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February 19, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

xrnglslnitiatedHere

TITLE ON ICE:
Heyliger Seeks To
Crown Puck Kings

"M

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

e Setomer To Take

t,

. , i

harge of New Sport'
ighters Not Likely To Compete This Year
tte to Red Tape Involved in Getting Started

SPORT
SCRAPBOOK

By JERRY ALEXANDER
Mhe old weight lifting room at
Intramural Building is really
msing these days as the bulg-
muscle boys have been re-
ced by the sweating torsos of
hters.
'he sport of boxing has hereto-
e been non-existent at Michi-
i; but now, under the impetus
'any students interested in the
ivity, it is rapidly picking up
mentum.
Comer Is Leader
Che boxers, under the leadership
Lee "Satch" Setomer are going
out to rectify the above situa-
n by gathering petitions of over
)0 names to the effect that the
lersigned would like to see box-
as a going sport in the near
ure. According to Setomer,
se petitions will be handed to
:rew Baker of the Sports De-
'tment, who will then appoint a
nmittee to look into the matter.
competition in this sport takes
ce from February to April and
:ulminated by an intercollegiate
rnament in the latter month.
hough it is reliably reported
,t there is excellent material
,ilable here,. it looks like the
Student tickets for Friday's
vimming meet with OSU will
0 on sale at 8:30 a.m. tomor-
w. They will continue on sale
; the Athletic Ticket Office
ntil 4:30 p.m. Friday. If any
re left, they will be sold after
00 p.m. at the door.
iters won't be able to compete
s season due to the red tape
olved in getting started.
ny Good Boxers
Some of the more prominent
:ers are Ed Burns, Bob Harri--
, Andy Kerr, Liner Litzy and
unofficial coach, Lee Setomer.

.ee himself went undefeated dur-
ng his stay at the Navy's North
Tarolina Preflight School besides
' good deal of experience in A.A.U.
,ompetition.
Despite the fact that Setomer is
now in charge, before Michigan
zould enter competition a regular
woach would have to be appointed
as amateur rules forbid its mem-
bers from official mentoring.
Practice Three Times Weekly
Practice periods so far have been
Tickets for the hockey game
Saturday night will go on sale
Friday morning at the Athletic
Building at 8:30.
This sale will continue until
noon on Saturday. A limited
number of general admissions
will be available.
Any remaining tickets will go
on sale at 6 p.m. Saturday at
the ice rink.
held on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 4 to 6 p. in. Any
students, wishing to don the gloves
and learn a few of the finer points
of boxing is cordially invited to
put in an appearance at the above
times. A special invitation is of-
fered to those who shave any sort
of experience at all.
Michigan is supposed to be on
the road toward having the great-
est athletic setup in the country
and it seems that it would be rath-
er incomplete without a team rep-
resenting us in this sport.
Tomorrow on this page we'll
take a glance into the situation
that exists with the fencing boys
and Thursday a look at the gym-
nastic setup.
Wisconsin won the Western
Conference championship in 1905
by winning the only league game
they played.

