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November 28, 1948 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Svc i .Y ' e. Bc 1948 3©

. . t._ . a . . . _ _ . _ . , . ,

:

IENTIFIC SAMPLING:
'U' Survey Polls Still Deemed Accurate

By ROMA LIPSKY
While public opinion polls in
eneral are under question, the
niversity's Survey Research Cen-
r has retained its wide reputa-
on for scientific sampling meth-
Is and accurate results.
The names of people to be
iestioned, sent to interviewers all
rer the country, have been se-
cted at random, but behind the
nal selection is a complicated and
xacting statistical process.
* * *g
BEFORE beginning any survey,

the Center's Sampling Section
must decide what primary areas to
sample. These usually include the
nation's twelve largest cities and
other representative areas.
Then, by random jabs at a
table of scrambled numbers,
these areas are broken down
into representative city, town
and country sections, and finally
into blocks and specific houses.
During each successive step, the
choice of where to interview. is
made completely by chance.

a

Aialio

NOW thru TUESDAY

ato aCs

200 Lau

THE TABLE of scrambled num-
bers used to make selections has
been specially compiled by a com-
petent statistician, so that each
number or set of numbers, and
ultimately each person, has ex-
actly the same chance of being
chosen.
When the final choice of per-
sons to be interviewed has been
made, the sample consists of
as accurate a cross section of
the United States as is scientifi-
cally possible.
The basic difference between
this method and the quota sam-
pling used by Gallup and Roper
is the method of selection.
* * *
"IN THE QUOTA system, the
interviewer picks the people to be
questioned so the element of hu-
man bias influences the survey,"
Roe Goodman, of the Sampling
Section of the Survey Research
Center said.
"Roper and Gallup are aware of
these errors, and they adjust their
figures accordingly," he added.
In the random method used at
the Research Center, however, no
adjustment of figures is made. The
results are compiled and pub-.
lished just as they are received
from the interviewers.
Is Your Soil Vanishing?
DRY GULCH, Arizona - Soil
conservation may determine the
fate of civilizations, officials here
predicted.
Rushing torrents of water grind-
ing away the land can result in
civilizations "disappearing." they
said.

Possible Price DI AP
Support Drop Ro
BringsProtest Tr(
BOSTO:
Long-Range Farm treatmen
Act Principal Target thing to
________dalism.
WASHINGTON - (/P) -"Grass Judge
roots" protests against possible geend t
lower government price supports ball brawl
on major crops in 1950 may lead in greate
the Truman administration to ask day.
the new Congress to change ex- He expi
isting farm programs. interview
Farmers' criticism is being di- cellent re
rected principally at price support It con
provisions of a long-range farm owdies
act passed by the Republican- or 24 h
controlled 80th Congress and wear dia
signed by President Truman. bottles, P
Those provisions would greatly
reduce pretent price supports on
cotton, wheat, corn and some other
crops.
Objections by farmers to the No M
new program are flowing into the
Agriculture Department. Concern
also has been expressed by some
members of Congress, particularly
from the cotton south.
Officials close to Secretary of
Agriculture Brannan said the Tru-
man Administration has an "open ,
mind" on farmer complaints, and
that it welcomes suggestions for
possible amendments to the new

TR PENALTY:
wdies Sentenced To Baby
at ment by Boston Judge

N - {/P)-A little baby
1t-diapers and all-is the
curb rowdyism and van-
John H. Connelly sug-
he .treatment might put
o Thanksgiving Day foot-
vls which were numerous
r Boston over the holi-
lained in a post-holiday
that his court had ex-
sults with the treatment.
sists of sentencing the
o live the lives of babies
ours during which they
pers, drink from nippled
and play in a baby-pen.

ELEVATOR MOVING SIDEWAYS-A 230-ton grain elevator
crosses an overpass on a North Dakota railway on its 65-mile trip
from Hamar, N.D. to Wimbledon, N.D.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

He said no one ever subjected to
the "cure" came back to his ju-
venile court.
The Boston juvenile court judge
told a Boston Globe reporter that
the offenders were placed in cus-
tody of their parents who co-op-
erated in imposing the treatment.
"I am very happy," Judge Con-
nelly said, "that not one of those
boys has been in any kind of
trouble in the year since.
"It cured them of what we ex-
plained to them was stupid, un-
thinking mischief that only babies
can be allowed to commit."
The boys were convicted of de-
stroying school property.

KVOVOANM

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STARTING TODAY
THRU TUESDAY
N'ei hfts S~m Mnf t 4 Dn~ mo+2n

A ;i717

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ain - Opp. Courthouse 'i, u. %c .14)ii4Lna . a
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with EE
JACK HOLT -- --W----
SUPERMAN No. 11 - LATEST PATHE NEWS

