100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 15, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1947

Candidates' Statements
The following platform and ,j ,.,r . " ,,..

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

statements were submitted by
candidates running for the Stu-
dent Legislature on the Represen-
tative Party. Statements of re-
maining candidates will appear
tomorrow:
Party Platform .,..
We are a Representative Party
of affiliated and independent stu-
dents with the goal of stimulating
the Student Legislature and with
the purpose of achieving action.
We have decided to run as a party
to insure representation of the
campus as a whole and respon-
sibility as a group to the platform
that we have formulated.
In order to insure this respon-
sibility, the Representative Party
will initiate a plan to publicize
the individual voting and atten-
dance records. To further inform
the student of legislative activities
we intend to have published an
iafrmative record including com-
niittee reports and minutes of
the meetings.
In addition, the Representative
Party plans the publication of a
comprehensive report of the func-
tion, structure and powers of
the Student Legislature.
The Representative Party ad-
vocates greater student partici-
pation in legislative affairs by
campus-wide initiation of legis-
lation and by publicizing the
open-meeting policy of the gov-
erning group and its associated
committees. Finally, the Repre-
sentative Party also believes in
an enlarged student Book Ex-
change and an expansion of social
facilities.
James Risk ...
Student Legislature needs peo-
ple who have both time and en-
ergy to give student affairs. I
firmly believe the Legislature can
become more active and I shall
devote my energy to that end.
Ir

-jTeorge pvu u *

t
I

' ' Ptant mlevy .

Y

Experience and knowledge of
campus affairs is essential to a
good Legislator. As a member of
Student Federalists, the "M"
Club. Sphinx and formerly of
SRA, I believe I have obtained
the necessary background.
Anthony Spda ...
A senior in the industrial-
mechanical department of the
engineering college, I am familiar
with most campus problems. I
am interested in the Student
Legislature and will be able to
contribute all my time to. this
activity.
Penny Klausner ...
I am well acquainted with the
workings of the campus and
campus personnel. I am a junior
and have served on the central
committees of three League pro-
jects: sophomore project, Casbah,
and Junior Girls' Play.
Edward McKinlay...
I have participated in various
student activities here and at the
college I previously attended. I
feel that I -am well qualified for
the position and am willing to
work for the good of the entire
student body.
*- $ *
Richard Eichb .uer...
I am an engineer living at Wil-
low Village. I am also an active
member of the AVC chapter there
and am now on the executive
council of that organization.
Roger Roemisch .. .
I am a second semester fresh-
mand and was social chairman of
Williams House this past sem-
ester,
' ' * 4
Chuck Lewis .. *
Qualifications: Sports night ed-
itor of The Daily; J-Hop Com-
mittee; Inter-fraternity Council
staff; IFC Ball central committee
two years; Alpha Phi Omega,
treasurer, four semesters, secre-
tary, one.
Stuart Rankin . ..
I strongly believe that above
all else, the student body should
be informed of all proceedingsl
and the attendance of the Stu-
dent Legislature. I would doa
everything possible to carry thist
through.
* *
Barbara Newman . . .
I know student needs. I am

Qualifications, publicity chair-
man for the Inter-Racial Associa-
tion and the Student Town Hall
Committee; member of the soph
staff of The Daily 1945-46; Edi-
tor-in-chief, Hillel News.
$ * *
Dulcie Kirasnick . . .
I have participated actively in
previous student elections, class
projects, League committees, As-
sembly projects. Am a soph aide
on Women's Judiciary, member
of IZFA and on Daily and Gar-
goyle staffs.
Ellen Mulvihill ...
Because of my work as sopho-
more president of Mosher Hall, on
the editorial staff of The Daily
and the Famine Committee, I feel
that I am qualified to undertake
the responsibilities of a Student
Legislature member.
John MacRitchie, also a mem-
ber of the Representative Party,
did not submit a statement.
U' Case Club
Calls Limiting
Contract Legal
Three black-robed justices of
the State Supreme Court of X
State sat in solemn session last
night and declared that covenants
between property owners denying
the sale of real estate to members
of certain races should be en-
forced.
In the mythical case of "Jones
vs. Lee" a Case Club court decided
that a contract between a prop-
erty owner and his neighbor had
been violated when the owner
broke the covenant in selling real
estate to "Lee," a member of the
Oriental race. The court upheld
the right of the neighbors to en-
join "Lee" from occupancy and to
set aside the deed of sale.
In making the decision, the
court, composed of student Jus-
tice John Huston and R. O. Han-
cix and faculty advisor Prof. Paul
G. Kauper, stated the view that
consideration of public policy op-
posting restrictive covenants be-
cause of the housing shortage
must first be expressed by action
of the state legislature.
"Although the decision of the
U. S. Supreme Court in the case of'
Swing vs. AFofL defines State ac-
tion as any action of the state
courts, it has still not been ex-
tended to include the indirect dis-
crimination that may be involved
when a state approves the en-
forcement of a restrictive cove-
nant as a legalacontract," Hancox
said.
Furniture Arrives
As Owner Leaves
TORONTO, Ont., March 14-(P)
-Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Everett
came to Toronto six years ago
from Switzerland.
He is in the U.S. diplomatic
service and was assigned to Tor-
onto as consul. But in wartime
that didn't help him get his furni-
ture to Canada.
The Everetts' furniture finally
arrived last week.
This week the Everetts will re-
turn to his old post in Switzer-
land.
Sailing Club Elections
Officers elected by therSailing
Club for the season are Bob
Schroder, commodore; Bob Ford,
vice-commodore; Larry Ward,
racing committee chairman; Bruce

Lockwood, fleet captain; Marilee
Diamond, secretary; and Marty
Cranston, treasurer.

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the offfice of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
'n~1 "al by *-f n' n h n

displayed at the Student Book Ex-
change in the Women's League
starting 12:30 until 5:30 p.m. each
day until further notice.

BRITISH BARRACKS BLASTED - A hole is torn in stone wall
around damaged British army pay corps barracks in Jerusalem,I
Palestine, following explosions set off in pre-dawn raid (Marchj
12). British authorities said the hole was blasted by a party ofy
"Jewish raiders" who stormed the building under cover of machine
gun fire to touch off four explosions. Barracks is a converted
Syrian orphanage.

nSeu ail.,oy nvvp.m... n L'na The U. of M. Health Service
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat- pyiinlvn tWlo u
urda ys).physician lvig at Willow Run
Village is Dr. F. G. Ziobrowski,
S.11626 Monson Court, who can be
SATURDAY. MARCh 15, 1947 reached by University students in
VOL. LVII, No. 114 case of emergency during the eve-
ning and night by calling Ypsi-
Noices lanti 3120 and asking for the Uni-
Customary Health Service fees
L S & A Freshman Five-Week versity physician.
Progress Reports will be given out are charged.
in the office of the Academic
Counselors, 108 Mason Hall, in the When medical services are need-
Coloneor,18e aonHllrn:h ed at Willow Village. the follow-
following order: igrsucsaeaalbe
March 19, Wednesday, R thru ing resources arc available:
Z. A. Physicians
March 20, Thursday, K thru Q. a. For University of Michigan
March 21, Friday, D thru J. students only: In cases of emer-
March 22. Saturday, A thru C. gency, call Ypsilanti 3120 and ask
to be connected with the Univer-
College of Engineering: Senior sity doctor living on the project.
Engineers who expect to graduate If he cannot be reached, call the
in June 1947, should fill out the Health Service, Ann Arbor 2-4531.
blank for diploma applications in Customary Health Service fees will
the Secretary's Office; Rm. 263, W. be charged.
Engineering Bldg., at once. b. For the community: The fol-
lowing will make house calls at
Choral Union Ushers: Report at Willow Run Village. Customary
6:15 p.m.. Sunday for the Chicago fees will be charged for services of
Symphony Concert. these physicians.
Dr. Harold D. Barss, surgeon,
A graduate student interested in 133 W. Michigan, 456-W, 456-R.
working on a research project in Dr.' Thomas J. Bass, 608 Arm-
fluid dynamics who can work ap- strong,- 2951-W, 2951-R.
proximately thirty hours a week, Dr. Richard H. Baugh, 32 N.
please see Prof. R. A. Dodge, Rm. Washington, 450-W, 450-R.
411-A, W. Engineering Bldg. Dr. L. W. Frost, 32 N. Washing-
ton, 2784-W. 2784-R.
Assembly Ball Pictures: Now Dr. Bradley M. Harris, 220 Pearl
Street, 2106-W, 1288-R.
Caribbean Corals DV. Donald W. Martin, 11 Sav-
ings Bank Bldg., 981-W, 981-R.
Are Shown Here Dr. Albert F. Milford, 32 N. Wash-
ington, 520-W, 520-Rl.
Dr. Marcia Potter, 318 W. Cross
Reef coral of many varieties Street, 106-W, 106-R.
from the Caribbean Sea area are Dr. George S. Sayre, 220 Pearl
on display in a case study recent- Street, 2106-W, 2106-R.
ly erected in the Hall of Biologi- Dr. Reuben I. Seime, 302 W.
cal Principles of the Museum. Cross Street, 212-M, 121-J.
Taxidermist Robert Butch pre- Dr. H. A. Scovill, 107 Washte-
pared the study and arranged the naw Avenue. 3352-W, 3352-R.
many coral types as they might Dr. C. W. Spears, 23 N. Wash-
appear on the ocean floor. He - - ---_-_-_--
pointed out that these animals
play an important role in land
building. UEUTH
f11171? 1DOYCIV

I

HIGHLIGHTS ON CAMPUS

ington, 505-W, 505-R.
Dr. Frederick B. Williamson, 319
W. Michigan, 1226-W, 1226-R.
Dr. J. J. Woods, 19 N. Washing-
ton Street, 1346, 168.
Dr. Melissa H. Worth, allergy,
15 N. Adams Street, 494, 2-3815
Ann Arbor.
Dr. W. J. Wright, 133 W. Mich-
igan, 890-W. 890-R.
(The first number following the
above names is the office phone,
the second the home phone.)
B. Ambulance Service
a. For University of Michigan
students only: Call Health Ser-
vice, Ann Arbor 2-4531. No charge
is made to students for this ser-
vice in emergency cases; a charge
of $8.00 is made for non-emer-
gency calls.
(Coninued on Page 4)
MICHIGAN
Running Continuously
Thru Supper Hour
All Week
35c until 5 P.M.
ONE OF THE
GREAT MUSICAL
EVENTS IN
MOTION PICTURES!
JUNE AlLYSON
LUCILLE BREMER
k UDY GARL AND
r/ .. ATHRYN GRAYSON
f' VAN HEFLIN
ANJEROHNSON
DINAH SHORE
FRANK.ISINATRA
A r
Cr Ca Lo

A
i

a,'A

4

II

11

I'

Light Lunches
.SOUPS
.. SALADS
... SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.Mi
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

a League House president, was
member of a student-faculty dis-
cussion group, and worked on
Soph Cabaret, Ensiah, Student
Directory and Book Exchange.

Vocal Prog[ram .
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen, of
the music school, will present a
song recital at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
His program, which will includeI
selections by Schumann, Handel,
Sarti, Carissimi, Massenet, and
Martin will be open to the general
public.I
Piano Rcital.. .
Joanne Johnson Baker, music
school student will present a
piano recital at 8:30 p.m. Mon-
day at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
A Beethoven sonata will high-
light the program which will
also include compositions by
Bach, Ravel and a suite for
piano written by Miss Baker.
The program will be open to
the public.
Christian Science .,.
"Christian Science: Its Godli-
ness and Grandeur" will be the ti-
tle of 'a lecture to be delivered by'
Oscar Graham Peake at 3:30 p.m.
March 23 in Lydia Mendelssohn
'Theatre.
Peake comes from Kansas City,
Missouri, and is a member of the
Board of Lectureship of The Moth-
er Church, The First Church of
Christ, Scientist, in Boston.
Chinese Students ..-
Paul T. K. Lin, general secre-
retary of the Chinese Students
Christian Association in North
America, will speak on "Two
Way Opportunity of the Chinese
Students in America" at 3 p.m.
today at Lane Hall.
International Dinner . .
Supper will be served to for-
eign students and friends at 6
p.m.atomorrow in the Interna-
tional Center.
Tickets will be on sale until
noon today in the Center office.
There will be no program fol-
lowing supper because of the
Choral Union Concert,

Line Hall SoCial ...
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will have a box social at 8
p.m. today at Lane Hall.
There will be games and an auc-
tion of the lunches provided by
the women.
Welfare Head
Predicts More
Relief Cases
LANSING, March 14- eP-Ris-
ing public assistance case loads
and costs in the next few years
were predicted by Carlton Runci-
man of Lowell, chairman of the
State Social Welfare Commission,
in a report to Governor Sigler to-
day.
Runciman said the current load
of 92,000 old age assistance cases
may reach as high as 103,000, and
the current 19,000 aid-to-depend-
ent children cases, which includes
45,000 children, may reach a peak
of 21,000 cases. He did not pre-
diet a specific increase for the
direct relief load which stands at
23,000 cases.
W. G. Maxey, new welfare di-
rector, told the Governor if the
$11,000,000 deficiency bill now in
the House of Representatives is
not passed by March 20, "45,000
children and 19,000 mothers will
be without bread and butter in
April and thereafter."
Nicaragua did 52 per cent of her
foreign trade with the United
States in 1932. In recent years be-
tween 80 and 90 per cent of her
foreign trade has been with the
United States.
Continuous from1 P.M.
- Last Times Today -
S S
Dnna RM)
uviri LiONE:L BARBRYMORE
Starts Sunday

North Main Opposite Court House
-- Starts Today --
ARTHUR LAKE in
"BLONDIE KNOWS BEST"
-plus-
GERALD MOHR in
"LONE WOLF IN MEXICO"
New Serial, Chap. 1
"JUNGLE GIRL"

OUR PRICE
Weekdays until 5 P.M., 25c
Evenings and Sundays, 30c
-- Last Day Today
"SUSPENSE"
with Belita
-- and --
"ROMANCE OF TIIE WEST"
in color
--Sunday and Monday--
"THREE WISE FOOLS"
with Margaret O'brien
and
"THE FALCON'S ALIBI

4

®1

P~

7

For that
Delicious Midnight Snack
Try
Miller's Box Lunch
Golden Brown Chicken
or Fried Jumbo Shrimp
Home-made Rolls and Individual Pies
Call 2-7171
We Deliver Anywhere, Anytime

- - - ,. ~ ~ .0-- - . A- '- r -

i
. __ !

A

J

-.t AL

c

;_ y
i
i
i
I
f
i
4

(&

r

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phom, 9387
HOME OF GOOD FOOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - only 65c
Dinners (family style)-5:00-8:00 P.M.-$1.45 to $1.65
418 E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717
TIlE MAYFLOWER
BREAKFASTS... LUNCHEONS ... DINNERS
Waffles our specialty . . . Better Coffee
307 South Main Street

11

t

Mli/I won''t ever 6e hotter
than 9ndayIjlif A
Jtapch 214t
at 7.0O and 945 ptm.
...:Nl3C/- SCCK/ .

COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M.- 1:30 P.M., 5:00.4 8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.

i

III

.. ..

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan