced by
Professor John Arthos, University
campaign director.
II 5

STAGE COACH
INN
AA STEAKS - SEA FOODS
FRIED CHICKEN
PARTIES - BANQUETS
RECEPTIONS
For Reservations Call 6004
503 East Huron St.
MICHIGAN

i

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LAST TWO DAYS

Chianber Music
Course Scheduled
"Chamber Music for Recreation"
is the title of a new course being
offered by the University Exten-
sion Service.
The eight-week, non-credit class
is under the direction of Prof.
Oliver Edel of the School of Music,
and at 7 p.m. each Tuesday in
Rm. 1022, University High.
The group has extended an in-
vitation of all interested stringed
instrument players to attend the
second meeting this week.
A $3.00 fee has been set for
members.

+ Classified Advertising +

Campus
Calendar
Association of Independent Men
-Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Tues., Rm.
3N, Union.
League Personnel Committee-
Meeting of all women interested in
ushering and hospital volunteer
work, 4 p.m. Tues., Michigan
League.
Canterbury Club - Holy Com-
munion followed by breakfast,
7:15 a.m. Wednesday, Student
Center.
Michigan Theatre-"Key Lar-
go," 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
State Theatre-"Melody Time,"
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
Non-Credit Art Course
Spened to 'Ii1"Students
An eight weeks art course, de-
signed for those interested in cre-
ative work in painting and com-
position has been opened by the
University Extension Services.
Under the instruction of Mr.
Paul Jones, the class will meet
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in Room 415
of the architecture building, begin-
ning September 28.

FOR SALE
RIDING EQUIPMENT: pr. ladies Eng-
lish boots, tan, size 7%; pr. men's
boots, black, size 9%; pr. ladies
breeches, tan whipcord, leather re-
inforced. Reasonable. Phone 7265.
)38
FLY HOME WEEKENDS
Luscombe Silvaire Deluxe Completely
equipped. A 1 condition. Sacrifice
$850 Phone 2-03004
)42
1935 CHEVROLET 2-door Deluxe. Very
good condition, heater. Call Elkins,
2-3481 evenings. Make an offer. )20
TWO $75 MEN'S SUITS both for $65;
size 38 regular. Natural gabardine
and a Glen plaid. Any week night
from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 311
Thompson, Apt. 3. ) 48
PURE BRED GREAT DANE
6 mos. Broke. Handles well
Excellent Health. Dark Brindle.
Male. Call 8856 after 7 p.m.
)49
WHIZZER Motor Bike for Sale. In good
condition, approx. $90. Phone 2-5184;
615 E. U. )57
MICROSCOPE-Mechanical stage and
carrying case. English make-Good
price-465. Afternoon or evenings
Ph. 2-2105 or Apt. 1, 714 S. State St.
)37
TYPEWRITER--Factory rebuilt. Guar-
anteed 1 year. Also language type
machine $50 and up. Portables. Aero
Radio. 335 S. Main. )28
1946 FORD V-8 sup-deluxe 2-dr sedan.
Clean, excellent condition. Ph.
25-9545. )60
BINOCULARS-Brand new 6x30 Uni-
versals with coated optics-Best of-
fer over $66. M. Stilleman, 9179. )50
ENGLISH made Norton Motorcycle
Model 18, 500 cc., 1946. Excellent con-
dition. Very reasonable. Ph. 2-3385.
)58
HOUSE TRAILER-28ft.-1946. Lived
in only 3 mo. Cost $3200. Sell for
$1860. See at 1472 Springfield, Willow
Run. ) 43
ESTABLISHED Sandwich Service for
Fraternities, Sororities, and Dormi-
tories. Good profits. Call 7211 at
mealtimes. )50
Need a Good Place to Live?
Louis trailer, 1946 24-ft. Admiral, is
ready to move into behind 1880 Pack-
ard. Reduced price. Terms )51
1937 FORD TUDOR; Clean. Dependable
transportation -for $280.00. Call 4145,
Room D-36 Lawyers Club )52
DODGE 4-door-'37 - New Engine,
front end, tires. See at 1379 Juansea,
Willow Village or contact Gil Vickers

FOR SALE
YOUR PRINTZESS ZIPTOPPER takes
the weather in its stride It's weath-
er wise for the Michigan campus.
Exclusively yours at The Elizabeth
Dillon Shop. )1
DID YOU know this about RANDALLS
on State Street?
We have Bobbie Brooks Personalized
monogram sweaters: Slip over-$4.95
or cardigan-$7.95. )2P
SCARVES
ACCORDIAN PLEATED
PURE SILK PRINTS
$2.95
SHADED AND SOLID COLORS
$1.95
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
COMPLETE HOSIERY LINES
newest shades -- every size
SMARTEST HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Building
)15
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS - Restyling - Custom
clothes,. Hildegarde Shoppe, 109 E.
Washington,dTelephone 2-4669. )1B
IMESSMAKING-Custom-mode suits,
Tailoring and Alterations. Specializ-
ing in Tailor-made buttonholes. Ph,
2-6583. )2B
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Ph. 2-9020. )3B
SADDLE HORSES for hire. Student
rates, week days: $1.50 per hour. Also
horses boarded. Stable % mile south
of Ypsi Airport, corner of U.S. 23 and
U.S. 112 Phone A. W. Cowan, 2-2266 or
871W11 Ypsi )6B
BOUGHT AND SOLD--Men's used
clothing by Ben the Tailor at Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington.
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS. Standards-
portables solo-Rented-Repaired. We
ment Service r lhofMZK-E
buy used Typewriters. Office Equip-
ment Service Co. 1116 S. Univ. Ph.
2-9409. 111 S 4th Ave )4B
FOR SALE
1939 MERCURY Rebuilt motor. New
transmission, new tires. Lou Allen.
708 E. Kingsley. )26
BABY PARAKEETS-Beautiful singing
canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
Ruffins Melody Bird Shop, 562 S. 7th.
)18
FOR RENT
FOR RENT to two female grads. Two
Room Suite, bedroom and combina-
tion sitting room-study. Two blocks
from Angell Hall. Call 744 after 6:30
p.m. )1R

