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March 21, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-21

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Y, MARCH 21, 1947

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.............. . .... .

GOPHERS MISS CUE:
M' Bilards Team Wins National Title

By IRV ZUCKER
Surprising even their most rab-
id' admirers, Michigan's shzrp-
shooting pocket billiiards team
edged past highly-favored Mirne-
sota and eight other national con-
tenders Wednesday evening to
capture the National Inter-Col.
legiate Championship.
With each squad performing on
home campuses, Wolverine cue-
mnen amassed 406 points for ten
innings of play at the Michigan
Union, three points ahead of run-
ner-up Minnesota. The Gophers
set an all-time scoring record of
615 points for 15 innings on Feb-
ruary 19 in winning the five sec-
tional playoffs.
Michigan Hits 80% Accu -,acy
Michigan, by virtue of a second-
place rank in the New England
and Eastern Section's opening
competition of pocket billiards,
qualified for national play Wed-
nesday along with nine other lead-
ing clubs. Recording a better than
80,% accuracy range, the, five-man
Wolverine squad gave an artful
exhibition of pool playing.
Mark Abend, Detroit's gifted
billiards ace, once again emerged
as Michigan's high man, this time
with 87 points. Abend, also top
point-producer on the three cush-
ions team, had a high run of 55.
Andy Paton registered an admir-
able 86 mark, followed closely by
Joe Soboleski's 83, Andy Sullivan's
82, and Jim Mummey's 68.
Don Krueger, manager of the
championship combination, attri-
buted the team's success to the
constant practicing at the Union
and the clever shooting at game-
time. "The boys anticipated their
shots well, and seemed to be
ahead of themselves at all times,"
he stated..
On April 15, the National Grand

Championship Invitational will be
held at Purdue University, with
men's singles in pockets, straight
rail, and three-cushions billiards.
In these events, competition will
be on a "personal contact" bas-
is for individual honors.
Wolverines Win Trophy
Michigan will receive from the
Billiards Association of America a
national championship trophy,
which will be retained by the Un-
ion until the next annual tourna-
ment. Members of the pocket
billiards team will be presented
with keys emblematic of partici-
pation with a winning outfit.
Originally 27 colleges and uni-
versities throughout the nation
competed in the pocket billiards
events. Final stanidings' are as
follows: Michigan, Minnesota,
Kentucky, Ohio State, Wisconsin,
Utah, Purdue, Florida, Oklahoma,
and St. Joseph.
Final play-offs in straight rail
and three cushion billiards will be
held this month.
TEED OFF EARLY:
Katzenmeyer
Port 'with Lots

COACH
ER..
mentor.

BERT KATZENMEY-
Michigan's new golf

1 200F
Track Team
Of f Ea)(y for
Purdue Relays
M' Cindermen Seek
Fourth Straight Title
Twenty-three Michigan track-
men will leave at 1:00 p.m. this
afternoon for Lafayette, Indiana,
in quest of their fourth straight
championship in the annual Pur-
due Relays.
Pre-meet performances indicate
that only a repeat of last
year's stunning upset victory can
retain the crown for the Wolver-
ines.
Wolverines Edge Illini in '46
In the 1946 meeting, the Michi-
gan thinclads entered as definite
underdogs to the highly-touted
Illinois, Big Nine champions. In
the biggest upset of the indoor
eason the Wolverines displayed
plenty of spirit and form to edge
the Illini 37 1/3 to 32%.
From the Purdue Relays' inaug-
uration in 1943, Michigan teams
have been dominating the scene
at Lafayette. In that year the
Wolverine's great two-mile relay
team of Johnny Roxborough, Ross
Hume, Dave Matthews and Bob
Ufer established the record of
7:40.9, which has stood for four
years.
'M' Wins First Title in '44
In the following year the track-
men put on their greatest display
of power in collecting 49 points to
win their first title. The Wol-
verines outdistanced second place
Illinois by 16% points in the fol-
lowing year.
Last year's meeting saw Mich-
Igan s great Hume twins, Bob and
Ross lead the distance medley re-
lay quartet to victory in their last
appearance for the Maize and
Blue.
This first place plus the top
spot in the sprint relay were
enough to cinch the title for the
determined thinclads.
Strong in Distance Events
On Saturday the Wolverines
will once more be faced with the
problem of amassing enough
points in the distance events to
edge the powerful Illini.

Slugging Highlights Program
Of Nine Three Round Matcerie
By JERRY ALEXANDER
ICHIGAN'S first All Campus Boxing Tournament got off to a spec-
tacular start last night as an overflow crowd of 1200 spectators
roared their approval at the nine bouts run off in th emain gym of
the Intramural Building.

Sris

See

Steps into Golf
of Experience

Fl asht.

