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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1948 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ENERGY, AGILITY REQUIRED:

Disc Jockey Show Keeps MacDonald in

renzy ,

"V

.

By JOHN DAVIES
Disc Jockey Ken MacDonald
finds that managing his two-
hour, six-night-a-week program
takes more energy and agility than
running the Marathon in the
mud.
He is kept in a frenzy announc-
ing the numbers, reading com-
mercials, answering and writing
down telephone requests, curing
up the records, racing down a
long hall to get them from the
disc library and keeping a watch-
ful eye on the volume meter.
* * *
KEN'S THRONE is a swivel
chair which faces a complex mass
of meters and dials and is flanked
by two large turntables. Three
telephone lines are also trunked

into the control
him.

panel in front of1

MacDonald thinks riding the
records is an over-glamorized,
underpaid profession but he en-
joys his work because of the in-
teresting contacts he makes. lie
has a regular clientele of record
requesters, and prides himself
on recognizing their voices al-
though he admits he wouldn't
know therm by sight.
Many of MacDonald's unseen
friends have been made in the
West Quadrangle which relays the
FM program over local wired-rad-
io stations.
THE WIREY announcer, who
looks a little like Spike Jones,
thinks his show is almost as near

ta

a town get-together as a record
request show. Many listeners call
up and ask for requests in the
name of their guests to impress
them as well as because they want
to hear the number, he says.
Ken will tell you that most of
his-listeners are normal, courte-
ous citizens, but he has had his
share of scrapes with eccen-
ties.
One was a rural woman who
seemed to be losing calves from
her farm. She demanded either a
classified ad or space on a news-
program to advertise a reward for
the animal which she said had
been stolen twice in the past six
months-in a jeep.
* * *
CERTAIN TEEN-AGED baby
sitters are so fond of Ken's show
that they have found a way to
listen to him even when working
in home that don't have FM re-
ceivers.
They phone in their requests
to Ken and then wait for a
friend who has an FM receiver
to call them up and hold the3
telephone earpiece next to the
amplifier so they can hear their
request.
Once MacDonald inadvertantly
spoiled a surprise a listener plan-
ned for his guests. The listener
sneaked out of his living room to
phone in a request for the guests
who were listening to the program
at the time.
AS FATE would have it, the
MacDonald was between numbers
when the listener's call registered
on the board before him and his
microphone was open. The result
was that the guests in the living
room heard the request in their
name and gave him the horse
laugh when he came back into the
room.
Occasionally people give the
Doolittle Survivor
Returns to Japan
SALEM, Ore.--(T)--A survivor
of the Doolittle raid is en route
back to Japan to become a mis-
sionary to that country.
Jacob Deshazer, 35, bombardier
in the famed Doolittle raid of
April, 1942 will sail from San
Francisco next Tuesday with his
wife and year-old son. They will
be missionaries of the Free Meth-
odist Church in Japan.
Deshazer came soack from 34
months in solitary confinement at
a Japanese prison camp determ-
ined to "do something to help
those people." As soon as the
war's end liberated him, he began
studying for the ministry.

acif ic Isles
Gain Fame
During
BATAVIA, Java-P)-The most
backward and destitute islands in
the Pacific today are the ones that
gained the greatest wartime fame
-the Solomons.
This was the report of Capt. Ir-
ving Johnson, American skipper
of the Yacht "Yankee II," after he
had finished the' most complete
survey of Pacific islands that has
been made since the war.
THE SPRINGFIELD, Mass.,
author and yachtsman arrived in
the East Indies after sailing for
almost a year through the Pacific
and making 85 stops, most of
them at remote islands.
"Shipping in the British and
Australian Solomons is almost
at a standstill," Johnson said.
"Copra is not getting out and
the coconut plantations are de-
teriorating rapidly. Many na-
tives are going hungry."
There are few reminders that
the South Pacific was one of the
world's great battlefields, or that
places like Tulagi, Bougainville,
"Iron Bottom Bay," "The Slot"
and Savo Island fill monumental
places in the history of World
War IT.
"AT GUAIALCANAL the piers
and warehouses built during the
war are rotting and falling apart,"
t'; said. "Nothing will be left of
them in another year.
"Sailing through the Solo-
nions we spotted a few hulks of
Japanese and American land-
ing craft on the beaches, but
that was about all."
Jungles have crept over most
of the airfields, although some
sections of Henderson Field on
Guadalcanal remain cleared.
r.
THE SITES of a few former
military bases are marked by the
rusted remains of trucks and war
machinery stretched out for miles
in neat rows. Firearms and am-
munition, still usable in water-
proof packing, were found by
Johnson's party on one isolated
atoll.
The "Yanks" have a place
in native legends, but even
those are becoming vague. To-
day even the bodies of Ameri-
can servicemen have been re-
moved from South Pacific cem-
eteries.
The "Yankee II," a 96-foot Bri-
gantine with auxiliary engines,
sailed with a crew of 21 from
Gloucester, Mass., in November
1947. Johnson, on his fourth
world cruise in a sailing craft,ex-
pects to circle the globe and. be
back in his home port in June
next year. He left the East Indies
en route to Africa.