By JACK MARTIN
Daily Sports Editor_ J
MICHIGAN IS FALLING BE-
HIND in the world of sports.
In view of the large-scale build-t
ing program announced recently,
this may appear to be a startling
proposition-and in view of the
extensive weekly 'schedule of var-
sity contests it may seem a little
unwarranted.
But set up a comparative pic-
ture. Michigan has at present
varsity teams in Western Confer-!
ence competition representing
football, basketball, wrestling in-
door and outdoor track, swim-
ming, tennis, golf, baseball and1
hockey.
Illinois has these, AND fenc-
ing, gymnastics, cross-country-
all of which are varsity-letter
sports. Wisconsin goes even fur-
ther-having varsit'y competi-
tion as well in crew and boxing.
Michigan, in other words, has
eight sports in which a man
may earn an "M"-Wisconsin
has twelve. Illinois has ten.
We see no reason why the Uni-
versity of Michigan could not
sponsor a varsity team in boxing,
fencing, and gymnastics. Within
the next three days The Daily will
present a survey of the present
situation in each of these three
activities, and present an argu-
ment of two in favor of their adop-
tion as letter-sports.
The petition procedure out-
lined in the accompanying news
story has a little ring of famili-
arity in it. Several years ago a
similar petition for a similar
team was submitted to the same
Board-and it didn't get by the
first round. Reasons for such
action were naturally listed, the
two most important being that
sufficient competition was un-
available for a varsity team and,
furthermore, boxing was a little
too dangerous.
AS WE SEE IT four main ques-
tions must be answered by the
Board in determining the feasi-
bility of establishing boxing on a
varsity level. The first deals with
the financial angle. With capacity
crowds on hand for practically ev-
ery sport this season, we can hard-
ly see how the'future could be very
dark in this respect. Furthermore,
boxing, wherever it has been es-
tablished. has never failed to be
a drawing card. With suitable
matches arranged, it could pay
its own way in a short time.
The second question is whe-
ther or not there is sufficient in-
terest in the sport. This is eas-
ily answered by the facts. there
are a thousand signatures on the
petition, and twenty men are
working out regularly now.
The third question concerns fa-
cilities. Practice space is available,
and is being used now, in the I-M
building, and a removable ring
for meets could easily be set up
in Yost Field House, and just as
easily taken down when the bouts
ended.
. The fourth, and most important,
question is that of sufficient com-
petition. Among the Big Nine
schools there are teams at Wiscon-
sin and Minnesota, and up in East
Lansing there is Michigan State.
All three of these schools have
been able to find a most satis-
factory number of opponents. Why
couldn't Michigan: There is no
drawback here.

By HIERB LORIENZ
,In the hope of creating a greater
interest in hockey as a collegiate
sport, Coach Vic Heyligsr of the
University of Michigan has insti
tuted a campaign to determine a1
National Collegiate Hockey Cham-
pion.
Under the auspices of the Na
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion, Heyliger would have a play-
off of teams representing the Far
West, The Rocky Mountain Area.
The Mid-West region, and the
East Coast with the winner taking
national honors.
Interest in Hockey Growing
With the interest in hockey
growing all over the United States,
Heyliger's chief problem is one of
organization. He has drawn up
plans for the organization of the
four sectors into individual leagues
in order to determine sector cham-
pions.
In the Far West Heyliger has
hopes of getting all the Coast
schools in the league. California
and Washington now have teams,
and they will be joined next sea-
son by Stanford and possibly two
other schools.
Top Michigan
Billiard Stars
In Union Tilt
Michigan Union's pool parlor
will be the scene of fancy billiards
action at 7:00 p.m. tonight as a
quintet of Wolverine performers
combine talents in the opening
round of inter-collegiate pocket
billiards competition.
The nation-wide program, spon-
sored by the Billiards Association
of America, includes top-ranking
contenders from 27 colleges and
universities.
Wolverines in Eastern Group
Michigan finds itself pitted in
the New England and Eastern Sec-
tion, which also embraces Buf-
falo, Pennsylvania, Columbia, Cor-
nell, Ohio State, and Rhode Island
State College.
Sectional tournaments in
straight rail and three cushions
will be staged on February 26 and
March 6, respectively.
In the pocket events tonight at
the Union, Capt. Andy Sullivan.
talented ace from Port Huron, and
cohorts Jim Mummey, Andy Pawi
ton, Mark Abend, and Joe Sobo-
eski, will give the Michigan cue
fans something to cheer about.
Herb Roche and "Corky" Corman
stand ready for reserve duty.
Key Shot System Followed
Don Krueger, who made the nec-
essary arrangements for tonight,
revealed that all billiards events
will be conducted on a telephone
basis. Participants, he pointed out,
will follow a key shot system of
play, which permits intercollegiate
competition on an "absentee
basis." This means players do not
have to leave their home campus.
Diamonds
and
Wedding .
SRings
77North University Ave.

The Rocky Mountain Region
now has teams at the University of
Colorado, whom Michigan played
on their western trip, and Mon-
tana School of Mines. These teams
would be the nucleus of about a
six-team league.
Wolverines Head Mid-West
In our own Big Nine Conference,
which would represent the Mid-
West schools, Minnesota and
Michigan already have teams.
To supplant these schools Illi-
nois, who played intercollegiate
hockey before the war, will proba-
bly have a team again next fall.
Both Purdue and Wisconsin are
toying with the idea of having
teams, and the Michigan College
of Mines has indicated a desire to
play in a league of this sort.
Wealth of Material in East
In the Eastern States a wealth
of material for a league makes
Heyliger's idea more imposing.
The Ivy League, which has among
its members Yale, Harvard, Cor-
nell, Princeton, and Pennsylvania,
could play the independent schools
to determine the national repre-
sentative of the East.
Each of the regional champions
would meet every year to establish
the National Collegiate champion
of the United States. Since Can-
ada already has Canadian Col-
legiate playoffs, Heyliger posed the
possibility that a further playoff
could determine the collegiate
champion of North America.

