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February 19, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THIURSDAY,'

. . . ....... .

FOR LATIN TYPES.-
Spanish Club Provides
Ke to Biiligual Livingr

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
in a series of language club profiles.
Habla Vd. espanol?
By FREDRICA WINTERS
If you are a Spanish student or
interested in improving your
knowledge of Spanish life and
language, La Sociedad Hispanica
offers a fine opportunity.
The Spanish club, founded in
199 is one of -the oldest organ-
rations on campus. Its activities
are variedand designed to arouse
the students' interest in the lit-
erature and culture of Spain and
Latin America.
Annual Lectures
Every year the club sponsors a
series of lectures, the majority of
which are delivered in Spanish.
Lecturers come from the Spanish
department, other departments of
Grains Come
Out of Slump
In LateRally
CHICAGO, Feb. 18-(/P)-A late'
rally pulled some grains out of
their price slump today in a ses-
sion that held mostly bad news for
consumers.
The government reported that
the nation's meat-on-the-hoof
supply is the, lowest since 1939.
This news caused a temporary
slump in grains. Prices rallied
later, however, on trade reports
that unfavorable weather was en-
dangering the new wheat crop in
the Southwest.
The most cheerful note for the
housewife's food budget was the
weakness in butter prices, both in
the wholesale markets on the Chi-
cago mercantile exchange. Whole-
sale butter declined % to 1% cents
a pound in Chicago and 1 to 2
cents in New York.
On the Chicago exchange,
where butter is sold for future de-
livery, prices broke as much as 2%
cents.
Butter trade sources said favor-
able weather for pasture growth
and lower grain feed prices indi-
cate that butter production is due
to spurt soon. As a result, many
merchants are accumulating only
the supplies they need for imme-
diate requirements. This is de-'
pressing wholesale prices.
Positions open
On Union Staff
Men who were unable to attend
the Union tryout smoker yester-
day may receive information con-
cerning the position on the vari-
ous student committees from 3 to
5 p.m. any tday this week in thet
Union Student Offices.
Positions are open on ,all five
committee: social, 'campus af-
fairs, publicity, administration,
and house. Valuable experience
in office procedure and public re-
lations can be gained by partici-
pating in one of the student com-
mittees, members of the Union
Executive Council pointed out.-
After the preliminary tryoutt
period, students become eligiblei
for election to the Union Execu-
tive Council, which plans and
carries out all Union sponsorede
functions.'
All tryouts are eligible to work
on Michigras, the annual all-t
campus carnival to be held this
spring.-
PRINTING

for
Posters - Handbills
Programs - Tickets
done at
RAMSAY-CANfIEL D
119,East Liberty
(Acrossr from P-Bell)
a Phone 7444 b
(X==XX=>(X=X '' <

the University, and Wayne Uhi
versity in Detroit.
Prof. Mercado, faculty adviso
to the group, said that second yea
Spanish students could easily un-
derstand the lectures.
In addition to hearing good
Spanish at the lectures, speaking
the language is stressed at con-
versation meetings held weekly.
Although these meettings are
supervised by a member of the
faculty, the students do all the
talking on any subject they may
choose. Teeacher steps in only
to clear up a moot point, or the
Spanish equivalent thereof.,'
Play Project
The main project of the club
each year is a play which is pre-
sented at the Lydia Menclssohn
Theatre on two successive nights.
This year the play is to be "Nu-
estra Natacha," by Casona, direct-
ed by Mr. Pasquariello of the
Spanish department, with a cast
chosen from the 250 members of
the club.
The club has seen two Spanish
movies this year, and is expect-
ing to present another during the
semester.
Scholarships
Club dues are used to give schol-
arships to three members of the
club deemed worthy by club offi-
cers and Prof. Mercado to attend
the summer session at the Na-
tional University of Mexico, in
Mexico City. Prof. Mercado said
that members are so enthusiastic
about the idea, that generally fif-
teen or twenty non-scholarship
students attend the University of
Mexico summer school also.
Prof. Mercado said that the
club aims to supplement the
Spanish learned in the classroom
and show the student the value
of being bilingual.
Library Gets
Historie Plate
The original copper plate from
which British army maps were
printed for the campaign of York-
town have been added to the
Clements Library's collection of
American Revolution materials.
The plates for the maps, which
showed fortifications of the York-
town area, were presented on be-
half of the British Admiralty by
D. F. H. Brickell, British Consul
General in Detroit. The Clements
Library holds 13 of the manu-
script maps of the Yorktown cam-
paign, including a map used by
British General Henry Clinton.
The British Admiralty is donating
to American libraries the copper
plates from which all the British
campaign maps of the Revolu-
tionary War were printed, Dr.
Randolph G. Adams, director of
the Library, disclosed.
Prison Problem
Will Be Discussed
Problems of prison management
and criminology will be the cent-
er of attention at the first annual
meeting of the Michigan Correc-
tion Association, to be held Friday
in Detroit.
Highlighting the meeting, which
will be attended by people inter-
ested in improving Michigan's
correctional institutions, will be
a talk by Prof. John B. Waite, of
the Law School.
President of the association is
Prof. A. E. Wood, of the sociology
department, who, together with
several other men interested in
correct prison mangement, and
factors operating in the lives of
criminals, organized the associa-
tion last year.
Other matteis facing discussion
by the group are methods of keep-

ing prisons out of politics, im-
proving the status of prisons and
various fields of research into
criminology.
Prof. Schwartz To Talk
Prof. Frank L. Schwartz of the
mechanical engineering depart-
ment will address the Western
Michigan section of the Society
of Automotive Engineers in Mus-
kegon tonight.
His topic will be: "Gas Tur-
bines for Vehicles."
Sheeps kin Shortage
Bad weather in England during
last winter has caused a shortage
of sheepskins for diplomas this
year so most of the "skins" passed
out twill be high quality paper.
cvrrent
rat7
N M AVIN M t S

,r

dAnnual Exhibit
Of Advertising1
Art onDisplay
Winge(I Victory and
Cheesecake Compete
That group of photographs,
drawings and paintings that sep-
arate the stories and articles in
N our favorite magazine is now be-
ing referred to as "Art," and with
a capital "A."
Only a few yards from the Uni-
versity's reproduction of the fam-
ed monument "Victory of Samo-
thrace" hangs the proof. For
there in Alumni Memorial Hall's
Art Gallery hangs the 26th annual
exhibit of Advertising Art, now on
its transcontinental tour.
Very few examples of the popu-
lar leg or cheesecake "art" are to
be found. Present are a few brush
and ink fashion sketches of women
in bathing suits. but these sket-
ches are designed to appeal prim-
arily to women. The other ex-
ample of this "art," is a photo-
graph of the rear view of a re-
clining model.
The collection also includes
paintings used in advertisements
for phonographs. containers, and
diamond merenahts. A box top
design for a fashionable depart-
ment store, as well, is among the
varied group.
However, the attendance for the

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Campus Highlights

am

Dancing Classes..
A series of eight classes in so-
cial dancing will begin at 8 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 20, at the Interna-
tional Center.
Taught by a professional in-
structor formerly with the Ar-
thur Murray studios, the classes
are open to all foreign students
and their American friends.
Men taking the lessons will be
charged a nominal fee for the
course. Women are invited to at-
tend the classes free, as part-
ners. Mrs. Mead, assistant to the
director, will act as hostess for
the women guests.
* * *
Hillel Services...
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun-
dation will hold its Friday Eve-
ning Services at 7:45 p.m.
Immediately following the
services, Mr. Albert Cohen, di-
rector of the Vocational Service
in Detroit will speak on "Your
Chances for a Job in 1948."
* * *

will hold their first meeting of
the semester today at 7:30 p.m.
at the League.
Rev. John Miles of the Peoples
Institute of Applied Religion in
Detroit will address the group on
the subject, "Racial Discrimina-
tion, Past and Future."
* * *
'Campus Quarter'..
A meeting will be held for
anyone interested in working on
the various committees of the
Campus Quarter, the student
directed and produced radio
show, at 5 p.m. today in the
League Ballroom.
' Mixer DaInces .. .
The League and the Union will
co-sponsor the first in a series of
mixer .dances from 2 to 5 p.m.
Saturday in the League Ball-
room.
Tom McNall and his orchestra
with Jackie Ward, featured vo-
calist, will provide the music.

Daily-Patterson.
BRIDGE -IN THE UNION . . . a small section o f the group that played in the National Inter-
collegiate Bridge Tournament last weekend.

Bridge Players Crowd Unio
ballroom in National Contest

By GEORGE WALKER
Had you walked into the Union
Ballroom last weekend you would
have been confronted with a scene
quite different from that usually
seen at a Friday or Saturday
night dance.
Crowded into the north half of
Professor
Sheds Light
Son Fish Life
The life of a fish in the Great
Lakes and neighboring bodies of
water is no longer the cloistered,
secret thing that it was.
Prof. Karl F. Lagler, of the zoo-
logy department, has seined, net-
ted and hooked the finny creatures
out of their seclusion and, in col-
laboration with Prof. Carl L.
Hubbs of the University of Cali-
fornia Scripps Institute of Oce-
anography, has written a most
revealing book about them en-
titled "Fishes of the Great Lakes
Region."
First Work
The first complete work of its
kind, the volume is valuable to
ichthyologists as well as sports-
men. It supplies information on
the habits of each fish family, pro-
cedures of collecting and pre-
serving fish, and angling methods
for game fish. Unlike other books
on the subject (and herein lies its
hope of hitting the best seller list)
it tells not only how to catch fish.
but where to catch them.
Prof. Lagler's field work was
impeded at times by frozen ,.ater,
limestone filled nets, Lake Huron
storms, and once by a split boat.
The periodic expeditions, which
extended from the summer of 1925
to Nov. 1947, resulted however, in
a huge collection of fish by refer-
ence to which regional distribu-
tion maps were drawn.
Fish Listed
Among the rare fish listed in the
book are the paddlefish, which is
distinguished by a paddle-like
nose and large size, and the Amer-
ican eel, which is interesting
chiefly in that it shouldn't be
found in land-locked waters at
all.
According to Prof. Lagler the
eels were planted 60 to 75 years
ago by Dutch settlers in Michigan
who had a taste for pickled eel
but little knowledge of the eel's
breeding habits. Inasmuch as eels
don't spawn in fresh water, any
that are caught in. Michigan can
be assumed to be at least 60 years
old.
The limits of the ranges of each
type of fish, that is the general
region in which it lives and moves
about, are given in lists compiled
by Prof. Lagler based on his own
collecting forays and on previous
data of Prof. Hubbs.
Help Urged for
Fiish Students
The University's Committee on
Intercultural Relations has writ-
ten to Senator Vandenberg, en-
dorsing a Senate joint resolution
for aid to Finnish students.
The resolution provides that
money received from Finland in
payment on her debt to this coun-
try from World War I, "be used
to provide educational and tech-
nical instruction and training in
the United States for citizens of
Finland."
The University has now two
students from Finland: Nils En-
kvist, Grad., in speech science;
and Eino Kainlauri, '48 Eng., in
civil engineering.
Chairman of the University
committee is Dr. Essen M. Gale,

director of the International Cent-
er and counselor to foreign stu-
dents.
The flowers of the calla lily, ac-
cording to the World Book Ency-
clopedia, are not the beautiful

I

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the ballroom were some 120 bridge
players, hunched over several doz-
en tables; muttering at brief in-
tervals a hesitant "three hearts"
or "Four spades." Every several
minutes the entire congregation
would rise and shift through the
smoky room to another table,
where hands prepared by the Na-
tional Intercollegiate Bridge
Tournament Committee awaited
them.
This was the first phase in a
tournament which may take some
of the contestants to the national
finals at Chicago. The twelve
highest scorers in the round will
play an additional set of prepared
hands and from these two players
will be sent to the Chicago com-
petition.
The Tournament is an annual
affair sponsored by the Union,
under the direction of Keith Jor-
don and Bob Holland of the Union
executive council.
Mrs. S. J. Shank, who is noted
in this region as a bridge expert,
officiated at the tournament.
Hitchcock Thriller
Comes to (aHipizs
"The Lady Vanishes," classic
mystery thriller directed by Alfred
Hitchcock, will be shown at 8:30
p.m. this Sunday and Monday at
the Kellogg Auditorium.
A short, '"The Feeling of Rejec-
tion," will be shown along with
this film. The films are being pre-
sented by the Art Cinema League
and the Student World Federal-
ists.
Tickets will be sold from 10 a.m.
to noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. at
University hall. Tickets will also
be available at Kellogg Audito-
rium the nights of the perform-
ances.

Label Laund ry
Sent in Mail,
Students Told
Students were requested to put
their name and address inside
their laundry cases when they
sent them through the mails yes-
terday by assistant postmaster A.
J. Mayer.

IR Meeting .
The Inter - racial

Association

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"It sometimes happens that the
address on the outside of the caseI
is lost," Mayer said, "and if there
is a duplicate within the case on
top of the laundry, it can be iden-
tified.
Mayer assumed that many stu-
dents who failed to receive their
laundry cases simply gave them
up for lost. "This is not neces-
sary," he said.
As long as no written message
is packed in the case, ae inclu-
sion of name and address is per-
missible, Mayer said. "It is against
the law to enclose any letters in
such cases, unless they are sent
first class."
Laundry cases which are lost
in the mails usually end up in
the dead parcel office of a large
city post office. Unless they are
claimed within six months, they
are sold at auction by the postai
authorities.
Tickets for Soph Prow.
o Go 0ott Sale Today
Tickets for Soph Prom, featur-
ing Phil Levant and his orchestra,
to be presented from' 9 p.m. to 1
a.m. Friday, March 5 in the Un-
ion Ballroom, will go on sale to-
day.
The tickets for sophomores only
will be sold from 9 a.m. to noon
and from 1 to 4 p.m. today and
tomorrow and from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday in the University Hall
booth. General ticket sales will
begin next week.

museum is under par, but this is
attributed to the slushy weather
by a museum official. "After all,"
as one attending student put it,"
you don't even have to turn the
pages of your magazine."
Chopstick 1)inner
Kindai Nihon Kenkyn Kai, the
Japanese club, is giving a suki-
yaki dinner, 6:30 Saturday at In-
ternational House.
The dinner will be eaten with
chopsticks from authentic Jap-
anese bowls. Those interested in
attending can contact Judy Yosh-
ihara at 2-2181.
At MICHIGAN
EILEEN
HICKEY
smokes
CH ESTERF I ELDS
She says:
"Aly c(hoice is C;heserfields
becausethey are mild and
tigbtl packed. I1never tire
of the, r laste."
A nation-wide survey shows
that Chesterfields are TOPS
with College Students from
coast-to-coast.

STOP

losing valuable time
Students, save yourself
time and money!
The Ann Arbor Business School
offers you classes in
Typing & Shorthand
to be taken in your free hours during the day or
in night classes. Veterans may receive this in-
struction under the G.I. Bill, albng with your
University courses
sei ts for particulars.
ANN ARBOR
BUSINESS SCHOOL
330 Nickels Arcade

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Phone 2-0330

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jJj~p

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