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September 16, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THU SDAY, SEPTE-MER 16, 1948

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Nine r
ieCrisler Tops
ist as Dixon
Also Resigns
By HERB RUSKIN
While the past athletic season
was a success for Michigan from
the victory angle, it was far from
that in the matter of keeping the
Wolverine coaching staff.
Four of Michigan's nine varsity
coaches quit their posts and five
assistants followed along the gen-
eral trend by moving to other
schools.
Criser Quits
The big surprise came early last
spring when Herbert O. "Fritz"
Crisler, the man who had begn
head football coach for ten years
and who led the Wolverine grid-
ders to one of their greatest sea-
sons in 1947, stepped down from
his grid post to devote all his tim
to the business of Athletic Direc-
tor. At the same time it was an-
nounced that Bennie Oosterbaan,
Michigan grid great and last
year's backfield coach would be
named to succeed Crisler.
Crisler's resignation was a se-
vere shock to Michigan's many
grid followers, but this was large
ly dispelled by the appointment
of the very capable Oosterbaan.
Quite a few persons believed
that Crisler's resignation from his
coaching job was just the first
step in a complete break with the
University. It was rumored that
he would go into private business
to accept a post carrying with it
a salary of $50,000.
RIDE AWAY..
I, f

olvermne

Coaches Leave

Posts

LES REMINISCES:
Michigan Athletics Publicist
Recalls Top Thrill of Career

head basketball coach, Ozzie
Cowles, the man who lead Michi-
gan out of the basketball wilder-
ness accepted a similar position at
Minnesota at a salary estimated to
be around $10,000 a year.
In leaving, Cowles said that he
hated to leave Michigan, but that
he had always wanted to coach at
Minnesota and that he had many
friends up there. Accompanying
Cowles was his freshman coac'1,
Joe Vancisin.
After Long Wait
Coming to Michigan two years
ago from Dartmouth, Cowles lei
the Wolverines their first basket-
ball title in 20 years last season.
In his first year, mainly one of
preparation for the future, the
Wolverines finished fifth with a
.500 record.
Ernie McCoy, a star on the 1927
championship team and current
assistant Athletic Director, was
appointed to succeed Cowles. Dur-
ing the past two years, McCoy
served as assistant cage mentor
under Cowles, while Dave Strack
who starred for Michigan court
squads in the early 1940's was
named frosh coach.
The lure of the University of
Pennsylvania proved to be too
strong to hold track coach Ken
Doherty to his Michigan job. 4
100% raise in salary plus a post
in Penn's up and coming phys ed
department were the bait used to
get Doherty to shift schools.
Trained Fonville
It was Doherty's training of
shot-putter Charlie Fonville that
was responsible in no small meas-
ure for Fonville's breaking tm

MINNESOTA BOUND - Cage
Coach Ozzie Cowles, who just
couldn't resist the call of the
Minnesota wilds and took over
as- Gopher hoop mentor.
These rumors were scotehed by
Crisler in mid-spring when he an-
nounced that his "roots were tot
deep" and that he would remain
with the University.
More Rumors
"Rumorsitis" continued to rio
the campus during the spring,
when stories made the rounds con-
cerning cage coach Ozzie Cowles
and track mentor Ken Doherty.
These stories had a stronger foun-
dation than did those concerning
Crisler and. both proved to be true.
After two years at his post of

HARVARD CALLS-One of the
first to announce his moving was
Wolverine end coach Art Val-
pey, who was named head coach
of next year's edition of the
Harvard football squad. Despite
his youth, Valpey is regarded
one of the most promising of to-
day's coaches. In moving, Val-
pey took Butch Jordan along to
be his line coach, and named
former end Elmer Madar to the
end coach's job.
world shot mark during the out-
door season with a heave of 58
feet % inch.
Freshman and assistant coach
Don Canham, labeled by many as
potentially one of the finest
coaches in the Conference, was
elevated to fill Doherty's post.
Dixon Steps Down
Michigan's fourth loss from the

