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January 16, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t I l MICTUG AN i)A.ILA

'LHTLIRSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1947

Concert To Be
Presented by
U' Orchestra
In conjunction with the Mid-
Western Conference on School Vo-
cal and Instrumental Music, to be
held here Friday through Sunday,
the University Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Prof.
Wayne Dunlap, will present a con-
cert at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union Ballroom.
Beethoven's First Symphony will
highlight the program which will
also include selections by Mozart,
Copeland and Effinger.
Following the concert, the or-
chestra will accompany the Ann
Arbor A Cappella Chorus, under
the direction of Geneva Nelson in
a program including selections by
Bach, Clokey and Franck.
Society Plans.
Lincoln Statue
An informal society, the De-
troit Lincoln group, is carrying on
a drive to collect $15,000 by next
December in order to erect a
statue, "Lincoln, the Frontiers-
man," on this campus.
The original bronze statue, sit-
uated on the grounds of the Ewa
Plantation School near Honolulu,
is the work of Dr. Avard T. Fair-
banks, resident artist of the Uni-
versity. He has estimated that the
replica will cost $15,000.
John Bodenstab, secretary of
the Royal Ark Association of De-
troit and a member of the Lincoln
society, has sent a letter to the
State Legislature asking that they
underwrite plans for the work. The
Board of Regents has already ap-
proved the erection of the figure,
which would be surrounded by a
split-rail fence. An unveiling on
Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12, in 1948
is the goal of the Detroit group.

UIN I ON-'aNQT ES

Those qualified for the final
round of play in the annual all-
campus duplicate bridge tourna-
ment will compete at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Grand Rapids Room
of the League.
Four pairs of players will be
chosen from final winners to rep-
resent the University in the Great
Lakes Zone play-off. Zone win-
ners will compete in the Chicago
finals.
The Michigan League and Un-
ion will again present the weekly
broadcast, "Michigan Maize," at
1:45 p.m. Saturday over station
WPAG.
The program's main object is to
publicize campus events, and to
include pertinent Michigan tradi-
tion and history. News of the an-
nyal J-Hop will be presented.
The organization of the various
committees producing the broad-i
casts is not as yet complete. Any-
one interested in the writing angle
of radio production are urged to+
apply to Bradley Straatsma at the
Union Student Offices, or Doris
Ann Arborite
Given Honor
Paul D. Bartlett of Ann Arbor,
has been made a full professor in
the chemistry department at Har-
vard University.
Full professorship, the highest
academic rank, has been awarded
to 23 members of the faculty of
Arts and Sciences there.
During the war, Prof. Bartlett
did special work for the Chemi-
cal Warfare Service and the Of-
fice of the Quartermaster Gen-
eral. Before joining the Harvard
staff in 1934, he was an instructor
in chemistry at the University of
Minnesota.

Kreuger at the League. In addi-
tion, students are needed for act-
ing and research.
* - .
Union members may purchase
tickets for the semi-annual "Blue
Book Bali" to be held Saturday,
Jan. 25, beginning Monday at the
main desk in the Union.
The dance, offered each semes-
ter will feature Frank Tinker and
his orchestra,
Prof. del rjoi
Prof. Julio del Toro, of the Ro-
mance languages department, was
recently elected president of the
National Federation of Modern
Language Teachers Associations.
At, the meeting in Washington,
D.C.; where the election took place,
Prof. del Toro also was appointed
to a position on a national
committee making a study of
the changes in modern language
teaching which have taken place
in this country during the past
few years.
While in Washington, he served
on the executive committee of the
American Association f Teachers
of Spanish and Portuguese. HIe
has been a professor in the Ro-
mance languages department here
since 1921.
Luncheon Series Begins
Phi Alpha Delta, legal fraterni-
ty, has inaugurated a series of
luncheons featuring prominent
lawyers as guest speakers.
Municipal Judge Jay H. Payne
addressed the first luncheon
Tuesday at which Professors Al-
bert F. Neumann and Marcus L.
Plant were initiated into the fra-
ternity.!