HELP WANTED
CARRIERS for the Michigan Daily at
Willow Village. Contact Aurand, 1560
Tully Ct. after 5:00 p.m. )1H
SALESLADIES
FULL TIME OR PART TIME
Hrs. 9 a.11m.-5:30 p.m.
Daily Rest Periods
Vacation with Pay
Discount on Merchandise Purchases
S. S. KRESGE DOLLAR STORE
200 South Main )11H
SODA Fountain Help. Mornings and
noon hours. Alexander Drugs. )6H
REFRIGERATOR
SALES AND SERVICE MAN
Established Business 216 E. Huron
)3H
STUDENT FAMILIAR with a hammer,
Saw and Ruler to work afternoons
first semester. Phone 2-3466.
)I5H
PART-TIME SHOE SALEMEMAN Ex-
perience preferred. All day Sat. and
aft's. RANDALLS, 306 South State
Street. )4H
YOUNG LADY for secretarial work.
Shorthand and typing essential. Full
or part-time. Ph. 8601. )H
WANTED TO RENT
WILL SWAP Apartment on campus for
one in Grand Rapids. Contact Box
134, Michigan Daily by Thursday
noon. )iM

LOST AND FOUND
BRISK WEATHER recalls to mind new
topcoat which disappeared late last
term. Name inside, printed ineradi-
cably. Generous reward for info.
leading to recovery. Call Irv. Hel-
lenga at 2-4200. )8L
$25 REWARD-Return of 1947 ,M-Class
Ring. Initials J. S. Cassis. No ques-
tions asked! Lost in Union. 2-0575
)6L
LOST: Sat., Sept. 18 on Beer Mt. Blue
Navy shirt and 2 scarves. Ph. 2-4561.
Rm. 464 )5L
LOST: Small Gold Ring set with red
carved carnelian. Ph. 2-4055. or Univ.
Ex. 358 )3L
LOST: Sun Glasses. Black Frames. Pre-
scription lens. Ula Crull, West Lodge,
WRV, Ypsilanti. )2L
LOST: Pink gold Hampton Wrist
Watch. Lost near East Quad. Harold
Sperlich, 210 Prescott, East Quad. Re-
ward )lL
LOST - Prescription Ray-Van Sun
Glasses on Det. Bus, 2 a.m., Mon. Re-
ward. Call Oliver 2-3343. ) 13L
SLIDE RULE lost in vicinity of West
Engine. Finder please call 8257.
)7L
PERSONAL
A. SPRING
Clocks Watches' Jewelry Gifts
221 S. 4th Ave Ph. 4834
4P
SENIORS!
If you want your picture, degree,
hometown in the 1949 Michiganen-
sian make an appointment any after-
noon this week except Saturday at
Ensian $usiness Office. )1P

"GOOD) FOOD"
The DN
Open_-7:30 A.M.
'til Midnite
Breakfast at 7:30 A.M.
Lunch at 11 A.M.
Dinner at 5 P.M.
Also delicious snacks for
in-between
GOOD COFFE
Still 5c at the
DEN
1311 So. U., Across from Witham';

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Feature Times: 1:15-3:17-5:16-7:21 and 9:26
Five Big Stars in a Hit You'll Never Forget!
Humphrey y
Ed:-n-d G.
Luuren
-,V -
with LIONEL BARRYMORE " CLAIRE TREVOR
ADDED * CARTOON * NEWS
Thursday! DANA ANDREWS "DEEP WATERS"
COMING MONDAY, OCT. 11th, 8:15 P.M.
PEASE AUDITORIUM ... YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN
featuring stars of stage and scree
and a magnificent choir

{

I

35c to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
o Lit NOW
0
ROY ROGERS
DENNIS DAY
The ANDREWS
SISTERS
Frances
LANGFORD
Freddy MARTIN
/ ETHEL SMITH
BUDDY CLARK
SONS OF THE PIONEERS
r" FRED WARING'S Pennsylvanians
THE DINNING SISTERS
SONG HITS
11 MUSICAL
STAR'!-.

Enclose self-addressed stamped envelope.
Make checks payable to Universal Artists.
Mail to Swing Symphony Shop, 519 W. Cross St., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Prices - $2.40 - $1.80 - $1.20 (tax incl.)
Auspices Michigan State Normal College

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Return Engagement of Three Popular Speakers
University of Michigan Oratorical Association
1948-49 LECTURE COURSE

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads
CoEAL
ART
Ca'e ted*a
338 MAYNARD STREET

Cornelia Otis SKINNER

John Mason BROWN Eve CURIE

COMPLETE COURSE . . . 7 NUMBERS OF DISTINCTION

OCT. 12-ROBERT MAGIDOFF
Former AP representative in Russia; recently
NBC Moscow Correspondent
"WHY I WAS EXPELLED FROM
THE SOVIET UNION"
NOV. 1-RAYMOND GRAM SWING
Distinguished News Analyst and Radio Per-
sonality.

FEB. 24-CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER
A "first lady" of the theatre. Entertainment
at its best.
Solo-Drama: "THE WIVES OF HENRY VIII"
MARCH 3-EVE CURIE
Eminent French author and journalist.
"FRANCE-STRUGGLE FOR CIVILIZATION"
MARCH 10-HERBERT' AGAR

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