coaching ranks was Bob Dixon,
who resigned from his tennis post
at the end of the spring semester.
Dixon, who had coached two years
without pay to preserve his ama-
teur tennis standing, quit to ac-
cept a teaching post at the Uni-
versity of Illinois.
Michigan netters moved to the
fore during his two year stay, tak-
ing third in the Conference in
1947 and advancing to second this
past season.
Assistants Leave
Besides the loss of Crisler, the
football coaching ranks were fur-
ther depleted by the resignation of
four assistant coaches. The first
of these to go was Art Valpey, who
resigned at the end of the football
season to take over the head
coaching job "at Harvard., Going
along with him was Forrest
"Butch" Jordan, assistant line
coach, who was appointed fine
coach at Harvard.
The third to go was George
Allen, who was assistant 150-
pound coach. He was named head
football coach at small Morning-
side college. The last to leave was
Gib Holgate, assistant JV mento-,
who was picked to succeed Davey
Nelson as football coach at Hills-
dale College.
Filling these posts was no easy
matter for Crisler, but by the end
of the year, most of the spots had
their new men in them. George
Ceithaml was moved up from JV
coach to succeed Oosterbaan as
backfield director, while newcomer
Bill Orwig was picked to take over
Valpey's end coach job.
Players ITurn
Commentato-r
There never was a more power-
ful box-office attiaction around
Ann Arbor than the technicolor
movies of the Michigan-Southern
Cal struggle in the Rose Bowl.
Students and local residents
flocked to Hill Auditorium to hear
the play-by-play description right
from the men who were respon-
sible for the dramatic scenes. Bob
Chappuis, Bump Elliott, Howard
Yerges, and Dick Rifenburg.

In describing his most thrilling}
experience of more than 20 years
of newswriting, Lces Etter, head
of the publicity department of the
University athletic association,
relates the incident which won the
second of a two-game series be-
tween Michigan and Minnesota
during the 1926 season.
"It was late in that game,"
Etter begins, "that the great All-
American, Bennie Ooosterbaan
whom I have come to know quite
intimately as a Michigan coach in
the last two years picked up a
free ball inside the Michigan 40-
yard line and romped 60-odd
yards for the score that tied the
ball game."
Biggest Thrill
That play, coupled with the
conversion for goal by the other
member of the Bennie-to-Benny

combination, Benny Friedman,
was the most thrill-packed of his
life, Etter related. "I was a fresh-
man at Minnesota at the time and
was full of the old college spirit.
It was a serious blow to my morale,
for with that play, Michigan won
the game 7-6," he added.
Ends Fifth Year Here
Etter, who has seen quite a few
thrilling sights during his career
as news reporter and publicity
man, is now entering his fifth
year at the University, having
marked his fourth anniversary
here Aug. d
As head of the department,
Etter's responsibilities - are nu-
merous. He sends all Michigan
sports news to more than 600
newspaper. and radio stations
throughout the country.

URaED BY IPENN -After eight
years leading Michigan track
squads, Ken Doherty resigned to
accept a similar position at
Pennsylvania.
Doherty is succeeded by Don
Canham, Michigan high-jumper
from '39-'40.

4

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Iii ________ ______ __ .--- . -- -- - -- - _ _________1_______

dill

'OUR ,COLLEGE BOOCKS'TORE"
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BEST ON CAMPUS:
Setoier Wins Daily I-M Trophy

HERDQUI4RTERS for
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Mac's Auto Mort

By BEV BUSSEY
In a big school where it's easy
for the average student to be swal-
lowed up in mediocrity, there is
still a chance here at Michigan
to gain some recognition for ath-
letic prowess.
A few extra-curricular hours
down at the Intramural Building
has proved that to Lee Setomer,
winner of last year's annual trophy
as "I-M Athlete of the Year."
Upon the reeomrnendaton of
Earl Riskey, diretor of the Intra-
mural program, a cup, awarded
by the Michigan Daily, is given
1,000 HEADS WANTED
For that Collegiate "Crew or
Personality Cut" at the Das-
cola Barbers, between State
and Michigan Theatres.

to the individual with the highest
number of points earned in various
activities throughout the two se-
mesters.
Any sports enthusiast has an
equal opportunity to become the
athlete of renown-whether he be
a fraternity, dorm or independent
agent.
Setomer, the '47-'48 winner, was
an independent who devoted most
of his spare time to instructing
and arranging the annual boxing
show held during the I-M Open
House. He entered every All-Cam-
pus tournament and was noted for
his powerful hand-ball tactics,
The trophy was awarded the
previous year to Don Murray, en-
ergetic and house-conscious ath-
lete from Greene House. Don was
listed in thirteen sports, most of
them as a team member for
Greene House, and in each con-'

test, he was some place near the
top of the standings.
Murray won the cup after a
lapse of four years when the war-
time program interrupted regular
activities. As' seen in these two
cases, versatility and ability sound
the keynote. More points are made
with each advancement in any
tournament, whether it be singles
or team competition.
There are thirty-six sports on
the yearly program, and out of
this number, fourteen is consid-
ered the average needed for all
hopefuls.
In the case of varsity miei, they
are pot allowed to engage in I-M
tournaments while the sports in
which they are participating are
still in session. Although that sport
may terminate in the middle of an
I-M tourney, the letter winner
must wait until the beginning of
the next contest scheduled.

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Phone 2-0814

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