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April 02, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE iLCHIGAN DAILY

F-RiAY APRIL't.1:4

1 r a

R m-Huntiuo

VETO POWER UPHELD:
Students Attend Session
Of Mock UN Assembly
By ANDEE SEEGER
The United Nations could take a few pointers from a model UN
Assembly attended last weekend by three University students.
Representing the University-alias Brazil-at the National In-
tercollegiate Assembly of the United Nations were Jack Fritz, sent by
the speech department; Bill Miller, of the Student Legislature; and
Erwin Robinson, of the United World Federalists.

The Assembly, sponsored by a
Radio Show
Will Feature
Male Quartet
Campus Programs
HighlightWorkshop
A new 15-minute program fea-
turing a male quartet from the
Glee Club and the two student-
produced workshop programs,
"Journal of the Air" and "Radio
Workshop," will highlight campus
radio offerings this weekend.
"Michigan Profile," to be pre-
sented at 10 p.m. tomorrow over
WHRV by the University Broad-
casting Service, is a new song and
story program telling the life and
accomplishments of outstanding
Michigan alumni, faculty and stu-
dents.
Prof. Swinton's Story
The first program features the
story of Prof. Roy S. Swinton of
the engineering mechanics de-
partment, and his experience in a
Japanese prison camp during the
war. Songs by the quartet, con-
sisting of Rowland H. McLaugh-
lin, William R. Phebus, William
Jensen, and Jack Jensen will be
interspersed with the dialogue.
Bruce Hilkene will be inter-
viewed by John Carroll on "Mich-
igan Journal of the Air" at 6:15
p.m. tomorrow over WHRV. The
long-puzzled over question of life
on Mars will also be discussed in
a feature by Traverse DuVall. ...
Psychological Drama
"Sea Watch," a psychological
drama by Traverse DuVall, will be
heard over Michigan Radio Work-
shop at 10:45 p.m. Sunday. Roger
Shepard is director, and the cast
includes Norma Jean Auer, John
Benjamin and John Carroll.
"Radio Workshop," and "Jour-
nal of the Air" will not be heard
next weekend, but WHRV will
again air the programs the fol-
lowing week.
Hold Your :Bonds!

nd conducted at the University of
Chicago, was extremely realistic,
according to Miller. Bona fide lob-
byists were everywhere. Delegates
were even confronted at the en-
trance to the campus by a great
number of Zionist pickets.
Settle Down to Work
The conference was addressed
by Homer Winslow, of the United
States UN delegation; Dr. Oscar
Lange, chief UN delegate from
Poland; and Sen. Claude Pepper
(Dem., Fla.). After electing offi-
cers, the Assembly split into three
of the UN's seven major commit-
tees.
Miller said that one committee!
worked over the veto power, while
another tackled the question of an
international Bill of Rights, a
matter actually presented to the
UN recently by the NAACP.
Retain Veto Power
Committee recommendations
were referred back to the General
Assembly, which made final deci-
sions. Miller said that the Assem-
bly voted to retain the veto power,
saying that unanimity among the
Big Four was essential, and that
it was up to individual countries
to be more cooperative.
Acting on the proposed inter-
national Bill of Rights, the As-
sembly decided it couldn't inter-
fere in the internal affairs of any
country. However, it drew up such
a Bill of Rights and recommended
the Bill to the United States and
other countries.
The solution reached forvPales-
tins, said Miller, was a five-year
UN trusteeship, reviewed each
year by the General Assembly to
determine continuance. The five-
year period was to be followed by
a plebescite of Palestinians on
their future government.
The Assembly also approved the
committee's recommendation for
a police force to support the trus-
teeship, the force to be made up
of men from countries not on the
Security Council.
. Engineers Meeting
The Detroit Section of the In-
stitute of the Aeronautical Sci-
ences will sponsor the first an-
nual meeting of student chapters
here on April 12.

THE PLAYBOY-Newest of the small cars that have become
popular in recent years, the Playboy will be on the streets some-
time this summer. Having a top speed of 70 m .p.h., the ear gets
25 to 35 miles to the gallon.
PLAYBOY HITS TOWN:
JuirSz Atmbl
'Titv un o Si ADisplayed at Local (;ir a(ge
By JOAN KATZ ers, it was created to "meet the
and FREDI WINTERS demand for a junior size car that
^ " f r nir^' nn" v nn" ia

