100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1946

Bureau of Government Lists
Basic Faults in County Form

Choral Group
Organized for
Willow Village
The new Willow Village Choral
Union will hold its organizational
meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Ross
School.
A civic project endorsed by Prof.!
Hardin Van Deursen, of the School

GUILD ACTIVITIES:
Supper Meetings To Be Held
By Student Religious Groups

Four basic defects exist in Michi-
gan's form of county government,
according to Prof. Robert S. Ford,
director, and Claude R. Tharp, re-
search associate, of the Bureau of
Government.
In a new pamphlet entitled "Reor-
ganization of Michigan's County
Government," the two political sci-
entists list these defects as follows:
1. No over-all administrative
head. "Absence of a chief execu-
tive," they say, "is contrary to
good management principles in
both business and public admin-
istration."
2. A complicated administrative
organization in which there is con-
siderable duplication of function be-
tween agencies.
3. A board of supervisors that is
toio large and possesses both legis-
lative and administrative powers.
4. A "bed sheet" ballot of elective
officials. One reason for this is the
failure to distinguish between ad-
ministrative and policy-determining
functions, which results in the exist-
ing practice of electing both types of
officials.
"Any plan for the reorganization of
county government should be judged
with reference to these four basic de-
feets and the extent to which it cor-
rects them," the authors say.
According to Prof. Ford and
Tharp, reorganization would have
to simplify the governmental
structure so it would be more un-
derstandable to citizens, develop
an organization to make possible
the most effective functioning of
government, facilitate 'more effi-
cient use of the tax dollar, elimi-
pate duplication between agencies
and dep~artments, and establish
definite responsibility of a few
elected officials for the perform-
ance of governmental services.
The authors review past attempts

at reorganization of county govern-
ment, all of which have been de-
feated. "Undoubtedly," they say, "in
past elections many citizens have
voted against reorganization pro-
posals because they did not under-
stand the points at issue. Further-
more, it is a common technique in
opposing government changes to dis-
tort the objectives in an effort to
confuse the voter, or to capitalize on
his apathy, so he will either vote
against the proposal or not vote at
all."
The pamphlet describes what
other states have done by way of
constitutional reorganization of
county government. One method
is the "optional statute plan," by
which the legislature gives the
county a choice between a county
manager and a county executive
responsible to the board of super-
visors.
Although Prof. Ford and Tharp
believe that a constitutional amend-
ment is necessary for a thorough re-
organization of Michigan's county
government, they suggest a number
of changes that could be made under
statutory law without changes in the
constitution.
"The suggestion is sometimes
made for the development of a
more unified management in one
of the existing offices, such as the
county clerk," the two authors
point out. "However, it seems that
the office of county controller
would be a more advantageous
starting point. In addition to spe-
cific duties now conferred on the
controller, the legislature might
add new responsibilities, such as
budget preparation for presenta-
tion to the county board, recom-
mendations concerning appoint-
ment and compensation of person-
nel, and assisting the county board
in the coordination of county of-
fices and departments."
With some expansion of the duties
of the controller, according to Prof.
Ford and Tharp, Michigan counties
could in effect achieve a modified
manager plan without a constitu-
tional amendment.

Suppers, outdoor meetings and dis-
cussions will be held by the student
religious organizations today.
Members of the LUTHERAN STU-
DENT ASSOCIATION will leave for
an outdoor meeting at 3:30 p.m. from
the Zion Lutheran Parish Hall.
Speakers at the meeting will be
Jean Gringle and Eadie Olsson.
Bible Study Hour will be held at
9:15 a.m. at the Center, 1304 Hill St.
* * *
Following supper, which will be
served at 5 p.m. in the Parish Hall,
the BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
AND REFORMED S T U D E N T
GUILD will discuss "Christian Justi-
fication of Democracy."
A panel discussion on "New Testa-
ment Documents; Are They Relia-
ble" will be held by the MICHIGAN
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP at 4:30
p.m. in Lane Hall.
The ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD
will hold a cost supper at 6 p.m. at
the Guild House.
Following the meal, there will be a
fellowship sing and a speech, "Prayer
Changes Things," by the Rev. Har-
old W. Richardson from the First
Baptist Church in Jackson.
Dean Alice C. Lloyd will speak on
the "Place of Religion In Our Post-
war World" at the 6 p.m. supper
meeting of the CANTERBURY
CLUB.
Rowe To Give First
Journal Club Talk
The English Journal Club will hold
its first meeting of the semester at
7:45 p.m. Tuesday in the East Con-
ference Room of the Rackham Build-
ing.
Prof. Kenneth T. Rowe of the Eng-
lish department, who has recently
returned from work at the Columbia
Workshop Theatre in New York, will
speak on contemporary playwriting.
Refreshments and a general discus-
sion will follow the talk.

