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February 26, 1948 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY,

,FEBRUARY 26, 1948

MAN T HE MAINSAIL!
'Boats Don't Get Stuck ill
Basements' Builder Says

By BOB BYERLY
Too many .people worry about
boats getting stuck in basements,
according to Dave Brown, Ann Ar-
bor boat builder.
"Every time somebody sees my
workshop," he says, "they ask me
if I can get the boat out all right."
In eight years of building sail-
boats, the last year on contract
to sell, Brown hasn't made one too
big for the doorway yet.
Builds Dinghies.
Dave builds fourteen-foot sail-
ing dinghies. Since the beginning
Builders Cite
Local Space
Linitations
(Continued from Page 1)
tomer to put up a prefab in its en-
tirety by himself, subject to in-
spection. Total cost: $3,800, plus
$175 for the lot.
Lumber, which has jumped in
cost 300% to 400% since 1941, is
yrimarily responsible for the high
cost of today's house, the buildersI
agree.
Cost of Labor
The cost of labor, coupled with
a slight decline in productivity,
adcounts for another share of the
cost.
In an effort to cut the cost of a
house, several Ann Arbor builders
are adopting the so-called "modu-
lar unit plan" of building. Under
this system, four inches is selected
as a base for all building mate-
rials. Larger panels and long
beams are all in multiples of four.
As in the automobile industry,
such standardization would make
it no longer necessary for builders
to stock a variety of different
sizes. And additions to homes
could be made more readily.
Investijent Diseouraged
It has also been pointed out that
the investment market is discour-
aging lo-income builders. Rather
than issue a loan with a four per
cent return, despite the fact that
it is insured up to 90% by the
FHA, investment companies are
currently turning to more lucra-
tive enterprises.
On the lighter side, a scarcity of
trained laborers in Ann Arbor-
especially carpenters and brick-
layers-is expected to ease after
completion of the huge University
-projects. $
The three University buildings
now under construction will cost
an estimated $1,145,000, as com-
pared to the cost of home units in
Ann Arbor last year-$1,716,115.

of last sunner, when the D. M.
Brown Boat Company was found-
ed. he has built four, all of them
sold, and plans to finish one more
before he enters North western's
engineering school in March.
All five of the boats, which do
not come inside bottles, are known
as Rhodes Bantams, recently de-
signed by P. L. Rhodes, well-
known naval architect. They are
14 feet long, 51/ feet across and
carry 120 square feet of sail area.
'One-design Class'
"It's a 'one-design class' boat,"
Dave says, "made according to
strict specifications with the lee-
way of only one or two minute
optional parts."
He builds carefully, using the
best materials he can get, and the
finished product is a paragon of
craftsmanship. Some materials
are, of course, hard to find, but
he has so far kept production go-
ing smoothly.
Uses Elbow Grease
Besides elbow grease, Dave has
a nice assortment of saws, chisels,
bits and a home-madedrill that
will bore two sizes of holes alter-
nately.
Dave, who is no relation to Gar
Wood, starts out on a boat by
building the frtmes,nor crosswise
structure, which he sets up on a
keel form. Then he sets the keel
and lays the stringers, or length-
wise framework.
From Skeleton Forward
Blueprints handy, he planes
this skeleton down to get ready
for the planking. Four long pieces
of white oak, kept watertight by
a special marine glue, make up
the bottom and side walls. When
this is done, the embryo comes off
the keel form, is then fitted and
supplied with ready-made sails.
When Dave was a freshman in
high school, the started building
a nineteen-footer with a cabin.
He finished it, with the help of
nearly everybody in the neighbor-
hood, in time to sail it two days
before going into the Navy. From
the start the big problem in the
construction of this boat, he says,
was to keep the rest of the family
from working on it. He added that
a couple of frivolous features got
in anyway.
Foreign Fiancees
WASHINGTON, Feb. 25-(I)-
A House bill to admit alien sweet-
hearts of GI's into the United.
States was approved today by the
Senate Judiciary Committee.
The measure would permit fi-'
ancees of members of the armed
forces to enter this country for at
least three months through 1948.
If they married during the three
months, they could stay.

