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February 19, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. . ........ - . . ......... .... .... ... ... .... .....

PERSONAL MATTER:
Adams' Places Responsibility
Above Rights in Democracy

papersiews
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-1

POLITICAL SIDELIGHT:
UMT Lobby in Washui'toin
Works To Defeat Lerislation

By LILIAS WAGNER
To preserve the democracy
which we now have, we must nev-
er take it for granted and must
look for the good in it, Provost
James Adams said at the speech
assembly yesterday.
Provost Adams, whose present
position involves administration
of the educational functions of
the University, pointed out the
Debaters Face
Iowa Today
The University's busy varsity
debate team will take on the Uni-
versity of Iowa squad at 4 p.m.}
today in Kellogg Auditorium for
the fourth intercollegiate debate
'of the season.
Taking the negative side of the
question, "Resolved: that a feder-
al world government should be
established" will be Ben Vanden-
Belt, '48, and Frank Nelson, '48
for Michigan. Change-in-opinion
ballots will' be used in determin-
ing the audience reaction to the
discussion.

fact that this country suffered
none of the ravages of wair, but
that there is stall social confusion.
Rights and Privileges
"We put our rights and privi-'
leges before our responsibility," he
observed. "We seem to have tle
new political habit of asking the
government for things we can't
get ourselves. We seek peace and
justice in the world,. yet accept
conflict in solving industrial dis-
putes"
However, democracy is not be-
stowed from without, he explai -
ed. The freedoms enjoyed by
Americans "reach into a man's in-
ner system," Dr. Adams comment-
ed. "Nothing could compensate a
man for the loss of his soul."
Freedoms Preserved
Simply because we have pre-
served our freedoms, while others
have lost them, we are not per-
ed," he added. "Nothing is per-
fect as long as our hopes and
dreams exceed, our accomplish-
ments."
"The quality of democracy de-
pends on the moral fibre of the
people and their devotion to free-
dom, justice, and truth," Provost
Adams concluded. '

'

F

EXCLUSIVE TERRITORY NOW OPEN
FOR PIERCE DICTATION WIRE RECORDERS
An opening in Ann Arbor now exists for one and possibly two under-
graduates with sales ability to represent us in the selling and distri-
bution of the famous government-approved Peirce dictation wire
recorders.gSome of these machines now are in use by the University
of Michigan. The earnings potential is impressive and the com-
missions are excellent. Only one with some engineering background
or knowledge of electrical equipment will be considered. Interviews
Saturday from 8:30 A.M. to 2 P.M. For an appointment write, phone
or wire
THE TRUE RECORDER CO.
701 Donovan Bldg, 2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit 1
Telephone: Randolph 5944
NOTICE.-

rr

There are letters assigned to the box numbers of the following
persons. They should be claimed immediately if desired.
We keep them only a limited time.

Bender, Ozzie
Brown, R. S.
Buckley, F. V.
Gram, Mrs. L. M.
Jadrosich, Ruth
Healy, Win.

Noris, Zada
Reade, Max
Rumig, R.
Snyder, Harry
Vande Sande, Ceo,
WUeebsler, Herb

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LOOK, MA, NO IIANDS!-Bill Salot, '50F, easily defeats both ob rIotlh, 50IAd tan Jim Bron,
'50F&C, in a blindfold dual checker nmiateh. Bill, who has found little .compettion here, recently
claimed the National Junior Checker Championship, which was vacated when the last champ
became 21 years old. He promises to play all challengers blindfolded.
REAL MASSACRE':
Blindfolded Checker ChamVETERANS'
Takes Two Games at Once
By CRAIG WILSON checkers,in Redford High School Disabled veterans may continue
Playing two games of checkers study hall instead of studying, their educational training longer
t once isn't so hard-bu.t try Salot, who was then 13 years old, than the usual four years if neces-
inning the pair while blindfolded found his punishment consisted of sary to attain ti] vocational
playing checkers with the assist- objective, according to Veterans
s Bill Salot, '50E, does. ant principal. He lost the first Administration officials.
Bill, who claims the National games, but improved rapidly Veterans effected by this ruling
unior Checker Crown since the enough to hit a winning stride are those so severely disabled that
ist holder became of age, "really over his teacher by the end of the no training course would restore
assacred" his two opponents, semester. them to employability in four'
ob Roth, '50BAd., and Jim Another match years, and those who lose time
Irown, '50F&C, who are admit- One month later, Bill entered a because of poor health. Applica-
edly novice checker players. Oiecker match at the Detroit tion for extension may be made
ikes to Relax Chess and Checker Foundation, through regional offices in De-
If there are' no blindfolds where forty of the city's best play- ti'it, Cleveland, Cincinnati and
andy, Bill likes to relax in a ers took on Newell Banks, a world Loisville.
oft chair turned away from his champion, simultaneously. No one
hallengers and "visualize" with- defeated the old master, but Salo Veterans presently enrolled for
ut aid' or mirrors, the check- gained one of thle few draw study who discontinue thei' train-
rboard's numbered squares, while games. ing under the G.I. Bill before they
he moves are called out to him Bill has even had several have exhausted their eligibility
rom the other end of the room. "checker problems" published in time must obtain a "supplemental
Reprimanded for playing chess and checker magazines. certificate of eligibility"
-- - All graduate students invited: sored by Graduate Outing Club,
Silence is requested. 8-10 p.m~ Women's Athletic Bldg.
DAILY Everybody welcome. Small feee.
1 The Association of University of
OFFICIAL Michigan Scientists calls the at- Student Chapter of the National
tention of its members to a talk by Lawyers' Gild: 4:15 p.m., Rm. 100
BULLETIN Di. G. Milland on "The Social In- Hutchins Hall. Robert Kenny,
plications of the Atomic Bomb" at President, of the National Law-
8 p.m. in St. Andrews Church. )1D i t rGs'Guild ani counsel to' the
(Coitinued from Page 4) vision and Catherine Sieets. "Ifullywood Ten," w ill speak on
'"Tle i111 of RiguLs Today.' All
Big Nine Debate between Uni- Tau Beta Pii meeting will be s tudents and faculty members iii-
ersity of Michigan and the Uni- held in Rm. 3505, E. Engineering
ersity of Iowa, 4 p.m., Thurs., Bldg., instead of the Union.
eb. 19, Kellogg Auditorium. "Re- All Michigan Men who have Inter-racial Association: 7:30
ever been Boy Scouts are invited p.m., Michigan Union.
olved That a Federal World Gov-toaS keinheMcgnU-
to a Smoker in the Michigan Un~... ._.
rnment Should be Established." ion Ballroom at 7:30 p.m. Spon- Co in a Events
sored by Alpho Phi Omega Fra-
raduate School Record Concert: ternity. The Thomas M. Cooley Lectures,
second series, will be delivered by
7:45 p.m., East Lounge, Rack- Burke Shartel of the Law School
am Bldg. Gargoyle: Tryout meeting, 4 on February 23, 24, 25, 26, and 27
Mozart: Quintet in D Major, p.m., Student Publications Bldg., in ?m. 120, Hutehins Hall, 4:15
.593: Budapest Quartet; M. Ka- 420 Maynard St. p.m. Topic: "Our Legal System
ims, Viola. -andlow It Operates." The pub-
Meeting of Sphinx, 7:30 p.m. at lie is invited.
Bloch: Schelomo: Feuermann the Union. Election 1of officers to Geology and Mineralogy Jour-
'ello; Stokowski Cond, Philadel- be held. nal Club: Mr. David Hawley, of
Aida hi''l - Columbia niversity, will speak on
Bach: Goldberg Variations: International Center weekly tea: tie F ubjct, "ouldr-illd trac-
nkHarpshard. 4:30-5:30 pm. Hostesses: Mrs. F. hyte dikes along Lake Champlain
~ _~_C. Klein and Mrs. Rafaelita Sor- in Vermont" (black and white
ano. All Barbour scholars are slides), Fri., Feb. 20, 12 noon, Rm.
especially invited. 3055 Natural Science Bldg. Open
meetTINin.
U. of M. Radio Club: 7:30 p.m..
(Siuce 1899) Rm. 1084, E. Engineering Bldg. Delta Epsilon Pi: Initial meet-
W80SP, Mr. Jack Cline will speak ing, Fri., Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m., Rin.
Inspect our clean, main floor on "Tuning Transmitters." New 305, Michigan Union. All former
daylight plant, with all new members welcome. members urged to attend. Any
modern presses. male student who is of Hellenic
United World Federalists: Mem- descent or is a Philhellene is in-
e hprs and ros c retive membersare vited.

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.
G. I. Requisitions Accepted

I

"It takes
charm,
poise and

.
.
'
J t
i/ j
ti
4' /jy

The ' eade of sinil lowfn news-
papers is fat becomin a citizen
tf i u wnl in theestimation
(, A rthur . tace, editor of the
Si \ itjo'ur-
rzli f;istdet. eserdyStace
saidi thatTh e interests
ave a d Thr ae now part
o the omld, and t ha result-
(1 inahngein e i'pipers."
Newspaers (nge
''h('ilijea11(daily newspap-
e'i has cl anged1it:s services with
changing social and economic con-
;itions'
"Readers," he noted, "are de-
manhing more toxerage of a bet-
ter quahty, and they prefer their
news condensed because of the
large amount to cover."
Reporters' Ca liber
"This change has also resulted
in a change in the caliber of the
reporters wanted," he explained.
'While we once recruited our
writers from high schools, we now
prefer the collee graduate."
'The graduate from college who
desires to be a reporter," he end-
ed, "should have a general all-
around education, but be prepared
to develop along special lines dur-
ing his reporting career."
Stace vas speaking in the first
of a series of lectures to be given
by the University during the se-
mester, on different phases of
journalism.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of two interpretative articles by Daily
reporters present at the UMT confer-
ence in lwashini'ton. l).C., last week-
end.
By PAT JAMES and
DON McNEIL
A constant juggling by opposing
forces to gain control marked the
Washington Conference against
Universal Military Training-the
most heterogeneous group to unite
under a common banner.
But even if nothing else ap-
peared definite the basic unanim-
ity of the group on the problem
of UMT was as evident as their
blue - white buttons - "Defeat
UMT."
Other Conflicts
Conflict existed not on UMT but
on the struggle to force side-line
issuesgnto the limelight.
From beginning to end, Com-
munists were zealously at work
on the Party Line. Led by the
dynamic personality of Paul Rob-
eson, who barely mentioned UMT
in his talk, they hammered away
at "capitalistic militarism."
While other speakers talked, a
part of the assembly had con-
tinuously interrupted with stamp-
ing of the feet and cries of."We
want Robeson." When the singer
went up on the platform, the
crowd rose almost as one, in thun-
derous applause.
Conservative Factor
More conservative factor was
Rev. John Darr, Congregational
minister and ardent anti-UMT
speaker. Delegates also included
students from denominational
colleges such as Hillsdale.
The group that left from Ann

Arbor was typical in its unanim-
ity and conflicting differences.
Wallace for President groups
passed out pamphlets cailling or
students to give him their sup-
port, and "Wallace '43" buttons,
bearing a pict ure of Wallace su-
perimposed on a lprofile of Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt, soon appeared
beside the UMT empblems on
their lapels.
BARGAINS
Annual sale of sample ltath-
er items in luding b lifolds,
purses, bildg-e s J-.,ewel
boxes, compacts, pic ture
frames, and various other
items.
All at 1/2 price or less
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Ph. 9533
"Home of 3-Hour
Odorless Dry Cleaning"
C LEAN E RS
630 South Ashley
Phone 4700

I -

At MICHIGAN
BAYARD
RAMSAY
smokes
CHESTERFIELDS

THE MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED DEPT.

p -n.

1'

')1777

a

}

lie say- s:
"I like
caus IIS like
arelle and
just thal."

Chesterfields be-
a light iild cig-
Chesierffelds are

d"k1

i

A nation-wide survey shows
that Chesterfields are TOPS
with College Students from
coast-to-coast.

// RESOLD
"lIr1o D ATIrgtvR6
See them in Detroit at ERNST KERN . CROWLEY MILNER
Free booklet: "WARDROBE TRICKS". Write Judy Bond, Inc., Dept. P, 1375 Broadway, New York 1

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_: t r
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FOR THE GIBSON GIRL'S GRAND-DAUGHTER

"I

Programs, T ickets,
Posters,
or what have you
"Our Location Makes
the Trip Worthwhile"
GOETZCRAFT
PRINTERS, INC.
Downtown, 308 N. Main
Just North of Main
Downtown Post Office

urged to attend the debate this af-
ternoon at 4 p.m., Kellogg Audi-
torium, between the University of
Iowa and the University of Mich-
igan. Also the lecture tonight by
Mortimer Adler, member of the
Committee to Frame a World Con-
stitution. 8.p.m., Rackham Bldg.
La p'tite causette: 3:30 p.m.,
Grill Room, Michigan League.
Square Dancing Class, spon-

I

_ __

Hindustan Association: 7:30
p.m., Fri., Feb. 20, Lane Hall.
Kindai Nippon Kenkyukai: Din-
ner, Sat., Feb. 21, International
Center. Charge per person. Phone
2-2218 not later than Thursday
for reservations.
B'nai B'rith Foundation: Friday
Evening Services, 7:45 p.m. Fire-
side discussion: "Your Chances for
a Job in 1948." Social hour.
Cornedbeef Corner of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation will be
open from 10:30 to midnight Sat-
urday. All students are invited to
use this service.
Morrocan
doll

\ h
O <
Ray
Pict
Sh
with

5000 WOMEN
consider The Daily
an important part
of their university
education .. 0

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