If determination and love of
the sport you coach can spell
success then Bert Katzenmeyer,
youthful golf mentor, is in for
a very rosy first year at Michigan.
Katzenmeyer's life, by his own
admission, "has been and will con-
tinue to be wrapped up in golf."
He started swinging his clubs at
the very early age of seven and
has played regularly for 22 of
his 29 years.
He is turning pro for the first
time now, as his new job means
he can no longer compete as an
amateur. But he does not ex-
pect to compete as a pro since
he has "neither the tempera-
ment nor the game for the big
time."
Instead, he stated, in a recent
interview, "I'm primarily concern-
ed with developing boys who show
an interest in golf and I shall
give all my time to those men who
want to play the game. I want
to see golf take its deserved place
in sports."
Katzenmeyer has played plenty
of golf and is still as enthusiastic
about it as he ever was. He play-
ed for Ann Arbor High from 1934
through 1937 'and led the Pioneers

First

I-itt

to the Grand Rapids Country Club
title in 1936. During that year he
captained and was number 1 man
on the championship squad.
He learned the golf game from
top to '1ottom in his early years,
starting as a caddy at the Huron
Hills, and both the old and new
University courses. He learned
greenskeeping under the venerable
Bill Slack, present greenskeeper
at the University Course.
lle played on the Scott Field
golf team in 1945, teaming withI
Pat Abbott, duration amateur
champ. Discharge came along
in February of 1946 and he took
a job as assistant to Bill Bar-
clay, former Maize and Blue
golf coach. In the fall he join-
ed the teaching staff of Ohio
State, and a little over a week
ago took over the reins of the
Wolverine link squad.
Katzenmeyer is studying for his
Master's degree in physical edu-
cation which is expected in June,
and after that he hopes to spend
"as much time as possible in
coaching."

The fights had everything,
ranging from toe to toe slug-
ging to superior displays of box-
ing skill and finesse. The fight-
ers gave everything they had
and most of the fights ended
with both contestants just about
out on their feet.
Dick Kuder and Joe Stone at
127 pounds opened the card with
a real display of slugging. Stone
started the second round with
some comical antics reminiscent
of Maxies Baer but Kuder fighting
a cagy bout against his aggress-
ive foe soon took the offensive
and went on to win easily 90-58.
In the 135-pound class Morrie
Koblanz and Milt Higgs kept
things humming as they set a
fast pace for the three round bout.
Koblanz kept moving in continu-
ously connecting with rights and
lefts to the head, as Higgs, dis-
playing good form, countered
heavy and often. At the bell both
fighters were slugging it out al-
though neither had the strength
to put the other away for the
count. Higgs was the winner in
a close split decision 90-81.
At 145 pounds Bob Harrison
won a unanimous decision from
John Thoriault as he displayed
beautiful boxing form in keep-
ing Theriault in hand all the
way. Using a sweet left jab
he continuously kept his foe on
the defensive and in the third
round had Theriault on the
ropes but the latter refused to
drop and, stayed the limit.
.Jack Keeler and Chuck Tower
got off to a fast start in the 145
pound clash. Despite two rounds
of slugging the pace actually pick-
ed up in the last round as each
fighter poured it on. At the fin-
al bell the points were knotted
and as Intercollegiate rules for-
bid ties the referee had to make a
choice and Keeler got the nod.
In the 155 pound division Don
Ayers proved too much for Andy
Kerr. Kerr continually moved in
as Ayers retaliated with a heavy
body attack to win 90-53.
Bill Muha outclassed Jack
Hallberg in another 155 pound

bout as Muha used his longer
reach to good advantage. Hall-
berg kept on throwing leather
but Muha's defense wti~s too
tight as the latter went on to
take a decision 87-77.
In the lightheavies, it was again
a case of boxing skill as Linus
Litsey outpointed Herb Furman
90-58. Litsey, a former Golden
Glove competitor used a left hook
throughout and didn't let Furman
throw his right.
At the same weight, Mark
Abend scored a victory over his
taller opponent Carl Roth. Abend
used a powerful left hook that had
Roth groggy but hanging on at
final bell.
The heavyweight bout proved
a fitting climax to the evening's
card. Dick Kempthorn and Al
.Jackson came out slugging and
stood toe to toe for the three
rounds. At the end, both fighters
were bloody from the terrific pace
and were so absorbed in the slug-
fest neither heard the bell. Kemp-
thorn was given the nod 85-8L in
i split decision.
Candidates for Spring foot-
ball should report any daynext
week at Yost Field house to
draw equipment for practice
which will begin March 31.
H j 1
"All said ws-Apenny for your thoughts and he rehed
up and tave nie a Pro-Smoked Dr. Grabow pipee'

r

(Editor's Note:
gram arrived at
late last night.