The
City Beat
Three boys that snatched a
purse from Cecilia Anisku, dental
student, late February 19, were
sentenced by Judge James R.
Breakey, Jr., in the Washtenaw
County Circuit Court, yesterday.
John Kampas, 19. of 1041 N.
Mlain St., was sentenced to 1 to 10I
years in Southern Michigan Pris-
on. with the minimum time rec-
ommended. Keith Parks. 18. of 808
N. Main St., and George Stacy. 20.
of 403 W. Summit St.. both wereI
assessed $275 in fines and costs{
and were placed on two years'
probation.
A Cassidy Lake Prison Farm
inmate who claims he can
"solve" the entire Hooper mur-!
der case, and a fellow escapee,j
were arraigned before Munici-
pal. Court Judge Jay H. Payne,
yesterday, on an escapĀ° charge.I
Alfred Kurner, 26, who said
his information was withheld
during the 19~4; Battle Creek
trial of four men implicated in
the slaying of state senator
Warren G. Hooper, and Stanley
Wrobel, 46, will be examined by
the court April 7.
John H. Zebbs, 70, of the Wash-
tenaw County Infirmary and
Hospital. died when he was struck
by a car driven by James A.
Phillips. 19, of 76 Golf View Lane.
The Accident occurred on M-17
near Washtenaw Rd.. at 2:45 a.m.
yesterday.
Phillips said that rain had ob-}
scured his vision. Zebb was clad
only in a dark blanket as he
sought to cross the highway. I
Muic',Gro ps
To ConVerI0c
On Ann Arbor
This weekend's mass exodus I
from Ann Arbor will be in part
offset by the gathering of nearly
500 musicians here for the annual
festivals of the Michigan Massed
Orchestra Association and Mich-
igan High School Solo and Small
Ensemble groups.
Other activities on the vacation

00o-Hni
Coeds Line Up
At Wee o~urs
About 125 "room-hungry coeds
formed a long line outside the
Dean of Women's Office yesterday
morning.
The coeds were applicants for
dormitory accommodations next
year, many of whom stood in line
for hours to be soune of ng
room assigtnments
At the head of the line were
three determined Willow Village
residents, Sally spiegelman. Mar-
cia Eyster. id Ellen Crowley.
who spent tlie ih-1t in town and
started the line at 4:30 a.m.
Coed Jane Williauns. now living
in a league hotse, reported lit
there were 34 women ahead of her
wlhen she got in line at G:15. From
then-on the line filled up quickly.
The line was eliminated withi
15 minutes after ithe Office
opened.
Dorm Officers
West Quad officers for the
spring term are: Charles West of
Winchell House, president: Scotu
Stewart of Adams House, secre-
tary; Phil Licht of Lloyd house,
treasurer; Bill Welke of Wenley
House, social chairman: Dick
Stafford of Winchell House,
sports chairman and Fred Klein of
Williams House, publicity chair-
man.
----- ---- - -

.1

Daily-Lipsey.
ANCIENT RITUAL PERFORMED-Sue Shmock, '48, and Fred
Ma'rks, '48, demonstrate how the campus wolf used to "operate."
The whistling custom is rarely heard on campus these days.
Women disapprove and men say they are too "oC(uiPied."
SUBTLETY PREFERRIED:
Coeds Ignore / olf-W hjsties
d e c l r h i 7TOB U I T HIL N ~on ,"on e at t active fem ale
and RAIGWILSN aimed. "But the women are do-
If you want me--don't whistle! lug- it. So there's probably more
That is the attitude of campus ithan ever."
coeds-now-that-he-wartime.ma-

(-)ut Tor a purely non i epoi ioria i z

E

walk, two Daily reporters spotted'
a crowd surrounding a car.
Anticipating an accident
"scoop," we dashed over to inves-
tigate. Pencils poised, we pre-
pared to find out the number
dead.
To our chagrin, however, we
discovered that the crowd wasn't
drawn by morbid curiosity, but by
the 1948 Playboy, newest addition
to the small car market.
We joined the crowd which was
slowly circling the maroon model
displayed at a local garage.
Compact Job
Advertised as the perfect "ex-
tra car," the Playboy measures a
compact 155 inches from head-
light to back bumper.
According to the manufactur-

will give big car performance.
The car has a top speed of 701
miles an hour and yields from 25
to 35 miles per gallon. One of
the advantages stressed by the
manufacturers is the all-steel
disappearing convertible top.
Orders Being Taken
Consulting the , garage owner
currently displaying the Playboy,
we learned that it is now being
shown in such widely diversified
locales as New York and Cuba.
He said orders are being taken,
but delivery is not expected until
sometime this summer.
Although the Playboy is fea-
tured as a car to be owned as an
adjunct to a larger one, its low
price and small space requirement
eculd easily sweep it into first
place with student car owners.

f

coeds now that the wartime maii-
power is over and the student ra-
tio is a healthy three-to-one in
favor of the women, a Daily sur-
vey discovered.
The wolf-whistle is officially
dead-along with the short skirt,
the Model T and tintypes.
Indifferent Females
Women are becoming indiffer-
ent to the reet-tweet and as a
result the campus wolves are try-
ing more subtle methods of ap-
proach. One coed explained the
phenomena as a result of preoc-
cupation of the men with other
matters."
Only one girl contacted admit-
ted that she would respond to a
whistle--and strangely enough,
she was the prettiest interviewed.

