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October 05, 1946 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-05

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40

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1946

THE MTCTtCA ND A TT V

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Petitions for Assembly Posts
Due at Noon Saturday, Oct. 12

Social Committee,
League House Dance
Positions Available
Petitions for several Assembly posi-
tions are due at noon Saturday, Oct.
12, in the Undergraduate Office of
the League, it was announced by
Jeanne Clare, president of Assembly
Association.
All eligible residents of league
houses may apply for the following
posts on the central committee for
League House Dances, which are held
on Saturday afternoons in the
League Ballroom: general chairman;
assistant chairman, which includes
control of tickets and finance; pub-
licity; decorations; and entertain-

Club To Begin
Hockey Practice
The WAA Hockey Club will begin
regular meetings at 4:30 p.m. Tues-
day on Palmer Field.
The group, which is open to both
beginners and advanced players, will
meet every Tuesday and Thursday as
long as weather permits. Instruc-
tion will be offered, and Miss Ander-
son, faculty sponsor of the club, will
be on hand for coaching at all times,
The first meetings of Hockey Club
will be devoted to drill in technique
and to practice games; later in the
season tournament play within the
club will be organized. Special games
with University High School and
with nearby colleges are to be ar-
ranged.
All women on campus interested
in playing hockey who were unable
to attend the organization meeting
this week are urged to call Barbara
McNeill, manager, at 2-4471. Those
planning to play on Tuesday are
asked to check out equipment in the
WAB just before practice.
With twenty-six members already
registered, the club's membership is
still growing. Miss McNeill states,
"All women on campus, regardless of
class or experience, are eligible for
the Hockey Club. We'd like to see
them out for hockey this year. Those
women who have had exeperience in
coaching or officiating hockey are
especially urged to join the club's ac-
tivities."
Shortage of Food
Slims Coed Form
by CAROL LIEBERMAN
According to most reliable sources,
trim hips and slender waistlines will
be the keynotes of the Michigan
coeds' figures this semester.
This is not on ultimatum deliever
by Ann Arbor corsetieres, but an un-
avoidable conclusion we are forced
to draw from reports of University
dieticians.
Even pre-war scarcities, such as
butter, which are now available to
the public, are so expensive that
purchase problems still exist. Res-
taurants, league houses, and sorori-
ties, are faced with equal difficulties,
and all have resorted to concocting
ingenious substitutes in cheese souf-
fles, vegetable, dinner, and fish
dishes.
Students could well echo Dickens'
cry from The Chimes, "Give us bet-
ter food when we're a-working for
our lives." But we fear that such la-
ments would go unheeded. Might im-
press your English prof, though.
Of course, we can always ration-
alize. With the trimming down of
feminine forms, crowded dorm condi-
tions may be somewhat alleviated.
Four slender women in a converted
quadruple room will be a good deal
more compatible than four hefty
misses.
Besides, Joyce Kilmer offers some
"food for thought" in his Apology,
with the theory that gastronomical
frustration sharpens the wit:
"For nothing keeps a poet
In his high singing mood
Like unappeasablehunger
For unattainable food."
We could even suggest that the na-
tional Treasury Department take
note of our fine . example, and try
cutting down on their figures.
Coeds May Practice
Swimming Events
In Union Pool Today
The Union Pool will be open from
9 a.m. to 11 a.m. today for those who
wish to practice for the WAA Swim-

ming Meet to be held Tuesday, Oct.
15.
Those women who intend to take
part in the swimming meet are urged
to take advantage of the opportunity
for practice today and next Saturday.
Events to be featured in the meet in-
clude 25 and 50-yard back stroke,
breast s~troke. and reefvtyle~raes. a

ment, which involves preparation of
programs, and arrangements for
hostesses.
Also included on the petitioning
list for independent coeds is the
post of Coke Bar chairman, who
will be in charge of concessions at
campus dances. Miss Clare par-
ticularly stressed the importance of
Coke Bar activities as one of the
chief sources of revenue to the
Association.
Other positions available to inde-
pendent women are chairman of teas,
who will cooperate with Panhellenic
Association in sponsoring faculty teas
and similar affairs throughout the
year; assistant chairman of the so-
cial committee, who will aid Sue
Smith, general chairman, in plan-
ning Assembly social affairs; and as-
sistant project chairman, who will
work with Phyllis Petit, general
chairman, on Tag Day plans, and
other project activities for the Fresh
Air Camp.
A more complete list of duties
which will be required for these
various positions, will be posted in
the League Undergraduate Office.
Petitions may be obtained in the
office of the Social Director, Miss
Ethel McCormick, and coeds should
sign for interviews at the time they
turn in petitions.
Interviewees will be required to
bring their eligibility cards, signed
by the Merit-Tutorial Committee,
and their Assembly membership
cards. The Merit-Tutorial Commit-
tee is located in the Undergraduate
Office, and Assembly membership
cards may be obtained from 3 to 5
p.m. Mondays "through Thursdays, in
the Assembly Office, Room D, on the
third floor of the League.
Miss Clare urges all interested in-
dependent women to take advantage
of this opportunity to take an active
part in the activities of their Asso-
ciation.

