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March 21, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

'TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

CENTENNIAL BANQUET:
Congregational Church Will
Celebrate 100th Anniversary

The First Congregational
Church of Ann Arbor, which was
founded March 23, 1847, will
celebrate its 100th anniversary
this week-end.
At the Centennial Banquet, to
be held at 6 p.m. tomorrow in the
Academy...-
(Continued from Page 1)
8 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre, E. C. Prophet, president of
the Academy, from Michigan State
College, will discuss "The Tourist
and Resort Industry."
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen, of
the School of Music, will present
a recital at 9:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall. He will be
accompanied by Ava C. Case.
Following. the recital an in-
formal reception will be held at
9:45 p.m. in the East and West
Conference Rooms of the Rack-
ham Building.
Saturday's program includes a
meeting of the Academy Council
at 1:30 p.m. in Rm. 4065 of the
Natural Science Building and a
business meeting of the Academy
at 3 p.m. in Rm. 2116 of the Nat-
ural Science Building.
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

Church, Prof. Emeritus Calvin O.
Davis, of the education school,
will present a copy of his book
"The History of Congregational-
ism in Ann Arbor" to each family
belonging to the Church. Shirley
W. Smith, vice-president emeri-
tus of the University, will act as
toastmaster.
Provost James P. Adams, Prof.j
John Bradshaw of the mathe-
matics department, Prof. Davis,
Mrs. Clifford Woody and Flora
May Slosson will also be on the
evening's program.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr, present
minister of the church, will speak
at the Centennial Worship Service
to be held at 10:45 a.m. Sunday.
Dr. Robert Bartlett of Plymouth
Church. Lansing, will give an ad-
dress at the community anniver-
sary service at 3 p.m. Sunday.
President Alexander Ruthv en.
Dean Hayward Keniston, of the
literary college and a representa-
tive from the Ann Arbor Council
of Churches will bring their greet-
ings.
A reception and tea will follow.
Hillel To Open
Sandwich Bar
"Corned-Beef Corner," a snack
bar sponsored by the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation, will open from
10:45 p.m. to midnight tomorrow
at the Foundation.
Serving soft drinks and sand-
wiches, the "Corner" will be open
every Saturday night.

PhIdlpS...
ConinluedI11.0111Page 1)
lps "ontinued. "I duly registered
my claim last June and sat back
to await the money." Back came
a letter from the Third Assistant
Postmaster General's office in-
forming me that the postal clerk
in Shanghai had undercharged
me five cents for registry and that
my claim for $50 was void. It
seems as if Congress had slipped
by a blanket one-third postal rate
increase during the war and
Shanghai hadn't gotten the word."
.Phillips promptly went to work
digging up legal points that might
strengthen his case. He enlisted
the help of law professors and
finally received their concerted
opinion that he "had a good case
against anyone but the U. S.
Government." On Feb. 7, back
went another letter to the Post-
master General.
This time Phillips had spared
no pains. His language was red-
olent with legal phraseology and
his sentences bristled with refer-
ences to "breach of contract, duly
appointed agent and liability to
the principal."
The Government's reply swept
aside Phillip's proposition, cited
several supporting cases, quoted a
ruling of the Controller General
("I didn't even know the Control-
ler General ever made rulings" was
Phillips comment) and informed
him that they were willing to pay
$5 on his $50 claim.
"What could I do?" Phillips
asked. "I've got a sneaking sus-
picion. that they rang in a Har-
vard lawyer on me. I can't even
take it into cotwt if the Govern-
ment won't recognize my case.
Anyway, I'm still convinced that I
have a legal right to that $50."
Lake Superior is 1,300 feet deep
in some places.

1

MICHIGAN
NOW

"RAZOR'S EDGE" Starts at 1:23-4:00-6:40-9:20 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW PLAYING!

I

Ru
Coming! WALLACE BEERY "Mighty McGurk'
Old Mother Hubbard went to the
cupboard
To get her poor dog a bone,
ri *But when she got there,
u The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.
She took him that day
To the GRANADA CAFE
Where they could eat their fill,
They liked it so well,
(For the food they both fell)
That they've been there ever since.
0 OBSERVE OUR NEW HOURS
ry Weekdays . . . 7:30 A.M.-1 1:30 P.M.
~jTuesdays . . . . 7:30 A.M.- 8:00 P.M.
Sundays . . . . 1 1 :30 A.M.-1 1 :30 P.M.
,.;r=:>< ;0<;;:> <::: 0 := 0 :::> <:;:> <:::o

Noted Actress
Will Present
Finial Lectur'e
Margaret Webster. famous
Shakespearean actress and direc-
tor, will close the 1946-47 Orato-
rical Association lecture series at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium with a speech on "The Ad-
venture of Acting."
Miss Webster will illustrate her
discussion of what the actors' art
means and has meant in the his-
tory of the English-speaking peo-
ples by giving excerpts from the
great plays of the last 300 years.
The daughter of Dame May
Whitty. the famous English ac-
tress. and Benjamin Webster, a
noted Shakespearean actor, Miss
Webster was virtually reared in
the theatre. She has directed such
well-known stars as Maurice
Evans, Helen Hayes, Judith An-
derson and Paul Robeson, and has
also acted in "Saint Joan." "The
Trojan Women." "The Sea Gull"
and most of Shakespeare's plays.
Tickets foi the lecture will be on
sale from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2
to 5 p.m. today and until lecture
time tomorrow at the Hill Audito-
rium box office.
Fathers...
(Continued from Page 1)
are expecting a delivery. Our
standard answer is 'We are always
expecting one!' "
The student veterans father's
most difficult problem, besides the
harrowing wait, is the problem of
transportation that results from
living at Willow Run. Most of
them have to depend on friends
who own cars because the bus is
obviously out of the question and
taxis are hard to get and expen-
sive. Evidently prospective fath-
ers encounter the same problem in
town too, Miss Avery declared.
"We once had a pair of frantic
men rush into the hospital for
aid. They had had to walk their
wives to the hospital but the wom-
en couldn't make it up the hill."
However nervous and excited
the veterans are in the waiting
room, they hardly ever protest
against the ruling that fathers
are not allowed in the labor room,
Miss Avery said. "They are never
difficult about demanding to come
up. Do you think it is the result
of their army taining?" she ask-
ed.
The proud new papa's most
thrillingtexperience istthe trip
home with mama and the baby.
"I always make them carry the
baby," Miss Avery emphasized.
The new papa is usually grinning
from ear to ear and inevitably
makes the comment: "So this is
what I've been waiting for for nine
months!"
(Continued from Page 1)
close what other recommendations
would be made on the basis of the
first two days of inspection, ex-
cept to mention that North Hall
should have a sprinkling system.
Burns urged weekly fire drills
at the hospital andkadvised that
specific persons should be made
responsible for carrying out the
infants and assisting firemen in
transporting bedridden patients.
He ordered doors to the hospi-
tal's one entrance chnged to
swing outward and recommended
demolition of a wooden passage-
way communicating with other
buildings, since it would facilitate

the spread of flames.
The single steep open staircase
forming a nine-foot square flue
from ground to roof was called a
major danger. He found that
overcrowding had led to storage
of inflammable materials in clos-
ets and in blocking corridors with
desks and other equipment.
Walter Roth, Plant Superin-
tendent, denied any knowledge of
the story in the Detroit News and
said he had received no report on
the fire inspection.
Henry Contest
*1
Winners Told
Ben H. VandenBelt. '49, and
Donald C. Mitchell, '50. bested 20
other entries in the Patrick Henry
Speech contest yesterday and will
represent the University in re-
gional competition Thursday in
Detr'oit.
John Moneyer was selected as
alternate to VandenBelt in the
junior-senior division and Wil-
son C. Deever was named alter-
nate to Mitchell in the freshman-
sophomore division.
The winners will receive $50 war
bonds.

Publication i The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the offfice of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by :3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
FRIDAY, MARCH l21. 1977
VOL. LVI. No. 1191
Notc s
L S & A Freshman Five-Week
Progress Reports will be given out
in the office of the Academic
Counselors, 108 Mason Hall, in the
March 21. Friday. D thru J.
March 22. Saturday. A thru C.
Five-week grades for all Fresh-
man Engineers are due in Dean
Crawford's Office on Saturday.
Mairch 22. Report blanks will
be furnished through department
secretaries, or by campus mail di-
rect to instructors.
Students, College of Literature,
Science and the Arts: Except un-
der extraordinary circumstances,
courses dropped after Satui'day.
March 22, by students other thanI
freshmen will be recorded withj
the grade of "E".
Reapplication for Mten's l ous-
ing for the Fall and Spring Se-
mesters of 1947-48: Men students;
who are now living in the Resi-
dence Halls and wish to remain in
the Residence Halls for the Fall
and Spring Terms 1947-48 must
file reapplication forms with the
House Director during the week;
of March 24. No applications will
be accepted after April 1.
The Alumnae Council requests
women students having an aca-
demic average of 2.6 or better and
interested in cooperative living to
call at the Office of the Dean of
Women if they wish to apply for
residence in Henderson House in
the fall semester.
Late and overnight permissions:
The Office of the Dean of Wom-_
en accepts requests for late per-
missions and overnight permis-
sions only during office hours.j
Emergencies arising after the of-
fice is closed are handled by

housemothers. Atteniion is called
to the student government rule:
"Housemothers may give late per-
mission on week nights (Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thurs-
day) only in the case of unavoid-
able and justifiable emergencies
which arise after the Office of
the Dean of Women is closed for
the day. Such emergency during
the week must be reported by the
student the following day to the
Of1ice of the Dean of Women. at
which time she must present a
written statement of the circum-
stances from her housemother."
I i-rid Veterans of World War
11-Terrace Apartments: Oppor-
tunity will be provided Friday.
9 a.m. to 12 noon and 1:30 to
4:30 p.m.), Saturday. March 22
9 a.m. to 12 noon) for students in
the above group to file a petition
fog residence in the Terrace Apart-
ments. Student applications for
residence in these apartments will
be considered according to the
following qualifications:
1. Only married Veterans of
World War II may apply.
2. Michigan residents will be
ien first consideration: how-,
ever. out-of-state students may
register at this time for possible
future vacancies. (See Regents'
ruling on definition of Michigan
resident. "No one shall be deemed
a resident of Michigan for the
purpose of registration in the Uni-
versity unless he or she has re-
sided in this state six months next
preceding thte date of proposed en-
rellment.")
3. Veterans who have incurred
physical disability of a serious na-
ture will be given first considera-
tion. A written statement from
Dr. Forsythe of the University
Health Service concerning such
disability should be included in
the application.)
4. No student will be considered
who has completed less than two
terms in this University.
5. Only students who, at the
time of petitioning, are within two
years of completing degree re-
quirements will be considered.
6. Length of overseas service
and particularly combat duty will
be important determining factors.
7. In considering an applicant's
total length of service A.S.T.P.,

APARTMENT FOR SALE
'rhree' roomns-.. . Completely fur-
nished . . . Reasonable terms..
And all n wheels. The 1947 Palace
Ali-Alunwinum House Trailer.
DUTIL & SON TRAILER SALES
2329 Jackson Avenue

i

-Liberty St. Between Michigan and State Theatres
George Lun, Proprietor
DELICIOUS FOODS QUICK SERVICE
Both
PLATE LUNCHEONS
CHINESE and Daily
AMERICAN Styles At Reasonable Prices
'Chop Suey and Chow Mein To Take Out
Drop in for a Meal, a Sandwich,
or a Cup of Coffee during the Afternoon
YOU ARE WELCOME HERE
FREE LECTURE
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:
Ii'S GODLINESS AND GRANDEUR
by Oscar Graham Peeke, C.S.B,
of Kansas City, Missouri
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ Scientist,
In Boston, Massachusetts

V-12, and similar programs will be
discounted.
8. If both man and wife are Vet-
erans of World War II and the
husband is a Michigan resident
and both are enrolled in the Uni-
versity. their combined applica-
tion will be given special consider-
ation.
9. Each applicant must present
with his application his Military
Record and Report of Separation.
10. In general, apartments will
be assigned in terms of the follow-
ing relative proportions;
60 % undergraduates
231( non-professional graduates
17's professional graduates
These proportions being based
solely upon married veteran en-
rollment.
It should be understood that the
University has assigned. in addi-
tion to the quotas designated for
students, a considerable number
of these apartments to faculty
members who are Veterans of
World War II.

'i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

LL,

Art Cinema League presents
"A super-thriller with psychopathic elements added
for extra xingo ... a masterpiece!" -Winsten, N. Y. POST

-also-
Tom and Jer
Cartoon

. . . in . .

F

.... ..

TOMORROW at 8:30 P.M.
University of Michi an Oratorical Association
1946-47LECTURE COURSE
P resellts1
MARGARET WEBSTER
Distinguished as the Greatest Director of Shakespearean Drana
Today -Noted as an actress and as a successful author
"THE ADVENTURE OF ACTING"

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BUILDING
SUNDAY, MARCH 23, at 3:30 P.M.
Under the auspices of
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ann Arbor, Michigan
You and your friends are cordially invited

J

Tickets $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax
Box Office Opens Today - 10
HILL AUDITORIUM

inc.)
A. 1.

Ii.

1I

L

11

JEANNETTE HAIEN
Author of "RIP VAN WINKLE'S DREAM "
and
RUSSELL LA DUE
Author of "No MORE WITH ME"
1946 IOPWOOD AWARD \WINNERS
will sItor"ravh conies of their books TODAY at 3

FRIDAY NITE ONLY

HELEN & EDDIE
1 HOUR SHOW - 3

PRESENT
HOUR DANCE

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dinners (family style)-5:00-8:00 P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65
418 E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717
THE MAYFLOWER
BREAKFASTS... LUNCHEONS ... DINNERS
Waffles our specialty . . . Better Coffee
307 South Main Street

I-

I

COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00- 9:00 P.M.
Closwd Saturdays 512 East Wililarn

1ViUERTIl

II

P.M.

SI

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11

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