Elections will be held by the CON-
GREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD following supper at 6
p.m. at the Guild House.
* * *
The Unitarian Student Group will
hold a regular Sunday night supper
meeting at 6 p.m. today at 1917
Washtenaw.
The group will continue a discus-
sion on "The Basis of Unitarianism."
Vets Take Possession
Of N.Y. Senate Chamber
ALBANY, N. Y., Oct. 19 -(AP)-
About 75 World Warveterans who
forced their" way past guards and
took possession of the New York
State Senate chamber interrupted
their harrangue against the lack of
housing tonight to listen to a state
police offocial invite them to leave.
Major George M. Searle, deputy
superintendent of state police, and a
veteran of both world wars, explained
the state capitol normally closes at
5 p.m. and asked the veterans to
"wind up your business as quickly as
you can."

D0isplay Contest
Will Highlight
Homecoming
(.Continued from Page '1)
been asked to attend a meeting at
4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Uinon, to
discuss banners, effigies and house
displays.
Winding up the weekend, Elliot,
Lawrence and his orchestra, who
are rapidly rising in the collegiate
favorite. band world, will play for
the Homecoming Dance from 8:30
to midnight Saturday in the In-
tramural Building. Built around a
football theme, the dance will be
informal.
Tickets for Varsity Night and the
Homecoming Dance will be on sale
throughout the week as long as they
last, in booths in the Union and the
League aiid on the Diagonal from 9
a.m. to noon and from 1 to 4 p.m.
Special interviews a r e being
planned for Saturday morning from
the steps of the Union, with all-
Americans from Michigan. A trans-
scription of several of them will be
made by radio station WJR and will
be played back just before game time
that afternoon.

U' Vets Bureau
Will Sponsor
Meeting Here
A conference of veterans service
bureau representatives from seven
leading midwestern universities,
sponsored by the University Veter-
ans Service Bureau, will meet in the
Rackham Building tomorrow and
Tuesday.
Clark Hopkins, associate editor of
the VSB, will open the conference at
9:15 a.m. tomorrow and will present
an outline of the work of the Uni-
versity Bureau. During the morning
delegates from Ohio State, North-
western, Chicago, Illinois, Minnesota,
and Wisconsin will describe the
functioning of the veterans affairs
offices in their schools.
At 2 p.m., T.O. Hall, chief of the
Advisement and Guidance Division,
Branch Office, Veterans Administra-
tion, Columbus, .,Ohio, will discuss
"The Coordination of the Veterans
Administration with University Of-
fices of Veterans Affairs."
Provost James P. Adams will open
a round table dscussion at 8 p.m. at
which a representative from each of
the University offices having con-
tact with the veteran will discuss the
functions of their respective offices.

7 N____________________________________

MRS. GRACE H. BLAKE
...to direct new chorus
of Music, the Choral Union will be
directed by Mrs. Grace H. Blake,
former student at the Detroit Con-
servatory of Music and choir director
for the past 30 years.
University residents of Willow Vil-
lage, with or without voice experi-
ence, are eligible to join the new
choral group.
City Planning Group
Will Hold Annual Meeting
The Michigan Association of Mu-
nicipal Planning Officials will hold
its annual meeting in Flint today.
Prof. John W. Hyde, of the archi-
tecture school, will speak on "Stand-
ards for Determining Types of Resi-
dential Zones."

III

NEW FALL

BOOKS

You will always find
a good selection
of current.bestsellers

1

at

Overbeck
BOOKSTORE
1216 South University

Today and Monday --
"JANIE GETS MARRIED"
with
Joan Leslie - Robert Hutton
_ and
"SHE WROTE THE BOOK"
with Joan Davis - Jack Oakie
Coming Tuesday
"THE VIRGINIAN"

.

ml

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Most pretentious . . . 2-fam-
ily in Ann4rbor. Beautiful living rooms
with unusual fireplaces, 4 and 5 bed-
rooms each, tile baths, oil burner, ex-
clusive design. Call 7805, E. A. Lechner.
)90
STUDENTS: solve your transportation
problems; ride an English lightweight.
3-speed gear, 2 caliper brakes, pump oil
bath chain guard. $79.50. CONTINENT-
AL SPORTS SHOP, 6453 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, LA-7237, 24253 Woodward Ave,
Ferndale, Lincoln 1-2650. )23
TWO PREWAR bicycle tires and inner
tubes, $3.50. Also two prewar rubber
raincoats, $5.00 apiece. Call after 7 p.m.
Apt. 203, 332 E. William. )3
WANTED TO RENT
THREE MEN graduate students desire fur-
nished apartment for ,next semester. Will
pay $100 per month. Box 51, Michigan
Daily. )4
HELP WANTED
MALE OR FEMALE FOUNTAIN HELP: 3
schedules available: 3-6 p.m., 6-10 p.m.,
3-10 p.m. If hours suit your require-
ments, apply in person to Withams
Drug Company, corner of S. U. and
Forest. ) 34
COSMETIC SALESLADY-with experience
selling perfumes and treatment lines.
Position open for full time or part time
work. Good pay-Phone 9216 for ap-
pointment. )27
WANTED
WANTED: 1 ticket Horowitz concert, 1 for
Lehman concert. Jack Smith, 204 Mich-
igan House, 2.4401. )91
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
MISCELLANEOUS
ALL FORMER COOLEY High School Band
and orchestra students on campus please
get in touch with Mary Pinney, 2-3225.
)6
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us." Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
PERSONAL
GHOSTS attention! Prepare for ghosting
expedition. Important orders pending.
)13

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Brown Ronson cigarette lighter.
Initials J.C.A. Call Curt, 4452. Reward.
)5
LOST ON CAMPUS: Light grey raincoat
with Bostonlabel. Reward. Call Dean
Harbin, 22263. )8
LOST: Thursday night Hill Auditorium.
Black suede gloves. Call 4121 Ext. 354,
Mrs. McNeil, or Ph. 4478. )12
LOST: Oct. 12, pink rimmed, modified
Harlequin glasses in blue leather case
with red lacing. Florence Goldfinger,
9158. )11
LOST: October 18, wrist watch with brown
band, make "Rima"-possibly in League
or Stockwell. Dot Fishman - 9158. )10
LOST: Ladies Elgin Deluxe wrist watch
lost between Jordon Hall and Tyler
House. Dorothy D. Hill Phone 24561. )9
BUSINESS SERVICES
BOOKKEEPING AID for Fraternities, Sor-
orities, other institutions. Nominal mon-
thly charge. Telephone Charles Koethen,
2-4925 between 9 and 11 a.m. )1
WANTED: Dictation, typing and dicta-
phone transcription to do in my home.
Mail Box 56. )38
ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
Sales - John Jadwin - Service
855 Tappan Phone 2-7412 or 2-2683
)41
TYPEWRITERS, office machines cleaned,
repaired. Work guaranteed. Three-day
service. Calculators sold and rented.
Pick-up and delivery. Office Equipment
Service Co., 111 S. 4th Ave., 2-1213. )26
DAY NURSERY
DAY NURSERY: Opening in Ypsilanti by
a veteran, for veteran's use. Hours to be
covered: 7:30 A.M. to 6:00 P.M., 6 days a
week. Registered nurse in charge. Con-
tact H. M. Stitt, 526 W. Michigan, Ypsi.
)2
North Main Opposite, Court House
__Today thru Tuesday
Johnny Weissmuller in
"SWAMP FIRE"
plus
Ramsey Ames in
"BELOW THE DEADLINE"
News and Serial Chapter 6

;-

..,

CONTINUOUS FROM 1 P.M.

STARTS
TODAY!
It's -Their Best Yet...

SHAGG' S

RJFIORMAL ANDO
STR~EET WEARI

Colors: White,

Pink, Maize, White Smoke

i

I

Styles: Swagger, Long, Short, Belted
03 .95

J TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

1th ANNIVERSARY
by doing your

,
.=.
,<
. ,

Ammodgr AM AM 1 111

I

11 1

11

I

- II I II II I I .~ Mff'~~' - W ~ ~

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan