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November 26, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-26

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Readers Comment on Current Topics

Mitigating Lewis-...
To the Editor:
WITH the acrimony and brick-
bats against John- L. Lewis
going unrebutted by the campus
liberals. it now seems a necessary,
although not propitious time, to
say something in mitigation of
Mr. Lewis. (I don't defend him.)
'T'he first charge, that John L.
is ruthless, is likely true. Nobody
gets on top of the heap who is
not. Herbert Hoover called lit
"rugged individualism:" To in-
dict John L. for ruthlessness is
rierely to indict him for possess-
ing Americanism in the wdy that!
Murray Garrson, Henry Ford, Car-'
negie ard Judge Gary possessed its
Jbhn L. is no worse than them.
Second, about this "paralysis"
of industry: let us not shed tears
over General Motors the way we
would over the victim of poliomye-
litis. In our system of free enter-.
prise "unfettered" by Government
controls, every commodity has its
price. Coal used to be cheap, be-
cause the men who dig it up were
foced to work cheaply. Now ,they
charge quite a bit for it.. So if in-
dustry wants coal, it can cough up
the dough; if it does not want
coal, it assumes the risk of the
open market, and uses other fuel.
Business is business.
About that famous "contract,"
what the terms are is like asking
what the Bible means: It never
will be settled. Anybody knows
that a party to a contract will try
to wriggle out of it if the contract
looks like a bad deal. 'Contract"
is not a reason; it is a slogan, used
by those who have an economic
advantage in using it. And the
joker-clause in the contract, is:
Granted that the Government is
ceirect in its interpretation of the
contract. ust how will it persuade
the 400,00 miners to perform the
contrac? Or will the government
accept daiages in lieu of specific
perform ane?
"Contract" is a fiction which
clarifies nothing. The people who
want coal .hould be willing to pay
for it in the same way that they
paid for meat, shoes, suits, white
shirts a n d nylons. If they don't
like tl. price, they (like Mrs.
NussbaunP can "sit tight until
the price is right" (which means
shivering); or they can go out and
chop wood.
-Emmet J. Donnelly
Law School

Provocative Ad . ..
To the Editor:
ONE of the most important du-
ties a campus newspaper
should perform, I believe, .is to
protectstudents from unscrupu-
lous _practices being perpetrated
on campus. It has been two days
now since the announcement was
made by a local firm that power-
ful and dangerous substances
have been made available to the
general public, and no word has
been printed in The Daily in re-
gard to them. Perhaps this matter
has not been brought to your at-
tention, but on reading the adver-
tising, which has been done up in
a fine Christmas style, regarding
hese materials, you will no doubt
agree with me that no male on
.ampus is safe with these mater-
als on the market. The most out-
standing of these ads goes:
FRENZY ... Sensuous as the
beat of a Tom-Tom.
Sultry, exotic FRENZY has a
touch of the primitive in it! A
savage, insistent power over the
senses. The French alone would
dare to create a pulse-pounding
perfume like this . . . the ven-
turesome alone will dare to wear
it.
Another:
POSSESSION . . . Inspired by
Rodin's masterpiece, "The Kiss,"
For the woman who wants to be
truly stirring, Cordey has cre-
ated POSSESSION, a perfume
wholly French in its daring, pos-
sessive quality. Wear it, you who
seek to enslave, for in POSSES-
SION the spell-binding power of
perfume is unrestrained.
The one hope for ushpoor males
on campus lies in the price of
these "Parfums," since they range
up to $110,000. Most coeds proba-
bly cannot put up this sum of
money, so perhaps we are compar-
atively safe. But, men, if you see
some femaleadvancing toward
you reeking like a greenhouse, be-
ware!
-Herbert Madalin
Village Bus Service .. .
To the Editor:
WOULD like to know why at
7:15 p. m. last Thursday, Nov.
14, the disoatchei of the Willow
Village buses flagged away two
empty buses and one loaded one

and proceeded to go home him-
self, while about twenty students
were left standing on the corner
to wait for the next bus, two hours
off.
How can students get any study-
ing done under conditions like
this?
If there is any explanation of
this and other similar examples
of utter di3regard for the students'
welfare, I would like to know it
before I let ve here.
-John Lauer
Editor's Note: Dispatcher Sam Con-
way, a party to the above incident,
told.The Daily (Nov. 18) that Plant
Superintendent Walter Roth had in-
structed all dispatchers to load busses
to capacity. Conway said that by his
count, the 14 passengers left standing
could have been accommodated on
the first bus, with five or six stand-
ing, but refused to get on that bus.
The bus arrived on timetand was two
minutes late in leaving the bus stop,
he said.
Party Opportunism .. .
To the Editor:
IT IS not my desire to share with
Messrs. Potter and Oppen-
heim a monopoly of The Daily edi-
torial page, but certain remarks
of Oppenheim require reply. It is
my hope that this will end the dis-
cussion.
His tome resolves itself into two
sections: ieply to my statements
of the' 13th and a few choice
thoughts of his own.
Re his age comparisons of Re-
publican and Democratic congres-
sional leaders: He managed to get
the inference that I held Demo-
crats to be youthful leaders. I hold
no brief for the Democratic par-
ty. Indeed I have more reasons,
personal reasons, to hate Mr. Bil-
bo than Potter and Oppenheim
put together and rolled up in a
Republican blanket. However,
history will bear me out that the
Democratic party since the estab-
lishment of our modern industrial
society has more often been on the
side of the economically meek
"who shall inherit the earth .... if
they can hold out long enough"-
Don Freem:nn. As to the political
alignments prevalent today, it is
regrettable that men of such di-
verse view find themselves in the
same party by tradition and that
men of similar views are separated
by inheritance.
May I then point out to Oppen-
UTISING