Christmas shoppers looking for
something novel in the way of
ifts may find the very thing they
want in the annual display of
Chinese items at International
Center.
IC headcluariteis Porehases the
merchandise from the United Ser-
vice to China. Part of the profits
received from the sale are return-
ed to the USC and part is donated
to the Emergency Fund for For-
eign Students. Last year $300 was
turned over to the Fund.
ROBERT K INGER, assistant
counselor to Foreign students
pointed out that the Center is one
of the largest buyers for USC

Display of Novel Chinese Gifts
eAd to Yule Shoppers

i-S NIGHT
S ggeszons galore -
For the gal you adore!

merchandise, investing $1,000 each
year.
Some of the items on sale are
Chinese Christmas cards, play-
ing cards, stationery, Chinese
tea and a recipe book of auth-
entic cantonese dishes.
The various flavors of Chinesj
tea are being sampled at the week-
ly Thursday teas at the Center.
DELICATE reproductions o i
Chinese paintings are embossed on
the Christmas cards and gifi
wrapping paper.
Articles will be sold at the Cen-
ter from 8:30 a.m.-noon and I
p.rn.-5 p.m.

Q BATH TOWEL SETS
Q TEA TOWELS
QIBATH MAT SET
Q TABLE CLOTHS
QiBLANKETS
QICOLORED SHEET SETS
Q HANDKERCHIEFS
QlEMBROIDERED
PILLOW CASES
QlCOCKTAIL NAPKINS
LITEA NAPKINS
Q SILK SCARFS
QIPLACE MAT SETS
QITHROW RUGS
p GUEST TOWELS
L SHOWER AND WINDOW
CURTAIN SETS
GAGE LINEN SHOP

DISC JOCKEY-Ken MacDonald finds that running a two-hour
record request program six nights a week keeps him busy answer-
ing the three telephone lines that trunk into the control panel.
When off the phone, he amuses hiiselif by dashing down the hall
to get the records, keeping a wat-hfiul eye on the volume dial,
writing down the requests that are phoned in and reading coi-
mercials.
* * * -is
busy announcer a little trouble, ;work for the day. A show featur-
but not often. One listener call- ing new records and a quizz pro-
ed up and made a request for- grain are among the other labors
less talking. of MacDonald's day, besides mis-
The disc-jockey program isn't cellaneous assignments, ,such as
by any means Ken's only radio station breaks.
Officals Say Total Presidential
Vote Second Hioheston Record

/
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ac~

Come in to' see our -
French imported
Perfumes and Colognes
$3.50 up
Gorgeous lacy Lingerie
$4.50 up
Jewelry and Compacts
$1.25 up

Sweaters and

Blouses
$4.50 up

Also a wide
selection of
BAGS, GLOVES, HOSE,
SCARVES, and
B I LLFOLDS.

WASHINGTON-(AP)-The total
vote for President on Nov. 2, with
all figures official except Connect-
icut's, was 48,680,009, second high-
est on record.
But the total number of ballot:
cast was 49.363,391 or 683382
higher than the presidential total.
This is explained by the fact that
16 states showed higher votes for
state and local candidates than
for the office of president.j
* *
THIS WAS one of the many
striking features of the 1948 elec-
tion which President Truman won

with an electoral vote of 304 in 28
states against 189 for Gov. Thom-
as E. Dewey in 16, and 38 for Gov.
J. Strom Thurmond, States Rights
candidate, in four.
'l ae Vr sidexit polled a total
lof 24.11,04.8; Dewey 21,969,-
625; Thurmond 1,169,312; Henry
A. Wallace, Progressive, 1,156,-
856: Norman Thomas, Socialist,
1:3i,0:8; Clatde A. Watson, Pro-
hibitioti, 10.3,343: Edward A.
Teichert, Socialist-Labor 27,921;
Farrell Dobbs, Socialist Work-
ers, 13,007, and the rest scatter-
ed.

A1I purchases gaily gift-wrapped
free of charge.

11 Nickels Arcade

302 SOUTH STATE

Phone 4727

S.anta o e ing u3 out now
We've persuaded ol' Kris Kringle to give us a helping hand A cf
for the next couple of weeks. And he brought his whole +, 7
sed-load of Christmas gifts with him-cosmetics, " toysrt
camera supplies, sinoking needs, candies. Come in today
and let Kris help you select your Christmas gifts atCak n -lth rs
"ass
RARITY

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