Soph Cabaret
Will Sponsor
Mass Meeting
There will be a meeting for all
sophomore women at 4:30 p.m., Wed-
nesday in the League Ballroom to
discuss plans for Soph Cabaret.
Polly Hanson, general chairman,
will explain the Cabaret as a whole.
Chairmen of the major committees
will speak on the type of work which
each committee does, and the number
of coeds needed to help. At the con-
clusion of the meeting women who
are interested in working on .one of
the committees may turn in cards
with their preferences.
Coeds Join Committees
These cards will be turned over to
the general chairman who will assign
the coeds to committees, following
preferences as closely as possible.
Women who petitioned last year for
committee chairmanships and are
still interested in working are espe-
cially urged to attend, according to
Pat Hannagan, publicity chairman.
Soph Cabaret has been presented
annually since 1927 except for two
years in 1942 and 1943. It is written,
acted, directed, and produced by
sophomore women, and financed by
their class dues. This year's proceeds
will go to the University Fresh Air;
Camp.
Traditionally, the Cabaret takes
over the entire second floor of the
League for one night of entertain-
ment each year. The Cabaret is not
strictly a date affair. The admission
price covers all of the events included
in the program.
An orchestra is featured in the
League Ballroom, and a floorshow
and movie are presented in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Refreshments
are served in the Grand Rapids
Room,, and a mixer is held in the
Hussey Room, with dancing to rec-
ords, bridge, and community singing.
The decorations carry out the cen-
tral theme which is chosen each year.

AP

'1

jR

R I D I R 0 N D A D D 1 E S® University of Connecticut football players introduce their babies
to Coach J. Orlean Christian at Hartford. Left to right: Albie Jorgensen, son of the college president
with 20-months-old Catherine Anne: Robert Starkel, West Hartford, Conn., and 5-months-old Deborah;
and Charles Molloy, Bridgeport, Conn., with Susan, a month old.

B E A U T Y -Merrill Towne,
a former Marine sergeant from
Boston, has been entered in a
beauty contest to be held in New
York by the American Veterans
Committee.

i-i0
By LOIS KELSO
THE SEVEN LABORS of Hercules were as northing compared to the labors
of the Michigan cheerleader. Look what those boys go through-they
shout themselves hoarse, do cartwheels, flips, and generally act pretty silly,
all in the hope of attracting the attention of a mob of people who are far
too much occupied in blowing soap bubbles, searching for friends or rela-
tions, explaining the game to the rest of the stadium, mentally composing
a scorching letter to The Daily about the poor student seats, or just quietly
passing out, to give them a glance.
For years now the boys have been trying to put over one of those
question and answer affairs that go over so well in high school-sort of
a Socratic dialogue, full of enthusiastic agreement on both sides. They
probably sat up nights putting this together. Despite all their efforts,
the cheer is still being received with thunderous apathy, as are most of
their efforts.
IN A LAST-DITCH attempt to drag some enthusiasm out of the student
body, the cheerleaders and the Student Legislature, still in there pitch-
ing, are sponsoring a YELL Contest. The winner will receive a free trip to
the Ohio State game and credit at campus bookstores.
For those who wish to be in good standing with Ann Arbor's Finest,
and for the cheerleaders themselves, I have a Helpful Thought.
PERHAPS the overwhelming lack of response in the past has been caused
by an overrating of the powers of Michigan students. They can speh
Michigan, M-I-C-H-I-G-A-N-Fight-team-fight, very nicely. In fact, they
have it down pat. But when confronted with anything more abstruse, they
become confused and relapse into abashed silence.
In future the yell-leaders might do well to consider the abilities of theft
audience, and I do mean audience. Maybe alphabet blocks would help.
Women Needed for Assembly Projects

,T H U N D E R J E T I N F L I C H T -- The Army's new P-84 jet fighter plane, the Republic
Thunderjet, roars through the clouds on a test flight. It has been timed unofficially at 619 miles per
hour, has a eing span of 36 feet, 5 inches and an overall length of 37 feet. In contrast to other
American jets, the P-84's air intake is in the nose instead of on the sides.

S T A R - Viveca Lindsfors ofI
'Sweden -plays on a beach in
California where she is making
her firstU._S. movie.f _-

t

The following announcements for
league house heads and residents
were made by Allene Golinkin, vice-
president of Assembly, in charge of
league houses.
Coeds are still needed for the Wil-
low Run party, and all women who
are interested in attending should
contact Miss Golinkin at 24471.
In making preparations for in-
stallation ceremonies, the names of
all league house presidents will be
needed. Those who did not attend
house presidents' meeting last Tues-
day, are asked to submit to Miss Go-

linkin a list including the house pres-
ident's name, the name of the league
house, the housemother's name, and
the number of women living in the
house.
All members of the tryout staff
of The Daily Women's Staff will
meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the Stu-
dent Publications Building. Wom-
en who are interested in joining
the Women's Staff, but who
missed the initial tryout meeting
may attend this second meeting on
Tuesday.

j ChIeriiAA/a.
A diamond ring of unsurpassed elegance-
A wedding band that speaks eloquence-
CHOOSE HER RING from our complete selection
of White Rose and Blue White Diamonds. Our
matched sets in solid gold are constant remind-

P E T - Alice Janz of Chicago
holds a pet fox, Ootzie, which a
neighbor captured on a hunting
rip in Minnesota.

S H I P "S S T A C K L I F T E D - The 76-ton, 56-foot-high funnel of the liner Mauretania is
lifted by a giant floating crane during repair operations at Liverpool, England.-

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