This tele-
the Daily

SKIING REPORTED EX-
CELLENT THIS WEEKEND
AT CABERFAE, CADILLAC,
MICHIGAN WITH AVERAGE
SNOW DEPTH 18 INCHES
STOP ONLY LOWER MICHI-
GAN AREA OPEN STOP ALL
SKIERS WELCOME.
CABERFAE SKI CLUB

Hold Those War

B ond(s

r

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

60att,

t a t
i ' t
r
r

4'

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(Continued from Page 2)

i

IN PERFORMANCE
* . .AND APPEARANCE
of the bind you have become accl(s-
tomed to expect from iRadio-Phono-
graphs hearing these fam ous naries--

ning and night by calling Ypsi-
lanti 3120 and asking for the Uni-
versity physician.
Customary Health Service fees
are charged.
When'medical services are need-
ed at Willow Village. the follow-
ing resources are available:
A. Physicians
a. For University of Michigan
students only: In cases of emer-
gency, call Ypsilanti 30 and ask
to be connected with tie Univer-
sity doctor living on the project.
If he cannot be reached, call the
SSHAVES
YOU for
3 months.!

ANSLEY
FREED-EISEMANN

RCA VICTOR
MEISSNER

I1

STROMBE RG-CARLSON
We now have viodels of each available for
immediate delivery
See and hear thein at the
MUSIC SHOP)1
Operated by Musicians for Music-Lovers
205 East Liberty Street Phone 2-0675

Health Service, Ann Arbor 2-4531.
Customary Health Service fees will
be charged.
b. For the community: The fol-
lowing will make house calls at
Willow Run Village. Customary
fees will be charged for services of
these physicians.
Dr. Harold D. Barss, surgeon,
133 W. Michigan, 456-W, 456-R.
Dr. Thomas J. Bass, 608 Arm-
strong, 2951-W, 2951-R.
Dr. Richard H. Baugh, 32 N.
Washington, 450-W, 450-R.
Dr. L. W. Frost, 32 N. Washing-
ton, 2784-W. 2784-R.
Dr. Bradley M. Harris, 220 Pearl
Street, 2106-W, 1288-R.
Dr. Donald W. Martin, 11 Sav-
ings Bank Bldg., 981-W, 981-R.'
Dr. Albert F. Milford, 32 N.
Washington, 520-W, 520-R.
Dr. Marcia Potter, 318 W. Cross
Street, 106-W, 106-R.
Dr. George S. Sayre, 220 Pearl
Street, 2106-W, 2106-R.
Dr. Reuben I. Seime, 302 W.
Cross Street, 212-M, 121-J.
Dr. H. A. Scovill, 107 Washte-
naw Avenue. 3352-W, 3352-R.
Dr. C. W. Spears, 23 N. Wash-
ington, 505-W, 505-R.
Dr. Frederick B. Williamson, 319
W. Michigan, 1226-W, 1226-R.
Dr. J. J. Woods, 19 N. Washing-
ton Street, 1346, 168.
Dr. Melissa H. Worth, allergy,
15 N. Adams Street, 494, 2-3815
Ann Arbor.
Dr. W. J. Wright, 133 W. Mich-
igan, 890-W. 890-R.

(The first number following the
above names is the office phone,
the second the home phone.)
B. Ambulance Service
a. For University of Michigan
students only: Call Health Ser-
vice, Ann Arbor 2-4531. No charge
is made to students for this ser-
vice in emergency cases; a charge
of $8.00 is made for non-emer-
gency calls.
b. For the comm'unity: Call Wil-
low Village 3120, Extension 15. A
fee is charged for this ambulance
service.
Attention Engineers-Mechani-
cal, metallurgical, chemical, elec-
trical, civil, and industrial: Any
men graduating in June who are
interested in the Bethlehem Steel
Company, Inc. are asked to call
immediately at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 201 Mason Hall for
further information.

No Breaking in
No Bite
No Bitter Taste
,p, c89ed-00
. 8:350
° $ X00
Fashioned by Lnkman
DR. GRABOW PIPE CO. INC., CHICAGO 14, L.

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GUARANUEED BY
.E MARLIN FIREARMS COMPANY
Fine Guns Since 1870
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mmmwmmlmmm

8th ANNIVERSARY

SALE

For This Sale We Have Listed
Just a Few of the Items Offered:

I*

White Shirts
Sanforized Shrunk
All sizes and Sleeve
Lengths
2.99
Long Loather, Or

Briefs
Elastic all around
59c
3 for 1.75
Regular 79c Value
Famousmake
T CLs

13.95 Value
All Wool Slacks
Herringbone Tweeds
One Price
7.95
White
T-Shirts
First Oualitv

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11

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MKUIIVu'AILLI

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