U Furnishes
Slpringbfoal 4to
Public Service
Institute Offers Broad
Fieldl for Graduates
The University Institute of 3ub-
lie Administration, an unheraided
unit virtually unknown to most
students, is the springboard for
men and women looking toward
careers in public adryinistratic.
The Institute, which is on a
graduate school level, embodies a
broad program. Courses are offer-
I ed in architecture and design, busi-
ness administration, economics,
engineering, law, political science,
psydhology and sociology.
Many Career Opportunities
As a result of the vast expansion
of functions performed by all lev-
els of government, career oppor-
tunities in public administration
are numerous.
Employment in this field isn't
restricted to government work in-
as much as private governmental
research bureaus and quasi-pub-
lie agencies absorb people train-
ed in governmental administration
and finance.
For many years graduates of
the University entered public serv-
ice because their field of special-
ization was among those inevitab-
ly utilized by government, or by
entering a government training
program.
Then, in 1914, a special curricu-
lum was organized to train stu-
dents for administrative service.
The same year saw the establish-
ment of the . Bureau of Govern-
ment in Haven Hall. Now the re-
search and service unit of the In-
stitute of Public Administration,
the Bureau of Government in-
cludes an extensive library of gov-
ernment and related publications.
Institute Created in 1937
in 1937 the Institute of Public
and Social Administration was
created to provide training in the
two related fields. In 1945 this
Institute was reorganized and two
independent units were establish-
ed.
Under the existing program stu-
dents in the institute benefit from
close association with public of-
ficials throughout the State. In
providing, technical assistance,
particularly of a research nature,
on problems of local and state
government, the Institute affords
the student opportunity for filed
work and laboratory experience.
Woman, 123 Years Old(,
Dies at Houghton
HOUGHTON, Mich., Feb. 25-
(P)--Mrs. Mamie Nelson, who
claimed to be 123 years old, died
today in Houghton County in-
firmary.
The aged woman, a patient at
the infirmary for the past year
and a half, said she was born in
Ireland on Feb. 3, 1825.
For many years she had been
blind and ailing, but alert men-
tally. Mrs. Nelson said she came
to this country when only three
weeks old-during the second ad-
ministration of President James
Monroe.
Her husband, Carl Ferdinand
Nelson, died in Hancock in 1925.

BIOGRAPHY OF RUSSIAN COMPOSER-Valentina Serova and
Boris Chirkov, who portray the composer Mikhail Glinka and his
wife, in a scene from "The Great Glinka." The film is being
presented tonight, tomorrow and Saturday in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, under the sponsorship of the Art Cinema
League.
* * * *
'GREAT GLINKA':
Art Cinema To Present Film
Of .Russian Composer'sLife
e

S elolfirships
(i To 33
'Walter List s Winners
Of Hoiber Awards
tIhirty-three Bomber Scholar-
ship awards of $100 each were an-
nounced yesterday by Dean Erich
A. Walter, chairman of the Gen-
eral Un dergram itae Scholarship
Committee.
In the literary college the win-
ners were William Beppler, Rich-
ard Dabek, John Dunn, Stephen
Evanoff, Glen Garman, William
Juskowitz, Roy Landers, George
Love, George Maskeny, Robert
Miller, Daniel O'Halloran, Lloyd
Partridge, Victor Schneider.
Vance Simonds. James Sullivan,
George Vetter, Claude Ware, Ger-
ald Wetzel, and George Zucker-
man.
The four students in the engi-
neering college who received
awards were Paul Greenwood,
Robert Harrison, George Johnson,
and Roy Levin. There ' were also
four winners in forestry school,
including Osal Capps, Philip Col-
lins, Carl Newport, and George
Tourtillot.
The remaining awards were
given to Merton Burkholder and
John Fisher of BusAd. school,
Norman Miller and John Vyn of
the School of Education, George
Mocre of music school, and Steph-
en Krenytzky of the architectural
college.-
orldd's (reyttest
Rose IBowlI toverage
E ia. '