'I,

Dennis MORGA N Vica LINDFORS
VICTOR FRANCEN
BRUCE BENNETT

Coming
WED.!
Weekday Matinees

"CAPTAIN BOCOTT"
"THE WOMAN IN WHITE"
25c - Evening and Sunday 35c

i

Publication in The Daily Official.
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Satur-
days.)
SUNDAY, NOV. 28, 1948
VOL. LIX, No. 58
Notices
Aeronautical and Civil Engi-
neering Graduates: Mr. R. J. Hel-
berg, of Boeing Aircraft Company
(Seattle Division), and Mr. Ray-
mond Hoffman (Wichita Division)
will interview Aeronautical and
Civil Engineering Graduates in
Rm. 1079 E. Engineering Bldg.,
dec. 2. Civil engineers should sign
the schedule on the Aero. Engr.
bulletin board. Application blanks
n Rm. 1079 E.E.
Interviews will be held by Bell
Aircraft Corporation (Buffalo, N.
Y.) on Tues., Dec. 7, Rm. 2501 E.
Engineering Bldg. (Electrical En-
;ineering Department).
Interested in February Electri-
.al Engineering graduates. Princi-
pal requirements in Electronics
for advanced development work

on missile programs. Prefer ad-
vanced degrees or top quarter un-
dergraduates. Have openings for
Masters in Mathematics, Physics,
Aeronautics in Aerodynamic Mis-
sile Design and Helicopter Design.
Also wish to consider top quality
people in Mechanical Engineering
or Applied Mathematics for po-
sitions in Servomechanisms De-
velopment.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained in Rm. 2501 E. Engineering
(Continued on Page 4)
hunter Goes
Topsyturvy
MIO, Mich.-(AP)-State police at
the Mio post reported today that
deer hunter William Shaw, 30, of
Van Dyke, Mich., had been injured
with a rifle shot that pierced his
foot from top to sole.
Troopers said he told them he
had been hit by a stray bullet.
They asked how that was possible,
concerning the angle of the shot.
Shaw replied that he had been
standing on his head, the officers
said.

9

Where

Are

They
Going

ILASSIFIED ADVEI

law.
Physics Club
To Organize
Undergraduates interested in I
physics will organize a new club
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Rm. 1014,
Randall Lab. Prof. W. Wallace
McCormick, faculty advisor, will
speak.{ .
Membership is open to all un- ~~
dergraduate students who have
had elementary physics and who
are interested in this field.
The club has been given depart-
mental permission to see the re-
search projects going on in the
Physics department. They plan to
have group discussions and talks
throughout the year by members. A f
Prof. McCormick said the club 4
would give a chance for all un-
dergraduate students to discuss ;:
professional subjects of interest to
them.
RTISING
BUSINESS SERVICES .
MOTION PICTURE PHOTOGRAPHY
"A great asset to any organization." at the
1507 White St. Ph. 8975 )6B
"NEARLY NEW" QUALITY CLOTHING Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Coats, $9 - $25 Suits, $7 - $25
Dresses, $2 - $10 Skirts, $1 - $8 productionof
Also other miscellaneous apparel
Hildegarde Shoppe 109 E. Washington
)1B
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done of the Guard
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Ph. 2-9020. )3B December 7, 8, 9
BOUGHT AND SOLD - Men's used
clothing by Ben the Tailor at Sam's Pattengill Auditorium 8 :00 P.M.
Store, 122 E. Washington. )5B
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS GENERAL TICKET SALES
Standards - Portables
Sold - Rented - Repaired $14.20 and 90c Nov. 29 - Dec. 9
We also buy used typewriters
OFFICE EQUIPMENT SERVICE CO. U. Hall
1116 S. Univ., 2-9409 111 S. 4th, 2-1213
)2B

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THE UNION FORMAL

TRANSPORTATION
RIDE to N.Y.C. or. N.J. Xmas. Share
expenses. Helen, 8983. )2T
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Telegraph and Ann Arbor. Ph. 2-4581,
Ext. 6, Miss Wisusik. )1T
FOR SALE
APARTMENT-SIZE Whirl-Dry Washer,
$30. Call 2-6092 after 5 p.m. )67
RADIO AND TELEVISION REPAIRS-
Quick, competent service by experts.
Aero Radio, 335 S. Main, Ph. 4997. )4
FOR DOWNY CASHMERE SWEATERS
in pink, cherry, wine, aqua, powder
blue, grey, green or beige - shop at ,.
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP )1
WATCH FOR THE NEW "CHRISTMAS
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GET XMAS VALUES THROUGH
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All wool homespun tweed skirts
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Sizes 9-18 $8.95 )2
CANARIES, PARAKEETS, javarice birds,
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FOR SALE-1934 Pontiac Tudor. New
Tires, good motor, dependable trans-
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after 7 p.m. 1001 S. Forest, or Phone
2-6692 for Vic. )68
ANGORA SWEATERS
Short sleeve $5.95--Cardigan $8.95
Pink - blue - maize
RANDALL'S
306 South State Street
Vote for SL

PERSONfAL

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WANTED
SEWING and alterations and refitting.
Also maker of paper flowers. Miss
Livingston, 315 S. Division, 2nd floor
front. )2W
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Mido Wrist Watch, leather and
steel band. Ph. 2-6134. Reward )6L
LOST-Gold Bracelet at masquerade in
Union Nov. 19. Reward, call 2-5553,
Rm. 324. )5L
LOST-Ladies' Wristwatch. Elgin Deluxe
with gold band, Wednesday p.m., Nov.
23, between Michigan Theatre and
Jordan Hall. Reward. Call 2-4561,
Room 583, Jordan Hall. )4L
2\991 -0%2 f

FREE RADIO
Win a radio in the 1949 Michiganensian
Photo Contest. . . . Watch the Daily
for the rules. . . . Deadline December
15. )5P

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and Homer Marple Ph. 2-880
FOR RENT
SINGLE Room near campus. Ph
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WEEK-END GUESTS? Rooms availa
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Bureau, 2-8827, 6:30-8:30 p.m. )
VACANCY for 2 male students in a s
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For Good Accommodations
Bring your overnight or
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