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February 26, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, FEBRUAR~Y 26, 1948~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SHOT IN THE ARM:
Students Get Drug Habit
MoreEasily Than Others

By FRAN IVICK
Are college students more likely
to become drug addicts than the
average person?
They are, in the opinion of a
local pharmacist, who for year,,
has watched University students
buying pain-killers and insomnia
cures, filling in their daily 4 and
10 o'clock slumps with coffee,
coke and candy bars.
Drugs Bought
"Students buy drugs from me
to keep awake, put them to sleep,
and ease their pains," the drug-
gist said. "They start by just tak-
ing the drugs in an emergency,
and finish by depending on the
medicines."
He further said that many stu-
Toledo Ed1tor
Hits American-
Discrimination
(Continued from Page 1)
supported its value as a weapon
for the United Nations.
"Isolation is resurging, but we
can't go home again," he insisted.
"It is our responsibility to main-
tain peace. We went home once
and left the League of Nations.
We were soon in World War II."
"A world we can fly aiound in
three days and talk around in 30
seconds is not one we can with-
draw from."
Praising Gen. MacArthur and
Gen. Wedemeyer for what he
termed their "idealism which is
realistic," he cited their mutual
insistence that the world is be-
coming one.
In the final analysis however,
Patterson pointed out, the use of
the imagination to recognize our
own responsibility both as indi-
viduals and groups will be the
saving factor.
"Public opinion is the thing
that defeats candidates. So long
as 73 per cent of the people as
shown in a Gallup Poll, expect
war in 25 years, we will be in
war in 25 years."

dents take 'anti-pain medicines at
a certain time each day to get
imaginary relief from imaginary
pains.
"Why, there's one fellow that
comes into the store every single
morning, and buys a bromo," the
store-owner said. He added other
people have the same habit in
regard to the less harmful candy
bars and cola beverages.
Habit Forming
"Any cure or stimulant with
phenacetine or caffeine in it can
become an addiction with the
user," the druggist said. "And de-
spite all the propaganda against
the practice; students are not wor-
ried when they try to get what-
ever mild form of a drug they
are permitt'ed under the present
laws."
As to the reason for students
being so dependent on pain-kill-
ers, sleeping medicine, and stim-
ulants, the pharmacist said,
"They're a lot more highstrung
than other people, and they have
to be doing something every min-
ute, even if it becomes habit-
forming."
Elections Held in
Hayden, Winchell
In a recent election held in
Hayden House, East Quadrangle,
officers chosen were Jack Kruse,
president; Al Lawson, vice-pres-
ident; Erving Gallatin, secretary-
treasurer; Roger Pollard, social
chairman; and Lee Sunshine,
scholarship chairman.
Elections were held yesterday
in Winchell House, West Quad,
with the following results: Pres-
ident, Dick Stafford; vice-pres-
ident, Russ Etzell; secretary, Phil
McCallister ; treasurer, John
Breckenridge; social chairman,
Tony Palermo; athletic chairman,
Ed Carrington; academic chair-
man,' Berry D'higgers.

WALLACE BEFORE COMMITTEE-Henry A. Wallace (extreme
right), third party candidate for President, testifies in Washing-
ton before the House Foreign Affairs Committee. Sen. Glen Tay-
lor, Wallace's recently announced running mate, sits second from
left at the committee table.
COME AND GET IT!
Lost and Found Department
CouldStart Thriving Concern

Shartel Finds
Growing Need
For Regulation
Fells, of Laws Made
By Judicial Decision
By ART FRIEDMAN
Our real problem today is rec-
onciling the amount of socialism
we need with our democratic ideas,
Prof. Burke Shartel said yesterday
in the third Cooley law lecture.
More and more regulation is
part of the socialistic trend, and'
thus the law-making job becomes
bigger and bigger. It is impossi-
ble for the legislature to do more
than lay out general lines, he de-
clared. The administrative agen-'
cies must fill in the details, he
added.
Judicial Legislation
Prof. Shartei also objected to
the fact that too often the courts
deny that they legislate. When
there is no statute or law that can
be applied to a case, the court
must decide the case itself. This is
done either on the basis of prece-
dent or by applying borrowed laws
-those enacted in other states or
nations. Precedent is the falling
back on previous judicial decision,
which itself was not based on any
legislation, as a basis for deciding
the case. This, Prof. Shartel main-
tained is legislation.
The idea that the court doesn't
really create legislation, but dis-
covers a law that was really there
all the time was called a "pious
fiction" by Prof. Shartel. He de-
clared that this is done only to
disguise the fact that the proc-
ess does not strictly adhere to the
separation of power principle.
Up-to-Date Law
Prof. Shartel also suggested that
law-making bodies should have
advisory boards, thus solving the
problem of legislative inertia..
These boards would make pro-
posals to the legislature in order to
keep the law in proper shape, he
said.
Prof. Shartel's lecture at 4:15
p.m. today in Rm. 150, Hutchins
Hall will deal with "The Structure
and Statement of Standards."
Hillel Snack Bar
The Cornedbeef Corner of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation will
be open from 10:30 p.m. to mid-
night Saturday. All students are
invited to use this sandwich and
beverage service.

GUILD
NEWS
The Westminster Presbyterian
Guild will inaugurate a weekly
coffee hour at 3:30 p.m. today
in the church's Vance Parlor to
better acquaint Presbyterian stu-
dents with their classmates. The
guild officers will be present to
welcome all interested students.
Inter-Guild- will hold a short
worship and meditation set'vice at
7:30 a.m. today in the League
chapel. The service will be held
each Thursday at the same time
during the seiaester.
Foreign students of the Angli-
can faith will be the guests of
the Canterbury Club at a tea
from 4 to 6 p.m. tomorrow at the
Episcopal Church.
Sorority Rushing
Invitations to final desserts, last
set of sorority rushing parties, will
be distributed from noon to 1 p.m.
today in the Panhellenic Office
of the League.

An Engineering Research Insti-
tute has been established at the
University of Michig-an by action
of the Board of Regents, Provost
James P. Adams announced yes-
terday.
The Institute, which will be un-
der the direction of a committee
from both the Engineering and
Literary Colleges, will replace the
Department of Engineering Re-
search, Provost Adams said.
The action was called a modifi-

All students interested in work-
ing on the Committee of Patrons
for Michigras should sign up this
week in the Undergraduate Office
of the League.'
Workers are also needed on the
Committee on Prizes for Michi-
gras. Those interested should call
Francie Carpenter at 2-3225 or
Jim Kistler at 2-7595.

ADAMS ANNOUNCES:

UNITED WORLD
FEDERALISTS
Presents

Ya& " 6'

By LEE KALTENBACH
Pajamas, hosiery, lingerie,
scarfs, etc., may sound like the
call of the elevator operator in
Macy's-but in this case it's just
a few of the many items turned
in at the University lost and
found department.
One of the important services
rendered by the business office
is the widely used lost and found
department, located in Rm. 1,
University Hall. Each day thirty
or forty people, "losers" or "find-
ers," benefit from this service.
Unclaimed Articles
When articles turned into the
office contain the owner's name,
the person is notified at once and
can come to claim his property.

If, however, the article contains
nothing which identifies it, which
is often the case, the stray article
is kept until somebody comes. to
identify and claim it.
The many articles which are
not claimed after two months are
given to the social service at the
University Hospital which dis-
tributes them to needy families.
Wide Variety
The articles most responsible
for sardine-like closets and over-
flowing drawers in the lost and
found office include gloves, mit-
tens, glasses, coats. pens, books
and hats, both men's and women's.
Last fall it became a fad to
lose coats. During that particular
time the closets containing "found
coats" fairly bulged.

LELAND
STOWE
Author - Traveler
Commentator in a lecture on
"AN ANALYSIS
OF WORLD GOVERNMENT"
HILL AUDITORIUM
Sunday-Feb. 29-8:00 p.m.
Tickets on sale in U Hall
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily
$1 - .75 - .50
Proceeds from lecture to go
to U.N. Famine Drive

I d

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Pledge pins and buttons, in stock
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national regulations permit.
Recognition buttons, ',mono-
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notes attractively designed and
delivered in a rush.
-Tom and Meredith Suckling
1319 S. University Phone 9$33
"YOUR J3ALFOUR 'STORE"

(Continued from Page 4)
Kuethe of the Aeronautics De-
partment will speak on "Turbu-
lence."
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri.,
Feb. 27, 4 p.m., Observatory. Orren
C. Mohler will speak on the sub-
ject, "Modern Computing Ma-
chines."
Seminar in Differential Opera-
tors: will meet Thurs., Feb. 26, (in-
stead of Friday', 3 p.m., Rm. 3010,
Angell Hall.
Geology 11: Make-up final ex-
amination will be given .Sat., Feb.
28, 9 a.m., Rm. 3056, Natural Sci-
ence Bldg.
Orientation S-eminar: Thurs.,
Feb. 26, 1 p.m., Rm. 3001, Angell
Hall. Mr. Nemerever will continue
his discussion of Kron's Theory of
Subspaces.
Physics 25, Final Examination
Make-up: Rm. 202, W. Physics
Bldg., Tues., March 2, 2-5 p.m.

Concerts
Student Recital: Elizabeth Lew-
is, violinist, will be heard in a
recital at 8:30 p.m., Fri., Feb. 27,
Rackham Assembly Hall. Given in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Master of
Music, Miss Lewis will play Sonata
in D major by Vivaldi, Poeme, Op.
25 by Chausson, Sonata in B-flat
Major, K. 454 by Mozart, and
Rose Lee Finney's Fiddle-Doodle-
Ad. Miss Lewis is a pupil of Gil-
bert Ross. The public is invited.
Events Today
Michigan Chapter AAUP: Presi-
dent William W. Whitehouse of
Albion College will speak on "The
Place of the Small College in the
American Educational Pattern" at
4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphithea-
tre. The public is invited. Mem-
bers and their guests will lunch
informally with President White-
house at 6 p.m., Faculty Club din-
ing room, Michigan Union.
Graduate School Record con-
cert: .7:45. p.m.,. East. Lounge,
Rackham Bldg.
Mozart: Quartet No. 15 in D.
Minor, K. 421; Budapest Quartet.
Franck; Variations Symphoni-
ques for Piano and Orchestra;
Gieseking, London Philharmonic
Orchestra, Wood, conductor. Co-
relli; Concerto Grosso in G Minor,
Op. 6, No 8; London Symphony
Or'chestra, Wa lter, conductor.
Beethoven; Sonata No. 21 in C
Major (Waldstein), Op. 53; Giese-
king. All graduate students are in-
vited; silence is requested.
''Jwfta Sigma Phi: 3-5 p.m,.
Haven Hall.
Alpha Phi Omega: Open meet-
ing, 7 p.m., Michigan Union.
Movie.. Men desiring to be rushed
are invited.
Modern Poetry Club: 8 p.m.,
Russian tearoom, Michigan

League. Mr. Pierce will lead the
discussion of W. B. Yeats.
International Center weekly tea:
4:30-5:30 p.m. Hostesses: Mrs. C.
A. Sink and Miss Yona Yoshpe.
Art Cinema League will present
THE GREAT GLINKA, Russian
dialogue, English titles. The per-
formances will be shown on Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday, 8:30
p.m., Lydia Meidelssohn Theatre.
Tickets available at box office
daily beginning 2 p.m. Wednesday.
United World Federalist Study
Group: 7:30 p.m., Michigan Un-
ion. Topic for discussion: "The
Role of Law."
Kappa Phi: 5:30 p.m., Wesleyan
Guild Lounge, Methodist Church.
Interfaith Committee of the
Hillel Foundation: 4:30 p.m. at the
Foundation. Plan program for se-
mester.
Michigan Dames Interior Deco-
rating Group to be guests of the
Interior Decorating Group of the
Faculty Women's Club, 8 p.m.,
Michigan League.
Michigan Dames Dranma Group
meets 8 p.m., at the home of Mrs.
G. V. Lane, 426 Thompson.
(Continued on Page 6)

At MICHIGAN
MARY
NICHOLS
smokes
CH ESTERF I ELDS

Mary says:
"I have always
Chesterfie'lds zildner
throat, important to
smoker."

APPLICATION
PHOTOS
--- While You Wait -
SNIDER STUDIO
109'/2 East Washington

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'M.. -:Get Here Early! ~/

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