Albion Preside t To Tecture
On mRole of the Smal IICollege'
President William W. White- lege in the American Educational
house of Albion College, noted Pattern" at 4:15 p.m. today in
educator and lecturer, will speak the Rackham Amphitheatre.
on "The Place of the Small Col- Before ass-uming office at Al-
bion on Spt. 1, 1945, President
Whitehouse was dean of the Lib-
eral Arts College of Wayne Uni-
versity in Detroit for a period of
six years.
Besides an LL.D. from Wayne
University, Dr. Whitehouse holds
the Th.D. from Drew University
and the Ph.D. from Northwestern
University. He is Chairman of the
Commission on Teacher Educa-
Colleges, and a members of the
~. ~NCommission of Higher Education
\ Ce t Ah
of the North Central Association
of Colleges.
As a lecture, Dr. Whitehouse
has spoken at the University of
Chicago, Northwestern and be-
fore the American Sociological So-
c'iety.
His lecture today is sponsored
by the campus chapter of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors and is open to the
general public.

1

A

"The Great Glinka," Soviet film
biography of the famous 19th cen-
tury Russian composer, will be
shown at 8:30 p.m. today, tomor-
row and Saturdayrat the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
"The Great Glinka" is a true
picture of the composer's life from
birth to the completion of his
greatest opera, "Ruslan and Lud-
mila."
The film recreates Mikhail
Glinka's childhood, his student
days at St. Petersburg, his debut
into the brilliant artistic society
Library Offers
Bible Exhibit
Show Old Editions 1i
World's 'Best-seller'
The world's best seller, the Bible
-in many of its various forms as
it has come to us through the
ages-is now on display in the
first floor exhibit cases of the
General Library.
Most recent edition displayed
is Prof. Leroy Waterman's modern
translation and interpretation of
the Old Testament Song of Solo-
mon, T1he Song of Songs.
In contrast to this modern edi-
tion are displayed ancient Ital-
ian, German, Spanish and poly-
glot Bibles and psalters.
There are in the cases 12th and
13th century Greek manuscripts
of the Psalms, Acts and 'Epistles;
a leaf of the third century codex
of the Epistles of Paul, earliest
manuscript of the Greek Bible in
existence; several Hebrew 'bibli-
cal scrolls; a 1704 edition of the
Martin Luther translation; an
1838 reprint of the Coverdale
Bible, 1535, first English Bible to
appear in print; and a first edi-
tion of the King James version,
printed in 1611.
Many of the Bibles are included
in the William Tinker Hollands
Memoril collection, contributed
by Wiliiam C. Hollands, former
superintendent of the University
bindery, who himself bound sev-
eral of the volumes.

of the period, his close relation-
ship with the poet, Pushkin, his
unfortunate marriage, and his
work in composing and producing
his first opera, "Ivan Susanin."
The title role of "The Great
Glinka" is played by Boris Chir-
kov, three times Stalin Prize win-
ner and star of the "Maxim" tri-
logy and "Chapayev."
The role of Pushkin is played
by Peter Aleynikov, and that of
Glinka as a child by Sasha Sobo-
lev, an eleven-year-old music stu-
dent at the Moscow School of
Music.
Also featured in the film is
Vladimir Druzhnikov, star of
"Stone Flower," whose perform-
ances have won him rave notices
here as well as in the .Soviet: IUn-
ion.
Acclaimed by the Soviet public
and press as one of the outstand-
ing -contributions to the Soviet
screen, "The Great Glinka" is
being shown here, with English
titles, by the Art Cinema League.
Cam pus Colds
Show .Decline
The severity of winter weather
this year apparently has had no
affect on the prevalence of upper
respiratory infections, according
to Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, Direc-
tor of Health Service.
"In fact, University students
seem to have had little trouble
with the common cold so far," he
stated, "and if the rate continues
to be as low as it has been
throughout the rest of the season,
w' will be very pleased."
However germs and virus are
very unpredictable, and there is
always the possibility of a sudden
epidemic of colds or influenza, he
declared.

WILLIAM W. WHITEHOUSE
. . . speaks here today
Health Service Surgeon
To Undergo Operation
Dr. A. William Coxon, Univer-
sity Health Service surgeon, has
entered the University Hospital to
undergo a rntajor operation Friday.
Dr. Coxon was recently given the
Civic Service Award by Eagles
Lodge for general civic interest in
youth groups and atheltics.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Cont ii ed from Page 5)
Corning Events
Geology and Mineralogy Jour-
nal Club: Fri., Feb. 27, 12 noon,
Rm. 3055, Natural Science Bldg.
Dr. George T. Woolard, of
Princton University will speak on
the subject, "The Application of
Geophysics to the Geological
Study of the Continent," (black
and white slides). All interested
are cordially welcome.
Delta Epsilon Pi fraternity: Sun.,
Feb: 29, 4 p.m., Rm. 302, Michigan
Union. Discussion of constitution
and annual spring dance. Any
male student who is of Helenic
rescent or is phil-Hellene is in-
vited.
German Coffee Hour: Fri., Feb.
27, 3-4:30 p.m., Coke Bar, Michi-
gan League. Students and faculty
members invited.
Inter-cooperative Council Edu-
cational meeting Fri., Feb. 27,

8:15 p.m., Robert Owen House.j
Professors Gault and Dickinson
will speak on 'Cooperatives and
Private Enterprise." Refreshments.
Public invited.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation:
Friday Evening Services, 7:45 p.m.
Student panel discussion on Uni-
versal Military Training. All stu-
dents invited. Social hour.
Instruction in American Ball-
room Dancing: Classes, Fri., Feb.
27, 8 p.m., International Center.
Record dancing follows.

Hold Those Bonds !
At MICHIGAN
JACK
BENTLEY
smokes
CHESTERF I ELDS
Jack says:
"Ches/erficld is my favor-
ite cigare/te--you can las/c
the difference."
A nation-wide survey shows
that Chesterfields are TOPS
with College Students from
coast-to-coast.
-
PINT'ING
for
Posters - Handbills
Programs - Tickets
done at
RAMSAY-CANFIELD
119 East Liberty
(Across from P-Bell)
Phone 7900
C U

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Odorless Dry Cleaning"
CLEAN ERS
630 South Ashley
Phone 4700

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Your chance to go thru
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on the front steps
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Jumpin' at the Woodside
Settin'. the Pace
Wild Leo
Mad Lad
Buzzy
Meeskite
Fat Girl
Robbins' Nest

Illinois Jacquet
Leo Parker and Dexter Gordon
Leo Parker
Sir Charles Thompson's All Stars
Charlie Parker
Allen Eager
Leo Parker and Fats Navarro
Illinois Jacquet

RE-ISSUE SINGLES

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Take the A Train
Little Jazz
Jersey Bounce
Opus No. 1
Just Kiddin' Around
Second Balcony Jump
Buckin' the Dice
Boogie Woogie
on the St. Louis Blues
Rhapsody in Blue
King Porter Stomp
Jazznocracy
Look Out

Duke Ellington
Artie Shaw
Earl Hines
Tommy Dorsey
Artie Shaw
Earl Hines
Fats Waller
Earl Hines,I
Glenn Miller
Jimmie Lunceford
Metronome All Stars

ORGANIZATIONS
SENIOR PICTURES

HOUSE GROUPS
SPORTS

POPULAR SINGLES

SATIRE SECTION

ITNI ON

I'm Looking Over
a Four oef Clover
Now Is theHour
Little White Lies
But Beautiful
I Love You, Yes I Do -
Teresa

Frankie Lane
Bing Crosby
Dick Haymes
Lane and Sinatra
Dinah Washington
Vic Damone

I

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