___
C
M
4
S
t

Ltte s A
s A
ReFAf . u
oming "DESIRE

Today and Saturday
25c till 5 P.M.
Alexander Korda
presents
The
THIEF OF
BAGDAD
in Magic Technicolor!
with SABU
JUNE DUPREZ
AE" Greer Garson

4

JAYCEES COOPERATE:
International Relations Week

c

;M

SUNDAY! "HER HUSBAND'S AFFAIRS"

Lucille Ball

MCHGAN "Pying Through
Saturday

Now Being Pli
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the last
in a series of descriptive articles con-
cerning the Student Legislature com-
mittee system).
By NAOMI STERN
Activities and aims of National
Student Association are carried
out locally through the NSA com-
mittee of the Student Legislature,
with projects ranging from Inter-
national Relations Week to con-
crete action on the campus dis-
crimination problem.
The committee, composed of
Legislature members and the NSA
delegates elected by the campus
at large, is working with the In-
ternational Students Association
and the Ann Arbor Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce on plans for In-
ternational Relations Week, April
16-23, which will include a cul-
tural program, open houses and a
Mock UN Assembly.
Discrimination Probes
The NSA sub-committee on dis-
crimination recently reorganized
as a coordinating group, reports
that intense discrimination in-
vestigations are being conducted
by campus organizations and that
they show that racial discrimina-
tion on campus is actually "being
slowly and methodica~ly elimi-
nated."

musical agenda include a state-
Other projects now underway wide tour by the University Con-
include the preparation of a sur- cert Band with 10 scheduled ap-
vey on the cultural, social and pearances.

i
E

employment opportunities at the'
University to be distributed to in-
coming freshmen.
The committee is cooperating
with world student relief groups
and is' sponsoring correspondence
between American and foreign
students.
Students Plan
Video Scripts
Six students in Garnet R. Gar-
rison's radio writing class have
been picked to write televisioni
14.
script for video shows to be pro-
duced by the speech department's
radio division this May.
They are Traverse DuVall, Rob-
ert Hauke, Pat Merritt, Vance Si-
monds, Norman Rappaport, and
Josh Greenfeld.
Garrison arranged for the tele-
cast and will produce the shows.
Hugh Norton and T. C. Battin,
both of the speech department,
will each produce a show.

Faculty Recitals

+ Classified Advertising +

inned by NSA

A faculty recital of sonatas for
cello and piano will be presented
at 8:30 p.m., April 12 in the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall. Oliver Edel,
cellist and Marian Owen, pianist
will participate.
The Massed Orchestra, com-
posed of 190 players representing
20 Michigan civic and community
orchestras will present a varied
program including Mendelssohn's
"Italian Symphony" "Star-Dust"
by Carmichael-Gould and Coates'
"London Every Day" suite.
The performance at 4:15 p.m.
Sunday in Hill Auditorium will
follow only one massed rehearsal,
although the participants have
practiced the selections in their
local groups, throughout the year.
To Be Broadcast
The program, jointly-sponsored
by the music school and the Mich-
igan Civic Orchestra Association,
will be broadcast over WPAG and
the Michigan network. The con-
cert is open to the public.
The Solo and Small Ensemble
Festival sponsored by the Mich-
igan School Vocal Association
which will take dace here Satur-
day will bring high school stu-
dents from all over the state. The
performances will be judged by
authorities in the various fields.
Campus lNews I
Three hundred people are need-
ed to sell tickets before and dur-
ing Michigras, according to Ann
McGrew, ticket chairman.
Those interested may contact
her at 2-4561.
* **
The Wired Radio Association
will hold acting and announc-
ing auditions at 7:30 p.m., Mon-
day, April 12, in the Broadcast-
ing Service studios on the fourth
floor of Angell Mall.
An open house at the local Ar-
mory and a War Souvenir con-
test will highlight Ann Arbor's
celebration of the nation's 20th
Army Day next Tuesday.
SPECIAL!
CLOSE-OUT
STUDENT DESK LAMPS
$2.25
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 S. Fourth Street
f "
"H omeS of 3-H our

Case Analysis
One be-moustached gentleman
analyzed the case against the
whistler with four reasons in de-
scending order of importance. "1.
The war fever is passing. 2. More
male students are married. 3. The
post-war campus replaces the
battlefield. 4. Men are older."
Another student looked up from
a booth where he sat with three
coeds and said, "Why whistle?"
His companions agreed that now
they wouldn't pay any attention,
but with a wartime manpower
shortage, they might.
"There's lots of whistling go-
Civil Service
Positions Open
Graduate engineers and physi-
cists who have from one to four
years professional experience can
apply for Civil Service positions
in Washington, D.C., Virginia and
Maryland, according to a U.S..
Civil Service announcement. 1
Jobs which pay from $3,397 to l
$5,905 a year are open in aero-
nautical, architectural, construe-
tion, electrical, mechanical and
structural engineering.

?a~"?::

'+'' .{;.n- ":;' ;., ,..;^ .:"_ _ vas a..;VN~f;:;"';;?.. r "r'.; j ": ,,r^:+ 4 ? : k:5:.. .. -.

Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.

P5 Ao( ;j0114' JOP

Weekdays
35c to 5 P.M.

NOW Thru Saturday
LARRY PARKS - ELLEN DREW
in
:.:

George Macready " Edgar Buchanan

I

a

BEER
} DEPOT
1 14 EAST WILLIAM CALL 7191
BEER
WINE - CHAMPAGNE - MIXERS
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE

SEE
MICHIGRAS
STORY IN TODAY'S
DAILY

MARCH OF TIME
"Marriage and Divorce"

11

Also
CARTOON
NEWS

1

I

Coming Sunday!

"PIRATES OF MONTEREY"

I

1,

FOR RENT
WHAT MALE student wants to take my
place in excellent two-room suite?
Best location in town. 407 E. Liberty.
Phone 2-0720.
HELP WANTED
CAMP COUNSELOR for boy's camp.
Single man of mature judgment in-
terested in working with boys this
summer. Experience in Riflery, arch-
ery, fishing or sailing preferred. Call
259285. )2
WANTED-Husky young man for out-
door work. Phone 23844. )41

TRANSPORTATION

THREE UNMARRIED MEDS desire
round trip ride to Florida. Call Jake
Detar, 23179, evenings. )26
FOR SALE
PARRAKEETS make delightful inex-
pensive pets. $4 and $6 each. Bird
supplies. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. Ph.
5330. )9
FOR SALE-'35 Harley-Davidson "74,"!
side-valve. New tires, brakes, genera-
tor, battery. All other parts in A-1
shape, $295. Get all set for Spring
Vacation. Call 2-6824, ask for Hopps.
BUSINESS SERVICES
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
liemy home. Free pickup and de-
livery. Phone 25-7708. )41

WE WILL BE
vttheN
during vaaion -
Serving lunch, in-between snacks, and dinners. It is eco-
nomical tocat at the Den! - Here are a few ideas:

AI

PERSONAL

INSURANCE POLICY
on all dates . . . corsage from
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Call 2-7032 between 8-12 P.M. )45
VACATION-I hope you all
Have an enjoyable one.
NORM STEERE )44
WANTED TO RENT
EXECUTIVE, wife and 8 year old
daughter need 5-6 room modern un-
furnished house by May 15. Must be
on campus or walking distance to
University elementary school and
have nice yard. Permanent residents.
Best references. Tel. 2-0388. )35
PLEASE help us find a place to live; we
can't get married till we do. Young

TYPING:
dresses.
letters,
ice, 208

Theses, term papers, ad-
Duplicating: notices, form
programs. A2 Typing Serv-
Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28

I

Deluxe
HAMBURGER
with plenty of
French Fries
on iy 4UC

FRANKS
with plenty of
French Fries
only 35c

STEAK
SANDWICH
plenty of
French Fries
only5

4.

THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ations a specialty with prompt serv-
ice. Custom clothes and re-styling.
Hildegarde Shop, 109 East _Washing-
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )87
LOST AND FOUND

SANDWICHES

DINNERS
Chops $1 00
T-Bone Steak . 1.00
Porterhouse Steak......1.25
e- . 1 'C

I

MIX-UP in raincoats at League last
Friday. Call University Ext. 547 or
9rt. L mauedesk }3

Cheese
Egg Salad
. . , , .

20c
20c
in

I

i

I

1

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