100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 1948 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TEMRSDAY, SEET'EAMER 16, 1948

THAll.:~DAr

THRDA.SETMBR1& ®4

OLD CRICKET FIELD:
Ferry Field Scene
Of Many Triumphs

McCOY DIRECTS:
Manager's Club Rolls into High Gear

Of the various facilities incor-
porated in the University athletic
plant, which started as a single
gymnasium tent in 1858, none has
a more colorful or complicated his-
tory than Ferry Field.
Since the first makeshift struc-
ture, the athletic set-up has un-
dergone many changes, moving
from the original site, where the
Physics laboratory now stands,
to the South State stronghold it
occupies at present. Included in
the current group of buildings is
the mammoth stadium, the Sports
Building, Yost Field House, the
Coliseum and the Administration
Building. Waterman and Barbour
Gyms, of course, accomodate both
men's and women's physical edu-
cation classes.
Of the outdoor fields, besides
the Stadium, the plant includes
the Ferry Field track, the baseball
diamond, the University golf
course, tennis courts both on Fer-
ry and Palmer fields.
Purchased in 1891
Ferry Field itself was purchased
by the Board of Regents for $3,-
000 in 1891, when it was realized
that the play field near the camp-
us gymnasium and the fair
grounds in the south eastern part
of Ann Arbor were becoming in-
adequate. First recognition of the
need for outdor facilities came in
1865, when the Board appropriated
$150 in two years for the care of a
cricket field.
But Michigan was destined for
bigger things than cricket. The
original purchase included the
south ten acres of the present
Field, which had to be graded and
drained before a quarter mile
track surrounding a baseball dia-
mond and gridiron could be laid
out.

name was changed to the present
title in 1902, when the Hon. D.
M. Ferry of Detroit donated 21
additional acres north of the or-
iginal ten. Two years later, a brick
was constructed around three sides
of the field and later gifts of Ferry
made possible the building of
gates and ticket offices.
In 1893, stands with a seating
capacity of 400-a drop in the
bucket now--were built for foot-
ball spectators, but two years lat-
er were destroyed by fire and con-
sequently rebuilt, this time accom-
odating double the old amount. A
ground keeper's house was also
raised at that time, showing that
Michigan was right in step with
"progress."
First Gridders Played There
When the final football game on
the old site was played in 1906, *ie
stands had been expanded to the
point where they could seat the
17,000 people who were part of a
record crowd that day.
The heyday of Ferry Field as
the site of all important athletic
spectacles was not ended until 1927
when the present Stadium was
built and football games were
shifted there from their old home.
Gridiron Moved
In 1906, the gridiron was moved
to the northern part of the area,
surrounded by the present quar-
ter-mile cinder track. Wooden
stands accomodated spectators un-
til 1914, when the concrete stands
were constructed.
Although this south unit seat-
ing 46,000 was the only one built,
plans eventually called for a U-
shaped structure to surround three
sides of the track. Meanwhile. the
wooden stands were moved to the
new baseball diamond in 1912,
which lay on the site now occupied
by Yost Field House.

Now moving into the third year
since its post-war revival by bas-
ketall coach and assistant Ath-
letic Director Ernie McCoy, the
athletic manager system is rolling
along is high gear.
Abandoned at the start of the
war because of the manpower
shortage at school, with peace-
time conditions again prevailing
on campus, the manager system
has made great strides since its
re-activation in the spring of 1946.
Altogether there are nine
managerships, four competitive
in football, basketball, baseball
and track and five non-compet-
itive in wrestling, tennis, golf,
hockey and intramurals. Each
of the competitive sports has a
senior manager, not more than
four junior managers and a
maximum of eight sophomore
managers.

The four competitive managers
are selected by a vote of the out-
going senior manager, the captain
of the sport involved and the
coach. The five non-competitive
managers are selected from the
remaining junior managers not
chosen as senior managers in the
sport in which they were working.
The senior manager receives
four free tickets to all home games
of the sport for which he is man-
ager, the privilege of meals at the
training table where they are pro-
vided for members of the team on
which he is the manager and is
awarded a manager's outline "M"
and hat.
In addition the managers of
the four sports football, basket-
ball, baseball and track are per-
mitted to accompany their res-
pective teams on all out of town
trips, while the non-competi-

tive managers have the privilege
of selecting one trip a year that
they would like to take.
The junior managers for each
sport are selected from the sopho-
more tryouts. As sophomores they
are assigned days of duty and
coached in their jobs by the sen-
ior managers. From these sopho-
mores comes the eventual senior
manager.
The junior manager supervises
the work of the new tryouts and
at the end of the season selects,
with the aid of the senior mana-
ger, the junior managers for the
next season.
Jenior managers for each
sport receives a pair of tickets
for each home event of the sport
for which they are manager, the
managers heavyweight sweater
award and pre-season training
See MANAGERS, Page 8

FERRY FIELD-Began as a cricket field and now houses most of the Wolverine athletic facilities.
Natators Cop Wolverine Golfers Drop Down

II

Called "Regents

Field," the

Two Crowns
In TopYear
Laurels and more laurels came
to Michigan swimmers this year,
as the Wolverines enjoyed their
best season in many years.
Team balance, rather than a
predominance in any one event,
was the password to their first Big
Nine title in three years and their
first NCAA crown in seven years.
Not Prominent
It would be unfair to say that
the Wolverines did not have indi-
vidual stars in their ranks, but
they were not as prominent as
they had been in past years.
The Michigan mermen smashed
their way through an undefeated
dual meet season, their greatest
triumph coming in Columbus when
they dunked a powerful Ohio State
aggregation 46-38, the fate of the
meet resting on the last event, the
400-yard freestyle relay, which the
Wolverines won to take the meet.
Big Nine Crown
Their first display of balance
came in the Big Nine Meet in Iowa
City, where, winning only three
first places, they edged out Ohio
State's divers to win the meet by
three points. Harry Holiday tri-
umphed in the 150-yard back-
stroke, Matt Mann III won the
1500-meter freestyle and the 300-
See SWIMMING, Page 5
1,000 HEADS WANTED
For that Collegiate "Crew or
Personality Cut" at the Das-
cola Barbers, between State
and Michigan Theatres.

;SfiF .b' isi .:.....r'r::tisLP: r'r'.{:ti?:":fvtti .{E41 i' fsisM

To Fourth Slot in BigNine Meet

EMEM@mmemis

IM 01MIM-111WI ".0k: M.

&

One of the most coveted trophies
in the sports world is the Little
Brown Jug, awarded annually
when Michigan and Minnesota
meet on the football field to de-
cide which school is to keep the
trophy for the following year.
The Jug itself has an interest-
ing, somewhat humorous origin.
Back in 1903, Fielding H. Yost,
Michigan's famous coach, brought
one of his great "point a minute"
teams to Minneapolis for the year-
ly game with the Gophers. The
Wolverines were heavy favorites
and Minnesota seemed doomed to
defeat.
Game Ends In Tie
Minnesota, however, had forgot-
ten to read the odds in the morn-
ing p.apers. The Gophers hung on.
tenaciously and the game endedj
in a 6-6 tie.
As a reward for the moral vic-
tory, the Golden Gophers wanted
some sort of a trophy. Oscar Mun-
son, Minnesota's equipment man-
ager, remembered seeing a brown
stone water jug which the Michi-,
gan team had brought with it. He
took the jug, and the Wolverines
didn't miss it when they left.
"Come and Get It"
When the team got back to Ann
Arbor, one of the players remem-
bered seeing Munson taking the
jug. He told Yost about it and a
letter was promptly dispatched
asking for its return. The Gophers
reply was a simple challenge to
"come and get it."
Michigan accepted the chal-
leng 3. However, they didn't play
the Gophers again until six yc Is

later, but that year, they trounced
Minnesota to the tune of 15-6: Af-
ter that, Michigan reigned su-
preme for a period of 24 years. In
the sixteen Minnesota games
played between 1909 and 1933, the
Wolverines won 13, lost two and
tied one.
Michigan Tops Record
In 1934, however, Minnesota
took over and proceeded to es-
tablish a monopoly of its own.
The Gophers won nine consecu-
tive games until Michigan beat a
Bierman-less team by a 49-6 count
in 1943. The Wolverine squad took
the Jug in the four contests since
that year, winning last season's
game and the trophy by a 13-6
margin.
Since the beginning of compe-
tition for the Little Brown Jug in
1903. Michigan has won 18 con-
tests, lost 11 and two games have
wound up in ties.
The jayvee golfers had a suc-
cessiul season with five wins and
three defeats under the direction
of Coach Bill Ludolph.

I

I

BEER
DEPOT

I

I'l

BEER MIXERS WINE
CHAMPAGNE & SNACKS
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE

Daily: 10A.M.-10 P.M.

Sunday: Noon-7 P.M.

NO PARKING PROBLEMS
114 East Williams

Call 7191

I-

MI CHIGAN

:.
. .} .
;, . ;.;,.... .s: .
' A <:..
...1

GOES

NEW
STYLES
FIRST
AT
WILD'S

+- -
~ie Afr ihan Baiig
ENTERS ITS FIFTY-NINTH YEAR
OF CONTIUOUS PUBLICATION
CAMPUS NEWS AND FEATURE STORIES
ASSOCIATED PRESS WORLD NEWS COVERAGE
THE UNIVERSITY'S DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
SYNDICATED COLUMNISTS
SPORTS NEWS ... SOCIAL CALENDAR. OBARNABY

WILD*9..

Again this year, as for the past 60 years, Michigan
students are going to Wild's for the finest in correct
campus attire. This year we are proud to welcome
you to a brand new Wild shop. As some of you re-
member, we had a fire last December which des-
troyed everything-except our knowledge and ex-
perience outfitting Michigan men. Our new shop is
stocked with the newest merchandise from the na-

y'
s{
n{:..

tion's leading makers.

Come in .. . we'll be glad to

see you!
Schloss, Goodall and Varsity-town clothes
. . . Interwoven and Tricamp socks . . .
Knox hats . . . Bates and Stacy-Adats
shoes . . . Lord Jeff sweaters . . . Damon
and McCiurrach neckwear . . . Alligator
rainwear . . Swank and Hickok accessor-
ies . . . Arrow shirts . . . ties . . . underwear
.. .Weldon pajamas

Even if "The Peon's Plight" NEVER
opens, I won't do that scene again!
Okay, Joy. Go back
to the hotel. See
you in the morning.
-8-3

Goodnight.

T

(C
9l

"Goodnight!" Ophelia's
exit in Act IV, Scene V-
The mad
scene-
0
4

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:

$5.00 . .a. the School Year

$3.00 ... the Semester

I I

( '

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan