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April 02, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-02

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___ __ ___ ___"_ __ __THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Wolverine Swimmers Launch BidforA 4L

PAGE THRE
Crown

TRIPLE TERROR:
Pete Elliott Turns To Golf,
Bolsters 'M' NCAA Chances

By L. E. NELSON
Michigan's versatile young red-.
head, Pete Elliott, will be taking
to the fairways shortly to direct
his talents toward bringing the
Wolverines another golf cham-
pionship and, perhaps, another,
NCAA title.
Things were looking pretty dis-
mal last spring about this time.
Not a single Michigan squad had
taken a Big Nine title. The chips
were down in the final Conference
struggle, of the year. Elliott was
usually in the fifth position or not
playing at all during the spring's
dual matches.
Came Through in Clutch
Nevertheless, it was Pete who
came through with an unexpect-
ed Conference victory that kept
the Wolverines from takingkan
athletic whitewashing.
In the fall of 1945 the Bloom-
ington, Illinois product spear-
headed Fritz Crisler's last "teen-
aged" football eleven. Pete was a
member of the Navy's V-12 pro-
gram here on the campus.
Pete was a pretty versatile com-
petitor on that club. He ran,
Y kicked and passed from his left
half position and in general con-
ducted himself in a very "offen-
sive" way.
But the following fall found all
the older veterans back on the
old stamping grounds and it was
necessary for Pete to become one
of Crisler's specialists.
Strictly Defensive
Elliott was the new defensive
quarterback only; he didn't run,
he didn't kick, he didn't pass. Next
fall Coach Oosterbaan will give
the talented Pete a new gridiron
role, that of ball-handling offen-
sive quarterback.
When winter came three years
ago, Pete decided to try his hand
at basketball. Now after three sea-
sons of competition, they call him
one of the nation's leading defen-
sive players.
Certain scoring machines named

Detroit Stops
Rangers, 3-1, in
NHL Play-off
Two Goals by Kelly
Pace Redwing Attick
DETROIT. April 1-(i---Two
goals by rookie red-headed de-
fenseman Len Kelly put the De-
troit Red Wings one-up on the
New York Rangers tonight in
their best-of-seven National
Hockey League playoff series as
Detroit took the fifth game 3 to 1
before 13,442 fans.
Kelly, a steady young defense-
man who rarely stars in the Red
Wing scoring, was the big show on
attack tonight, slamming a 60-
foot shot that dribbled past Rang-
er goalie Chuck Rayner on the
short hop early in the first period.
Then he outran Bryon Hextall
for a free puck at the boards late
in the game, soloing in to ham-
mer a 15-foot shot past Rayner to
clinch the Red Wings' "key" vic-
tory in the hot series.
Pete Horeck, Detroit right wing,
scored the other Red Wing goal
midway of the second period on a
fast play with Gordon Howe and
Buddy O'Connor slapped a six-
foot poke past Detroit goalie Har-
ry Lumley to crack his shutout
midway of the final stanza.
By coming back to crack New
York's two-game winning streak,
the Red Wings moved into posi-
tion to close out the Rangers by
taking the sixth game of the se-
ries Sunday night in New York. A
seventh game, if necessary, will
be played here next Tuesday.
Detroit's first two goals both
came with a Ranger in the pen-
alty box.

JuT KIBITZING
E VERYBODY HAS a different theory about Fritz Crisler's plans.
Spoelstra of the Detroit News claims he is going to work for a
Chicago concern, while the Times and Free Press have the 'Great
Man' signed up with the Murray Company of Detroit. Other people
have him working with Harry Kipke for the Coca Cola company.
Now, I have a theory, too. Like everyone else's, its original, based
on nothing Crisler has said, but on reports of reports from close friends
of Fritz.
Now, keep this under your hats. It's only a theory, but it's
a sound one. Crisler is going to run for President.
The Republicans probably approached him with an offer and he
"no comment" himself right past Dewey into the favor of the GOP
bosses.
I figure that shortly after that, the Democrats also approached
Fritz to find out how he would like second place on the Truman ticket.
He probably told them that Truman was a fine fellow in about sixty
ways without, of course, committing himself. But the way I have it
doped out, when that delegation left, they had Fritz slated to head the
ticket which will boom Jeff Craveth for Vice-President.
AT THIS TIME, both the Republicans and the Democrats are se-
cretly certain, that Crisler is their boy and will be the next presi-
dent.
And a week or so before the Republican convention, the Hearst
papers will simultaneously issue an editorial saying "Did we Say
Doug? Oh, sorry, that was just a typo, we meant Frity."
So now, we have Crisler in the White House. What happens then?
Just this. He speaks of the shape of the country. Naturally Russia lis-
tens in. In the space of three press conferences, Fritz has them be-
lieving this country is so weak that they demobilize the entire Red
Army, and replace it with a battalion of women sporting brand new
baseball bats.
It wouldn't be anything difficult for him. Ask Craveth? If
war is inevitable, a week or so before it breaks out Fritz would let
it slip out that the entire Air Force has a sprained ankle. The
Russians get overconfident and its ov~r in two weeks.
On domestic issues he would eliminate all strife because the Re-
publicans, Northern and Southern Democrats, and even the Prohi-
bitionists would all come away from Presidential Conferences think-
ing they had the President's support. And actually all he would have
said to any of them would probably be "Well, you may be right."
Now, as I said this is only a theory, but it sounds logical and it is
one worth considering. Also think of how wonderful it would be.
Imagine Congress working out of a single wing.

la U Mann III Grabs Third
Place in 1500 Meter Event

Jack Talor, Akron.
Takes First; McLane
NEW HAVEN, Conn., April 1-
Maltt Mann III, Michigan's Big
Nine champion and NCAA run-
nucup in the 1500-meter event
was upset by two swimming un-
knowns last night as the Wolver-
ines began their bid to add the
AAU indoor crown to their already
impressive list of laurels.
With Jimmy McLane, the sen-
Matt Mann's list of letter
winners on this ,year's swim-
ming Team lines upeas follows:
Receiving major awards were
Captain Harry Holiday, Tom
Coates, Art Johnson, Bill Cris-
pin, Bill Kogen, Johnny Mc-
Carthy, Jay Sanford, Bob Sohl,
Gus Stager, Dave Tittle, Ralph
Trimborn, Bill Upthegrove, Irv
Einbinder, Gil Evans, and Dick
Weinberg.
Freshman numeral winners
were John Arbuckle, Bill Aus-
tin, Jack Barnes, Bob Byberg,
John Donaldson, George Ey-
ster, Jim Hartman, Harry Hill-
man, Dave Hosbein, Bernie
Kahn, Frank Keller, Tom
Smith and Charles Wagner.
sational schoolboy from Andover
Academy, unable to compete be-
cause of the press of studies,
Mann was favored to win, but a
17-year-old high school senior
from Akron, Ohio, upset the dope-
book.
He was Jack Taylor of Akron
Buchtel High, swimming for the

High School Senior
Forced To Withdraw
powerful Akron Firestone Clul
Taylor, who was swimming th
1500-meter distance in competi
tion for the first time, turned in
creditable 20:08.2 timing in th
Yale 50-meter pool.
Andy Lambert of Williams Col
lege edged Mann for second plac
covering the distance in 20:26.5
full four seconds faster tha
Mann's 20:30.6 timing.
This was the onay event on th
first night's program and it gav
Michigan four big points as th
Maize and Blue sought once agal
to unseat Ohio State's champio
Buckeyes through a powerful dcs
play of team- strength.
Twice before this year, in t
Big Nine championships and i
the NCAA meet, Michigan has de
throned the Buckeyes and the
powerful diving dynasty by t1
simple expedient of garnerin
points in every event, somethin
no other team was able to do.

GOOD LUCK CHARM?-Pete
Elliott who will be a key figure
in Michigan's drive for a second
straight golf championship. If
the Wolverines succeed it will
be the fourth straight chamn-
pionship athletic squad on
which Pete has played.
* * * *
Hoffman, Ritter, Schnittker,
Stricklen, Philip, Cook, Weir and
Kernan have experienced difficult
evenings under the shouting, arm-
waving working conditions im-
posed by Pete's guarding.
There has been a whispering
campaign making the rounds for
the past couple years that Mich-
igan's versatile redhead could do
Mr. Fisher and Mr. Doherty a lot
of good if he wasn't so adept in
the use of a brassie.

DISTANCE MAN (N) - Matt
Mann III, Michigan's fine dis-
tance swimmer who last night
added a third place in the Na-
tional AAU 1500-meter event to
his second place finish in the
NCAA and his triumph in the
Big Nine championships.
AISC IBeoins IDrills
EAST LANSING, April 1- --
There was more candidates than
uniforms on hand today as 1ead
Coach Clarence L. (Biggie) Munn
issued his first call for spring
football practice at Michigan
State College.

i B aseb all Round-up

How to
ST RETrc~
Your
Spring Vacation
' M ; W
-

i
i
1
1

TUCSON, Ariz., April 1-A)-
Bob Feller pitched six shut-out in-
nings as the Cleveland Indians
uncorked five runs in the seventh
for a 6-1 exhibition win over the
Chicago White Sox today.
The White Sox collected five
hits off Feller, but scored their
only run off Bill Kennedy in the
seventh. Ed. Robinson clouted a
Cleveland homer in the fourth and
Hank Edwards slammed a four
bagger in the big Tribe seventh.
SARASOTA, Fla., April 1-(/P)
-The Boston Red Sox today de-
feated their Louisville Colonel
farmhands 4-3 but the major
leaguers had to come from be-
hind with three runs in the
ninth to down the American
Association club.
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., April
1-(AP)-The Philadelphia Athletics
combined three hits, a walk and a
Toronto error in the fifth inning
today to whip the International
Leaguers 3 to 2 in an exhibition
game.
The A's spotted Toronto two
runs in the second inning while
the Maple Leafs found starter
Russ Christopher for three hits.

game that resulted in slight in-
juries for two Yankee first base-
men.
Keller played five innings, ap-
parently recovered from the spinal
operation that benched him last
summer. In three trips to the
plate, he walked twice and lined
out to the second baseman.
EL PASO, Tex., April 1--UP-- -
The Chicago Cubs today pounded
out 10 hits to defeat the St. Louis
Browns 5-0 in an exhibition base-
ball game in Juarez, Mex., across
the Rio Grande from here.
VERO BEACH, la., April 1-
(M-Lefty Joe Hatten became
the first Brooklyn pitcher to go
nine innings today as he turned
in a spectacular one-hit victory
over the Montreal Royals. The
score was 8 to 2.
It was Brooklyn's 16th straight
exhibition victory.
BRADENTON, Fla., April 1--0"
-Pushing across a run in the
last of the 10th inning the Boston'
Braves today edged the St. Louis
Cardinals 4-3 in a irc-5eason ex-
hibition.
Earl Torgeson dragged a bunt
past the pitcher's mound to open
the Tribal tenth, went to third
on a shot through the middle by
Bob Elliott and scored the winning
run on a long flyout.

Role of Finn
Gives Trouble
To'M' Guard
He knew it all the time!
"I've been going around with
blisters on my tongue trying to
keep it a secret," Qucntiii Sickels
said when he was informed that a
student had identified him as Mr.
Finn.
For weeks he's had to play in-
nocent around the Phi Kappa Psi;
house. "'The fellows around here
knew I had a brother at North-
western and that I had played
agaiis t h)iine in 1"14,'' Sickels
added.-
But hiding little known facts
has kept the Wolverine guard in
practice for this contest. It seems
that last season, Sickels went
through the entire campaign with
an "irritable" knee that might
have given out at any time..
In February, '47, he underwent
an operation which succeeded in
mending the knee for ordinary
circumstances, but Dr. Badgley
told him to stay away from foot-
ball. Afte'r thinking the matter
over, Sickels decided that if the
knee shculd ever stiffen, he'd nev-
er be able to play football again.
Sickels said, "I took my chances
and played with an intricate ban-
dage over it -during every game.
Nobody found out until I told my
parents before the Rose Bowl
game.

Baseball Squad Heads South;
Fisher To Take Seven Pitchers

Still searching for some pitch-
ing strength, Wolverine baseball
coach Ray Fisher has named
seven pitchers to a squad of 17
men that move out on the first leg
of an eight game southern trip
this morning.
In addition, two catchers, five
infielders and three outfielders
were named.
Art Dole, Bob Hicks, Bill Taft,
Ed Heikkinen, Bob Fancett,
Bud Rankin and Pat Morrison
will comprise the hurling staff,
while Bob Chappuis and Har-
old Raymond will share the
catching duties.
At first base, Fisher picked
rangy Hal Morrill who has
shown well in the few weeks that
he has been out. Veterans Dom
Tomasi and Jack Weisenburger
will again form Michigan's key-
stone combination and Ted Ko-
brin will hold down the third base
post. Ted Berce was named as a
utility infielder.
Three seasoned vets, Howie
Wikel, Bump Elliott, and Ralph
Morrison will patrol the Wol-
verine outergardens, with
Chappuis always available for
duty if necessary.
Bad weather made it possible
for the Wolverines to get outdoors
only twice and as a result, Fisher

declared that he is far from satis-
fied with the team's condition,
but that it was as good as possible
under the handicaps.
Fisher did not name a definite
starting lineup, but indicated that
it would probably run something
like Kobrin at lead off, Elliott
second, Morrison, third; Weisen-
burger in cleanup, Wikel fifth;
Morrill sixth, Tomasi seventh;
and the battery winding up the
batting order. He added that Bill
Taft would probably start the
first game.

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LAST WEEK of
14th Anniversary Sale
OR I ENTAL
RUGS
30% to 35% discount
on all our 9x12, 8x11
Throw and Hearth
Rugs, Runners and
s Mats. No Luxury Tax.
SN. L Mangouni
.334 S Fourth Ave.
Phonc 6878

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uwry1!

I HERE'S MORE TiME for holiday
fun when you take a safe and
dependable train. Leave and
arrive as planned. Zoom past
traffic jams. By-pass stormy
weather, skiddy roads in thrifty
modern coaches, cozy sleeping
' cars. Come back on the last pos-
sible train. See your ticket agent
for' convenient schedules, thrifty
fares. Or use return portion of
your Christmas "College Special"
ticket.
How to
STRETC
Your
Travel Dollar
Buy a new "College Special"
Round Trip ticket when you get
home. It's made-to-measure for
college men and women and
teachers who need longer round-
trip privileges. Use it for your
Spring trip back to college ...
and for going home after exams.
"College Special" tickets are on
sale from now until March 31st.*
Ask any ticket agent or Railroad
Representative about ticket costs,
return limits, stopover privileges.
For a Time ran
Money-Saving Trip

PHOENIX, Ariz., April 1-(M
-The New York Giants made
it five victories in six exhibition
baseball starts against the Pitts-
burgh Pirates today by downing
the Bucs, 6-5.
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla., April
1--)--Charley Keller started in
left field for the first time since
last June today as the New York
Yankees downed the Philadelphia
Phillies, 10-1, in an exhibition
BUY NOW
while selection
is still good!
RIDE AWA.

FORMAL
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All Sizes
egulars - Shrts
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ABItDAJJIA RIR S
119 South Main St.
Phone 6924
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rAL IE, T- Y UR MEASRE
S. . .the favorite fabrics for spring and
summer . , . for men and women , . . are
now featured in our stocks, ready for your
selection. Fine craftsmanship takes time . . .
so let us take your measure NOW . . . for
a suit made just for you . . is a style most
flattering to you.

Bring

in your best

Book Criticisms, Fiction,
Poetry, and Art Wor
For the First Issue c

Now you can ride an economi-
cal Cushman Motor Scooter
while paying for it ... and the
money you save over other
methods of transportation, pays
it,. r Cil...-nn,.. rnmain for

Am-wr
-A
cle4r

131c14!3an

LITERARY SUPPLEME

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