Dow Explains
Use of Tinfoil'
Against Radar
Dropping packaged tinfoil from
airplanes was one of the most suc-
cessful methods used by the Allies
in distorting German radar, ac-
cording to Prof. William G. Dow,
of the electrical engineering de-
partment when addressing a den-
tal school convocation yesterday.
"Tinfoil produced the same ef-5
fect on the German radar as the
echo of an airplane," he said. "The
defectors caused much confusion
arnone Lhe Germans in trying to>
figure out just where the planes
were."
When the Germans captured one
of the more recent pieces of radar
equipment, "they were greatly
shocked," lie said, by the technical
progress evident and by the high
serial number which caused themr
to greatly fear the abundance of
our equipment.
Prof. Dow was loaned to the
government by the University for
Sworking on a special transmitterI
tube for the British government.
He accomplished most of his work
at Harvard University.
Ail Rho Chi
:hooss ead
David R. Anderson was elected
president of Alpha Rho Chi, pro-
fessional fraternity for architec-
ture and allied arts, for the spring
semester at a recent meeting of
the group.
Other new officers are James I.
Blair, vice-president, William F.
Farrell, house manager, Leslie H.
Kenyon, secretary, Stuart N. Price,
:uperintend-nt, David L. Stiffler,
treasurer, and Carter B. Strong,
clerk. Robert C. Gaede is retiring
president of the group.

I,!

11.

PpaIsjoin others to make up a table
-s *lI after they arrive.
"Papa Is All" will be presented *
by the Little Theatre Group at 8
p.m. today at West Lodge Audito-
rium. The play will be enacted The University extension class
by an all-veteran cast of Village in psychology will meet at 8 p.m.
students under the direction of today at West Court.
Donald Decker. * *r

OUT THAR .. . at the Village

W~orkshop 9S

ri are

The art-craft workshop group
Bridge will be played from 3 to will meet at 8 p.m. today at West
5 p.m. today at West Court Com- Court. The group invites and
munity Building. Groups can eith- urges prospective members to
er make up their own tables or come.

I

For Ihat
Defelioux ]idnight Snack
Try
Miller's Box Lunch-
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-made Rolls and Individual Pies
Call 2-7171
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

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Because TlN)MIORROW Magazine believes that its future
lies in wilespread acceptance by students-tomorrow's cifi-
Ziis-aiid by the educators of today, we make this special
introd uctory offer which is valid only niitilIlebritary 8.1947.
Subscribe now and receive either of these two
fino books (regular price $3.00 each) FREE:
KING JESUS, Robert Groves' lively, highly readable, but
scholarly portrait of Christ. "Astonishing, erudite, interest-
mog and .. . brilliant . . ."-Book-of-the-Month Club News.
TEMPTATION, John Pen's passionate story of a young
man's struggle with the sordid realities of both poverty
and wealth ... moving from the pigsty hovel of his parents
to the gin-scented boudoirs of Budapest's luxury hotels.
"It swarms fascinatingly with gripping incidents ..."
--Associated Press.

BEGIN Your subscription with the
F% bruiry issue and start with these
pr o c w i ive articles anudstories:
Q "J Imt Crow at College". .. a
wv Et(t professor at a large unvers-
ir itf 1tM~~ini~elf faculty advisor to
S gr otip, and plecliar things
1,":iito happen on the campus...
* "Te C oscientious Objectors"
. . .ere's @afreh >approach to the
problem of the conehies . . . told
by a man who "worked" out the
war w ith the C.O.'s. .
0 ".Nancy' the story of a delin-
queni te('n-ager . . . riten by a
studeni at the University of Michi-
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MICHIGAN
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

RAtCHBURGERS

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Builetin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President. Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays.)
T lURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1947
VOL. LVYI, No. 83

Notices

Members of the Faculty: Mr. R.
McAester Lloyd, President of the
Teachers Insurance and Annuity
Association, will be on the campus
on Tuesday, January 21. Mr. Lloyd
will be in Rm. 1011, Angell Hall,
at 3:00 o'clock, for consultation
with members of the faculty who
wish to discuss with him questions
regarding their insurance or re-
tirement plans.
Alexander G. Ruthven
To All Veterans: Every veteran
enrolled at the University of Mich-
igan must file a Certification of
Absences for the Fall Semester,
1946, so that the Veterans Admin-
istration may have adequate basis
for paying subsistence and grant-
ing leave in the proper amount
when requested by the student.
Certification blanks will be avail-
ablefrom 8:30 a.m. to noon and
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. today,
Friday, Monday and Tuesday and
from 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday.
Veterans should report to their re-
spective colleges at the following
places and should leave their
blanks at their college office:
Literature, Science, and Arts,
Hall of University Hall;-Engineer-
ing, 255 W. Engineering; Gradu-
ate, Graduate School Office;
Law, Available with Registration
Material; Architecture and Design,
207 Architecture Bldg.; Pharmacy,
250 Chemistry; Business Adminis-
tration, 108 Tappan; Dentistry,
Secretary's Office Dentistry Build-
ing; Education, 1433 University
Elementary School; Forestry and
Conservation, 2045 Natural Sci-
ence; Music, 101 School of Music;
Action of the Administrative
Board, College of Literature, Sci-
North Main Opposite Court House
Today and Friday
WM. HENRY in
"ILNVIIBLE INFORMER"
-plus-
CHAELES STARRET in
"LAND RUSH"
Cartoon:
"Gruesome Twosome"
YOUR P PIC1'

ence and the Arts: A student in
the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts has been suspended
because she was found guilty of
having signed a library slip with a
fictitious name.
Choral Union Members whose
attendance records are clear,
please call for their courtesy
passes for the Horowitz concert on
the day of the performance, Fri.,
Nursing,.2036 Uniiversity'Hospital;
Public Health, Information Desk.
School of Public Health; Medicine,
123 W. Medical.
Alexander G. Ruthven
General Library Hours: From
Friday, Jan. 31, to Mon., Feb. 10,
the General Library will be open
on week-days from 8 a.m. to 6
p.m. It will be closed on Sundays.
In general, Divisional Libraries
will be open on short schedules,
i.e. 10-12 and 2-4 daily.
Exceptions are: the East and
West Engineering Libraries which
will be open from 9-12 and 2-5
daily.

p
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"With a big basket
of crisp shoe-C
string potatoes . .
We're also famous
for our fine meals.
Try them soon!

Matinees
2 - 4 P.M. 33C

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Nigts .ac .am ' V
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COMING "NOTORIOUS"
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0 "The New Czechoslovakia' by John Powers ... a real inside story of
a new type of democracy in a country which may set the pattern for other
European nations, especially those under the watchful eye of Soviet
Russia
And other vital, fast-moving articles and stories such as "The Arab
World: Myth and Reality" by L. C. Gray; "A Man Has to Eat' by Henry
Steig; Robert Bendiner's brilliant Washington analysis; and Harold
Clurman's discerning coverage of the theatre and motion pictures
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11 East 44th Street,
New York 17, N. Y.
Yes, enter my subscription immediately and send me my gift copy
of '] "KING JESUS" "TEMPTATION" (check volume de-
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Also
COLOR CARTOON

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IN- E- W

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203 EAST WASHINGTON STREET

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(Continued on Page 3)

a..

;;1

OPENING TONIGHT

THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH presents PLAY PRODUCTION in

"TH1 rlE

't tJ''l

COMEDY BY CLYDE FITCH

Tomorrow &Saturday
Evenings at 8:30 - Saturday Matinee at 2:30
Tickets 96c-72c-60c (tax incl.)
SPECIAL RATE FOR STUDENTS TONIGHT AND SAT. MATINEE, 42c
Box Office Opens Daily - Phone 6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

L

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"SAVE" SPECIAL EDITION! "SAVE" 9
0 0I L At D .R
SVC t C AQif
UJANUARYIO S IAL CLEKDANCE
.Special Entertainment between those tedious exams
Frn enjoy "one" evenin at the Union . r .. 9 to 12.

l NMIaNI1 I

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