heim that my sole purpose in il-
lustrating examples of Republican
age was simply to put the light of
truth to Potter's absurd conten-
tion that the Republican victory
meant tha; a "young and vigor-
ous movement" was on its way to
save us from those "bungling, bu-
reaucratic New Dealers and Com-
munists"' f "campaign oratory"
as Wendell Willkie so aptly
phrased it. Incidentally what hap-
pened to the ti'uly "young vigor-
ous" Republican, hmmmmm?
In defense of Republican liber-
alism he cites two minor measures
and a non-political engineering
job that was in Mr. Hoover's field
(indeed, just about his only capa-
bility), as proof that the Republi-
cans are !t heart liberal "grass
rooters" (with a pardon to Mal-
colm Bing!ay). This I refute and
with the same stroke answer Op-
penheim' statements regarding
continuity of "political philoso-
phy.
Republicans were imperial in-
terventionists and Democrats iso-
lationists 40 years ago for the
same reas)n that their positions
are approximately reversed today.
Mr. Hearst's advertising clients
needed the Spanish-American war
and Teddy Roosevelt's White Fleet
to stabilize their investments, do-
mestic and foreign. For the pre-
servation of these same interests
they bitterly and unscrupulously
fought: ) New Deal reforms,
which dwarf the puny, picayune
measures listed by Oppenheim;
and 2) measures to curb Franco,
Benito the bum, and Hitler, who
were going to protect those sur-
reptitious c a r t e 1 agreements
against the "commies."
It's all of one mold, and parties
and policie haven't changed, just
adjusted tnemselves to the times
with opportunism.
--Robert Greene, 49L
* * *
On Palestine . ,
To the Editor:
AT A TIME when confusion and
false-reportin g a r e be-
clouding the deplorable facts in
the current Palestine crisis, it is
encouraging to read a true account
of the actual situation which ex-
ists there. The article written by
Mr. E. E. Ellis in Thursday's Daily
is certainly a commendable step
in the direction toward a more ac-
curate and more complete under-
standing of the issues involved.
Mr. William Posen's letter, in the
North Main Opposite Court House
-- Starts Today
Johnny Mack Brown in
"SHADOWS ON THE-
RANGE"
plus
Kane Richmond in
"TRAFFIC IN CRIME"

same issue of The Daily, admira-
bly emphasizes the need for such
information.
America's answer to the vital
question of placing Palestine un-
der a United Nation's Trusteeship,
under which it may evolve into an
independent Jewish Common-
wealth, is self-evident.
Official United States support
for the establishment of Palestine
as such a commonwealth was first
expressed by President Woodrow
Wilson in 1919. Three years later
the Congress of the U. S. unani-
mously adopted a joint resolution
re-pledging our support. In the
1944 Presidential Campaign both
the Democrats and Republicans
adopted planks on Palestine favor-
ing, in the words of the Democratic
platform, "such a policy as to re-
sult in the establishment there of
a free and democratic Jewish
Commonwealth."
In giving his approbation to this
plank, the late President Roose-
velt said, "I am convinced that
the American people give their
support to this aim.. ." And with-
in a few days after assuming the
leadership of the nation in April,
1945, President Truman endorsed,
this statement. Within the past
two years at least 85 per cent of
the population of the United
States, through resolutions of
their state legislatures, have gone
on record in favor of this policy
in regard to Palestine. And the
last Congress of the United States
passed a similar resolution re-af-
firming this policy.
Certainly, therefore, American
policy would seem to say that
PALESTINE SHOULD BE TAK-
EN OUT OF THE HANDS OF
GREAT BRITAIN, A NATION
BIASED BY ULTERIOR INTER-
ESTS, AND BE PLACED UNDER
AN IMPARTIAL UNITED NA-
TIONS TRUSTEESHIP.
-Harvey L. Weisberg
Thanksgiving
SPECIAL
Your favorite FREE delivery
service will start serving at
5 P.M. Thursday. Nov. 28,
Thanksgiving Day.
Call 2-6429
for prompt, courteous
delivery of our famous
SANDWICHES and
VITAMIN-PACKED MILK
CHUMLEE'S
IVUERTH
-'Today and Wednesday -
"WIFE OF MONTE CRISTO
with John Loder
and Lenore Aubert
- also -
"NO TIME FOR COMEDY"
with James Stewart
and Rosalind Russell

CLASSIFIED ADVEI

.._

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: red wallet, League lounge. Keep
money, nturn wallet with important
papers. Return League desk.
LOST: Gold identification bracelet. Psi
U badgeon front, "John" on back.
Reward. Call 2-3159.
LOST: Big, battered, brown Shaeffer
pen, with tape on cap, between West
Physics and E. Quad. Call 2-4591,
112 Tyler.
WILL PERSON who traded field coats
with me Thurs., Nov. 21, at George's
Grill contact me at Box 2, Michigan
Daily. ) 24
LOST: Man's Bulova wrist watch be-
tween State and South Division Wed-
nesday night . Call 2-6767. Reward.)83
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED - Ride to Net York City or
Vicinity on Dec. 20 or 21, for young
harried couple. Will share expenses
and driving. Call 2-6869 after 5 p.m.
WANTED: Ride to Escanaba or vicinity
by two male students on Dec. 20. Will
share expenses and driving. )27
WANTED: Ride for two to Grand Rap-
ids after 5 p.m., Wednesday. Share
expenses. Call Mrs. van Husen at
4121, Ext. 308. )2
HELP WANTED
DIETITIAN, part or full time for fra-
ternity serving 100. Apply 2006 Wash-
tenaw after 7 p.m.
STUDENTS for part time work at soda
fountain. Swifts Drug Store, 340 S.
State, Ph. 3534.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
-- NOW I
WILD! WONDERFUL!

FOR SALE
$700 DOWN, SMALL HOME. Move in
now. 1 block from bus. Utilities in.
Balance like rent. Owner 2-1575.
FOR SALE: Topcoat, cavalry twill, size
38, $15. Girl's 3-piece blue wool snow
suit, $8. Phone 8410 after 1:00.
ATTENTION fraternities, league hous-
es, sororities! The U. of M. Forestry
Club will take orders for ,high grade
Christmas trees, moderate price, up
to 8 feet in spruce or red pine, or to
20 feet in balsam. Phone University
Extension 463, 6:30 to 9:30 evenings
all week for information and orders.
All trees furnished by Forestry As-
sociates Inc., Hart, Michigan. )87
7-FT. LAMINATED hickory "splitkein"
skis, cable bindings, new poles and
size 8 ski-boots. Also ladies skates,
size 7. Call Ypsi 3132-W. )9
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-
Remodeliig--Alterations. "Bring your
sewing problems to us." Hildegarde
Shop, 116 E. Huron, 2-4669. )45
WANTED
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A bet-
ter price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St. )14
BOY TO WORK in fraternity house
kitchen for meals. 2-3 hours per day.
Call 2-6824. )1
M ICdIGAN
Today and Wednesday

DISHWASHERS for noon and evening
meals wanted by Pho Sigma Kappa,
1043 Baldwin. Call house manager,
2-6500. )16
MISCELLANEOUS,
UNWANTED HAIR permanently re-
moved! Short wave method-faster,
painless. Rhone 6373, First National
Building.
PHOTOSTATIC COPYING, Discharges,
Marriage Certificates, drawings en-;
larged or reduced. Leave your work
at Calkins-Fletcher Drugs. Purchase
camera. Card & Camera Shop.
ANY BEAUTIFUL GIRL interested in
asking a gentleman to Panhel Ball-
Call Available Opdyke, 2-6674.
BUSINESS SERVICES
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Liberty.
We have rebuilt used bikes for sale.
Your bike can be expertly repaired
also. ) 56
CHUMLEE'S
FREE DELIVERY of your favorite sand-
wiches and beverages. Every day but
Monday, 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Phone
2-6429. )8

lp

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Wednesday, Nov. 27 at 8:30 P.M.
ROBERT FRIERS
Presents America's Fastest, Funniest
COLOR FILM TRAVELOGUES
"MEXICAN HOLIDAY OF '46"
Tickets 50c and 75c, plus tax - NOW ON SALE
- "Robert Friers gives as lively and interesting a travelogue
as we've ever seen." -CHICAGO HERALD-AMERICAN.
Auspices Sociedad Hispanica
c~-.:oc== .--yo<==oe--o--oo- o---.yo ---o<= -4.

Ii . 1

12

13

14

DECEMBER THIRTEENTH
UNION El

& FOURTEENTH
IAL

TWO GREAT NIGHTS,
So you won't miss this Dance of the Year!

Tickets:

$2.50 per Couple. . . 9 to 12

.i W I I

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