Publicatton In The Daly Oieial
Bulletin is constructive notice to allt
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be senit in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President. Room 102 1
,ngellBali, by 3:0p.m.on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays.)
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19, 1947 a
VOL, LVh, No. 94t
Notices
The University Business Office
and all departmental offices will
be closed on Washington's Birth-
day, Saturday, February 22.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
All NACP students contact Com-
mander McQuiston immediately.-
The General Library and thc
Divisional Libraries will be closed
on Washington's Birthday, Satur-
day, February 22.
Veterans: The attention of all
veterans is called to the recent
interpretation of the Veterans
Administration with regard to tak-
ing courses on a refresher, or any
non-credit basis.
The Veteran Administration
will make payment for tuition
supplies and subsistence only un-
der the following conditions:
1. The veteran must enroll in
the course on a refresher or non-
credit basis. Change of election
regulations for the school or unit
in which the veteran is enrolled
will govern any change of status
from credit to non-credit.

2. The Veteran must do all the
work required of the students en-
.rolled in the course for, credit, ex-
uept for taking the credit exami-
nations.
The veteran pursuing educa-
tional training under P.L. 346 who
drops a portion of his course dur-
ing the semester for any reason
will have his subsistence adjusted
on a pro-rated basis. The case of
chose who are in training under
P.L. 16 will be handled on an indi-
vidual basis by the Veterans Adm-
ministration official responsible
for their records.
Payment for subsistence allow-
ance, charges against eligibility
time, or payment for instructional
supplies will not be allowed by
the Veterans Administration on
courses requiring only attendance
at class without doing the work
assigned.
To All Graduate and Undergradu-
ate Students:
At a meeting of the University
Committee on Student Conduct

held January 28, 1947, the
ing motion was adopted:
That this Committeea
chaperoned and unchapero
change and guest dinner
change dinners to be deft
meals in men's residenc
women's residences atten
representative groups of m
of approved organizations
other sex; guest dinners tc
fined as meals in men's res
and women's residencesra
by guests of the other s
may or may not belong to
sity organizations. Gue
week-day dinners are to a
approximately 5:30 p.m.
to leave at approximately
for Sunday dinners, the gu
to arrive at approximatel3
and are to leave at approx
3 p.m.
In accordance with the
motion, the regulation rela
women guests, paragraph :
Specific Standards of C
page 25, UNIVERSITY RE
(Continued on Page 4

I " "

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S
a pfBY

They're Poles Apart on:
"What's Best in Esquire?"

We gave some of your classniales a
sneak preview of the March issue of
Esquire (now on the newsstands) a few
weeks hack. They couldn't agree on
what particular feature was best.

CAG
"Ial
first,c
(are t
igote
the '1

E STAR PREFERS SPORTS
w'ays read Esquire's -sports stuff
anyway. And in this issue, there
vo terrific articles on horse racing
a big kick out of. Second best is
Falling Plasterer."'
PETE ELLIOT, '47
Sigma Chi
BASKETBALL STAR

EX-SOLDIER PICKS ESQUIRE GIRLS
"I don't read- all the stories, I admit,
but I make up for it in looking at the
Glamor Gallery. That one special paint-
ing of a beautiful gal playing leapfrog
in a poo1 has my vote..and howv!"
DENNY YOUNGBLOOD, '48
Sigma Chi

.'
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PUBLIC SPEAKER SELECTS BOOK MUSICIAN CHOOSES STORY ABOUT
REVIEWS "Book reviewers don't come A SONG "I practically memorized the
any better than A. J. Liebling, and this Feb. Jazz issue, and in this March
time his reports on the Bitter Season, number my favorite was the ale of
Mister Roberts, and The Iron Chain how Sweet Adeline came to be written
make excellent reading." . .. named . . . and famous."
TOM WALSH, '4a BOB GOLDMAN, '47
Independent Independent
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"Esquire

Yes, they all had their own
favorite among the dozens
of Esquire features. The

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