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November 28, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SHE ICi Ii lAN WDLt

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
'Old King Football' Goes Out in Style

The gridiron season apparently
went out this fall on an artistic
note as scholars on American cam-
puses took brush in hand and
vented their emotions on digni-
fied statues, crusty edifices and
other bric-a-brac.
Tommy Trojan, monument on
the University of Southern Cali-
fornia was the worst victim. UCLA
students plastered him with gal-
lons of high-grade paint and then
daubed the, sticky surface with
feathers, according to the Daily
Trojan.
* * *
THE GREAT RIVALRY be-
tweeen the two schools swayed and
almost cracked as USC officials
listed the cost of scraping 'Tommy'
and assorted campus buildings the
vandals had used the remainder of
their paint on at more than $1,-
000.
The Daily Trojan and Daily
Bruin, at UCLA, joined forces to
clean up the rivalry and at last
word the two institutions are on
the verge of a non-aggression act.
EVEN THE SEDATE 'environs'
of Harvard were splashed with
Brown paint when scholars of that
school decided it was time for a
drastic change on the oldest cam-
pus in the United States.
The Brown College students-+
caught Brown -handed - were
promptly made to kick the ac-1
111

ademic bucket and dip into their
pockets for more than $200 to
pay for paint-remover, according
to the Harvard Crimson.
* * *
STUDENTS of Utah University
woke one morning to find that the
block "U" that adorns the hill to
the northeast of their campus was
whitewashed over during the night
with a "W".
Utah redskins considered scalp-
ing anyone from Wyoming who
might be hanging around with a
loose parting, according to the
Utah Chronicle.
*. * *
MOST SUPREME outburst of
collegiate nonsense came before
two hard-luck ball clubs, the Pur-
due Boilermakers and the Hoosiers
of Indiana kicked off for the tra-
ditional Old Oaken Bucket.
The Hoosiers planned the fu-
neral of "Old Jawn Purdue" in
grand style and the metalsmiths
elaborately prepared for the
cremation of "Miss Indiana."
As things approached the
gurgling point, one of the two
student publications printed this
cryptic headline: "I.U. VS. P.U.
FOR BUCKET."
Indiana students climaxed the
rivalry by dropping leaflets on the
Purdue campus. "What the Hell
can you expect-with a kid prexy
from deah old Oxford, with a
bunch of hick students with no
I1

spirit, with an inexperienced high
school coaching staff, with eleven
old men . . . flops of the year?
I.U. 40, Cow College 0.
Incidentally, Purdue took the
hide off 'deah old' Indiana, 39-0.
* * *
WHILE WE ARE whetting our
throats with the final meaty dregs
of football, savor this one:
According to the Ohio State
Lantern, at Ohio State Univer-
sity (south of Toledo) the Buck-
eyes are better than Michigan
by 438 points-according to
comparative scores.
Unfortunately the Buckeyes
were not able to keep up with
tle hot sliderules of the Lantern
sportsters and played 448 point-
under-par ball. We knew it all the
time.
FROM A RECENT University of
Pennsylvania Daily Pennsylvan-
ian:
Not so witty
Not so funny
Merely mild
And continued sunny.
... weather report, no less.
THE SILVER AND GOLD, at
the University of Colorado re-
cently hit the streets in yellow
paper.
Several unfortunate events on
the Colorado campus during the
past few months, which The
Daily does not consider "news"
and the natural urge to accuse
have led S. and G. to deny
"yellow journalism."

Bell, Union To
Meet To Parley
Strike Issues
Sigler's Panel Gives
Recommendations
DETROIT-(P)-The Michigan
Bell Telephone Co. and Union rep-
resentatives of its operators and
accounting employes have agreed
to make another attempt to settle
their long dispute.
The two parties will meet Mon-
day or Tuesday to discuss recom-
mendations that Governor Sigler's
fact-finding panel handed down
yesterday after a study of the
issues.
* * * '
PROF. RUSSEL A. SMITH, of
the University Law School, is a
member of the panel, which in-
cludes Dr. David D. Henry, Presi-
dent of Wayne University and Rev.
A. H. Poetker of the University
of Detroit.
The Board recommended a 10-
cent hourly wage hike for 18,-
000 workers, as well as a dues
checkoff, reinstatement of 22
workers disciplined for their part
in a series of "quickie" strikes,
and a no-strike pledge on the
part of the union.
Michigan Bell said the pay in-
crease recommended by the panel
would cost an additional $7,000,-
000 a year in operating expenses
and might mean a further boost
in telephone rates.

TALENTED RUSSIAN:
Choral Union Series To Bring
RudolfSerkin, Noted Pianist

Rudolf Serkin, known as one of
the top-ranking pianists of the
day, will perform here at 8:30 p.m.
Friday in Hill Auditorium.
No newcomer to Ann Arbor, Ser-
kin has performed here three
times previously, once in recital
and twice in the May Festival
programs as piano soloist with the
Philadelphia Symphony.
* * *
BORN IN BOHEMIA of Russian
parents, Serkin displayed his mu-
sical talents at an early age. At
four he played the piano well and
could read music with facility.
Wise parents however, the
Serkins determined that their
son's talents should not be ex-
ploited. Not until a good many
years later, after a period of
hard training, did Serkin set
forth on his first concert tour.

After gaining international fame
through his tours of Europe and
recitals with his well-known fa-
ther-in-law, the violinist Adolph
Busch, Serkin first played in this
country at the Coolidge Festival in
Washington.
HIS DEBUT as solo pianist did
not come until Toscanini chose
him as soloist in 1936 with the
New York Philharmonic - Sym-
phony.
Serkin received an ovation
such as had seldom been wit-
nessed at Carnegie Hall and has
since duplicated his original tri-
umph in practically every Amer-
ican city.
Tickets for his performance
here may be obtained at the Uni-
versity Musical Society's offices,
Burton Tower.

BERLIN'S LADY DOGCATCHER--Berta Feder, first post-war
dogcatcher in the German capital, demonstrated her original,
weapon in luring the city's dogs, which are increasing in number-
a lasso. Not alarmed, the curious spaniel takes the rope in his
mouth.
TEACHING DILEMMA:
Emotional School Child Finds
StudyDifficult Says Educator

Eat at
THEWHITE S POT
BREAKFAST - LUNCH -- DINNER - SNACKS
OPEN CONTINUOUSLY
Sunday 5:00 P.M. to Saturday 2:30 P.M.
Sunday Breakfast 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M.
THE WHITE SPOT... 517 E. William
When downtown stop at the White Spot - 328 South Main

AGAIN AVAILABLE
The 1949
,MICHIGAN CALENDAR
containing a beautiful colored cover
and twelve scenic views of the campus.
Only $1.5io

"Merely
age," they

a sudden paper short-
said the morning after.
* * *

THE UCLA campus was recent-
ly adorned with brand new, shin-
ing, swing-top trash cans.
They were too beautiful for
words, according to the Daily
Bruin. In fact they were too
good for mere trash for some
scholars.
Maintenance men are now sort-
ing the trash from letters stu-
dents are mailing in the new
cans. . .
Late Charges
TIJUANA, Mexico-More than
47 per cent c' the total electrical
generating capacity in the United
States is concentrated in the heav-
ily industrialized Middle Atlantic
and East North Central states.

CHICAGO - (,P) - A Detroit
educator said today that an emo-
tionally upset child can not learn
successfully.
He called on social studies
teachers to help children to ad-
just emotionally to the conditions
of present day life.
Electricity Cut
In Soviet Zone
OfGermany
BERLIN--(P)--Use of electricity
in the Soviet occupation zone of
Germany was ordered cut sharply
today, reflecting the pinch of the
Allied counter-blockade of the
zone.
The curtailments affect indus-j
trial, commercial and domestic
users. The order was announced1
by the Soviet-licensed ADN news
agency.
Power for homes will be cut offI
five hours daily and use of edec-I
tricity for cooking was forbidden
where any other means are avail-
able. Power to stores and offices,
are to be cut off nine hours each1
day. Among the industrial re-
strictions is a weekly "power sav-
ing day" in addition to Sunday.

The suggestion was made by
Stanley E. Dimond of the Detroit
Public Schools at a meeting of the
national council for social studies.
Dimond, council president, said:
"We are, I suspect the bloodiest
generation that has ever inhabited
this globe.
"For the youngest of parents
there is memory of the world's
greatest depression followed by
the world's greatest war.
For older parents there is mem-
ory of World War I, a boom and
bust, and then World War II.
What is it like to be a child
growing up in a world that is filled
with conflict and disunity? One
inevitable result is that people in
order to survive in such a culture
become coarser."
Literary History. .
Director of the Clements Li-
brary, Randolph G. Adams, has
discussed reports and chronicles
in a recently published "Literary
History of the United States," by
Macmillan Co.
The three-volume work offers
a complete critical, biographical
and historical record of American
literature and its makers, explor-
ing every facit of our literature,
from earlier days to the present,
according to the publishers.

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