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June 11, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1946

PAGE TWO TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1946
U U

Vets' Suggestions for Changes
At 'U' Revealed by Daily Poll

(Continued from Page 1)
two felt that there was "too much
juvenilism" in the social life of the
University.
Three veterans complained that
there is nothing to do on Sundays.
One suggested "more things like
May Festival," one was in favor
of disbanding fraternities and one
found the social atmosphere of the
University "unfriendly."
Twenty-six married veterans an-
swered questions concerning their
wives. Five of them felt there was
nothing more that the University
could do for wives of veterans. Two
suggested better housing and two
recommended evening bus service.
One veteran each suggested that
there be baby sitters at Willow Run,
a nursery school, women's clubs and
better treatment for veterans' wives
who are employed by the University.
In answer to questions regarding

counseling needs, 18 of the 100
veterans suggested the need for
more academic advisers and twelve
the need for more guidance service
to help with occupational plans and
general problems. Eight of the
veterans felt that vocational guid-
ance facilities are insufficiently
publicized, four others declaring
that more vocational information
should be made available. That aca-
demic advisers be specially trained
was suggested by four of the vet-
erans.
These suggestions refer only to
specific recommendations made by
the veterans, many of whom did not
have specific suggestions concern-
ing teaching and curriculum. Com-
ments on University women were
made by only 69 of the 100 veterans,
while only 14 of the 26 married vet-
erans had suggestions to make re-
garding their wives.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Brown pocket picture folder
containing Social Security ,I.,
pictures and eligibility card. Lost
Sat. night somewhere in Ann Ar-
bor. Desperately needed. Call Ann
Maidanick, 7330.
LOST: Silver identification bracelet.
"Burton A. Kolb" engraved on
plate. Finder please notify Burton
Kolb, 1357 Erving Ct., Willow Run.
Reward.
LOST: Chi Omega pin, name Joan
Schlee on back. Reward. Call Jo
479 Jordan, 2-4561.
LOST: "Rainfair" brand tan rain-
coat at Union. Call Gene at 2-4551.
Reward for return.
LOST: 3-strand pearl bracelet after
Senior Ball. Jefferson near May-
nard. Call 5838. Reward. (16
LOST: Black and gold Shaeffer pen.
Initials "E.L.S.". Reward. Please
call Enid, 7672. (11
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Single room for busi-
ness woman or graduate student
in private home with two other
women. Breakfast privileges. Ph.
3958. (19
FOR SALE
WHITE FORMAL JACKET (36) $5.
Tailcoat (36) and trousers (30-31)
$15: Also 2 white silk scarves; 2
dress shirts (14-32); 2 flannel
summer slacks, $4 each; 2 fancy
sport shorts (30); slack suit (30).
214 S. Ingalls, 2-7449.
NAVY MEN: Officer's grey (sumner)
blouse for sale. Size 36. Worn only
once. $5. Also grey cap cover (7)
and blue wool overseas cap (7%).
214 S. Ingalls. 2-7449.
FOR SALE: Suit, 39L, 2 button.
double breasted, light blue covert.
Jack Lawson, Psi U House, 1000
Hill. (18
WILL SELL A.B. Cap and Gown. Call
8024 mornings. For $9 plus price of
ad. (13

FOR SALE: Knee-hole study desk.
Reasonable. 1615 E. Stadium. Ph.
5651.
HELP WANTED
PART TIME WORK: Male or female.
Evenings and weekends. Dining
room and other work. Barton Hills
Country Club. Phone 8656. (7
MEN for part time work on farm.,
preferably with farm background
and experience. Laboratory orch-
ard, 1831 Traver Road. Phone 8023.
(10
WANTED TO RENT
HIGHEST PRICE! Paid for a one or
two bed room furnished apartment.
Lease of two or more years re-
quired. Occupancy at earliest con-
venience. Best references. Care
given property. Call Kashmiry 2-
5553. (28
A RECORD! Up to $250 per month
for a furnished house up to 6 (min-
imum of 4 required) bed rooms.
Wanted by a family at earliest
convenience for a lease of more
than 2 years. No children. Best
references. Call A. Aly, 2-5553. (1
wWANTED
WANTED: Girls to room in sorority
house for summer session. 722
Forest, 2-2539.
GRADUATE will pay for ride to
Charlevoix or Petoskey, Michigan,
June 21, 22, 23. Call Rabel, 2-
4028. (17
TRANSPORTATION WANTED: To
Washington or Oregon. Will share
expenses. Any time after June 15.
Call Margeson ft 2-4603. (20
WANTED: Driving to Seattle, Wash-
ington, June 23. Two students to
help drive and share expense. Ref-
erences exchanged. Phone 8794. (12
WANTED: Girl's bicycle with shift,
in good condition. July or sooner.
Call 3185. (3
WANTED: Either Bolex H-16, Filmo
Sportster, or B&H Aristocrat. Pay
top price. Other makes considered.
Call 8156. (8
MISCELLANEOUS
MEN'S Used Clothing'Wanted. Best
prices paid. Sam's Store, 122 East
Washington.
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING TO TEXAS: June 20. Pas-
senger wanted to share expenses
and driving. Phone 6748.
DRIVING TO MILWAUKEE: June
. 21. Passengers wanted to share ex-
penses. Phone Ypsilanti, 3582-J2.

Brown Assails
GOP Nominees
For Governor
Democratic Affiliation
Charged to Kim Sigler
Lt. Gov. Vernon J. Brown, one of
the four candidates for the-Republi-
can nomination for governor, blasted
his three opponents last night in a
prepared address delivered at the Ma-
sonic Temple.
Speaking at a dinner in his honor,
sponsored by the county Brown-for-
governor committee, Brown asserted
that the present administration was
nominated by the rank and file in
an unbossed convention. Singling out
his opponents, Brown charged them
bluntly with inability to execute the
office of governor.
"One is a long-time Democrat re-
cently converted. One never had any
political affiliation. The third has
been too busy until now to take any
part in party affairs. He is a hitch-
hiker who now insists on taking the
wheel."
Brown charged one candidate "was
corporation counsel for the notorious
Dick Reading city hall gang that
took everything but the Detroit River
a few years ago." Another, he said,-
"having remained an unbeliever all-
these years, he now suddenly gets
party religious and already wants the
job of being the bishop.
The third, Brown said, was Demo-
cratic prosecutor of Barry County
25 years ago, was prominent in-
State Democratic circles later, and
in 1928 ran on the Democratic ticket
for attorney general. "Now we find
him wanting to be our Republican
nominee for governor. There isn't
anything about the present Republi-
can Party or any of its doings he
likes - he has said so emphatically
many times. Still he wants to be
the chief of our tribe."
U' Receives
Editor's Praise
(Continued from Page 1)
port as higher education approaches
a five-year perioduof misunderstand-
ing due in part to the inevitable dis-
appointment and disillusion of the
overcrowded years ahead," Avirett
said. "There is an earnest desire here
to have the actual work of the Uni-
versity interpreted without bally-hoo
so that the public can make up its
mind with adequate information."
The cooperation of the press and
radio is essential if the facts are to
reach the general public, he pointed
out. Irresponsible journalism has no
place in this serious undertaking.
In the New York press, according
to Avirett, there is a growing interest
in both news and editorial comment
on education, and this interest is
shared increasingly by the news ma-
gazines. This is not a nation-wide
trend as yet, he emphasized, but in-
evitably the public need for respon-
sible interpretation of educational
news will increase the amount of
space devoted, both in the news and
editorial columns.
The greatest difficulty, he added,
is that careful interpretation of edu-
cational policies and developments is
not yet news in the strictest sense of
the word.
Local Church Group
Sends Food Abroad
The Canterbury Club collection of
food for European relief has netted
a total of more than 1300 cans of
food, it was announced yesterday.
The cans have been collected from
members of the club, the student or-

ganization of St. Andrew's Episcopal
Church, and in dormitories and sor-
ority and fraternity houses. They will
be shipped to Europe in the near
future.
The collection was presented at
the altar of St. Andrew's Church at
the 11 a.m. service Sunday.
A contribution of $300 was made to
the campus famine relief drive by
the Lawyers' Club as a result of a
plea made before that club by one of
the Episcopal students.

._._ .

MILTARY POLICEMEN GUARD A DISPLAY OF JEWELS in Washington, which are part of the $1,500,-
000 loot taken from the Kronberg Castle in Germany. Left to right: Ist Lt. P. J. Smith, Charleston, S.C.;
Pfc. Robert J. Karmazie, Lawrence Neb.; Cpl. Robert K. Huber, Greencastle, Ind.; Lt. Col. Ralph W. Pierce,
Washington, chief of the Provost Marshal's criminal investigation branch; Maj. John Salb, Cheverly, Md.;
and Cpl. Hugh Blaize, Petersburgh, Ind.

Top Executive
Slain in Boston
Business Off ice
Slayer Nonchalantly
Walks to Freedom
BOSTON, June 10-UP)-William
A. Whitcomb, 73, wealthy president
of the Great Northern Paper Com-
pany, was slain today in a downtown
bank building by a well-dressed gun-
man who nonchalantly walked down
eight flights with briefcase under
arm to escape in busy street crowds.
Whitcomb was found lying face
downward in his private office on the
eighth floor of the Boston Safety
Deposit and Trust Company building
in the heart of the business district
with three bullets in his body.
Absence of Motive
Detectives, admittedly baffled in
the absence of a motive, studied an
unsigned contract involving $25,000
that lay on Whitcomb's desk in hope
that it might lead to a clue to the
killer, who posed as a government
Treasury Agent.
A dozen secretaries and other com-
pany executives in an outer office
saw the slayer calmly emerge from
Whitcomb's office with gun still in
hand and walk out. They were so
stunned that before an alarm could
be sounded he had disappeared. No
weapon was found.
Slayer Described
The slayer was described as between
40 and 45 years, wearing a grey suit
and panama hat.
Giving his name as "Mr. Homan
from the Treasury Department," the
gunman easily gained admittance
to the paper manufacturer's private
office and was there only about seven
minutes.
First indication that something was
wrong came when the slayer walked
out of Whitcomb's office with gun
openly in hand, Police Supt. Edward
W. Fallon said.

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

rublication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 161
Notices
Plans for Commencement: Com-
mencement, Saturday, June 22, 6:00
p.m.
Weather Fair
Time of Assembly: 4:55 p.m. (ex-
cept noted)
Places of Assembly:
Members of the Faculties at 5:00
p.m. in Angell Hall, Room 1223.
Rhetoric Library, where they may
robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, and Deans
at 5:00 p.m. in Angell Hall, Room
1011, the Regents' Room.
Students of the various schools
and colleges, as follows:
Literature, Science and the Arts
on Main Diagonal walk between
Library and Engineering Build-
ings.
Education on walk in front of
Physiology and Pharmacology
Building.
Engineering on Main Diagonal
in Engineering Court.
Architecture on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Arch ,behind
Engineers).
Nurses on diagonal walk between
Chemistry Building and Library.
Law on East and West walk, west
of the intersection in front of
Library.
Pharmacy on East and West
walk, west of the intersection in
front of the Library (behind Law).
Dental Surgery on North and
South walk between Library and
Natural Science Building.
Business Administration on walk
north side of Physiology and Phar-
macology Building.
Forestry and Conservation on
walk north side of Physiology and
Pharmacology Building (behind
Bus. Admn.).
Music on Diagonal walk from
Library to Alumni Memorial Hall,
near Library.
Public Health on Diagonal walk
from Library to Alumni Memorial
Hall (behind Music).
PRIN TING
PROGRAMS . CARDS STATIONERY
HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NORTH MAIN
ATHENS PRESS

Graduate on East and West walk
walk west of Library entrance.
Honor Guard at Waterman Gym-
nasium.
Line of March: State Street to
Ferry Field.
Weather Rainy
The sounding of the University
Power House Siren at 4:45 to 4:55
will indicate that the march to Ferry
Field has been abandoned.
Student will proceed directly to
the Field House and enter through
the South doors.
Members of the Faculties will enter
through the North doors and take
their places on the platform in the
Field House.
Regents, Ex-Regents,; Deans and
Candidates for Honorary Degrees will
assemble in Room 1011 Angell Hall
at 5:30 p.m.
Glenn L. Alt,
Chief Marshall
Tickets for Graduation Exercises:
Entrance tickets to Ferry Field and
Yost Field House for the graduation
exercises on June 22 are ready for
distribution. Please apply at the In-
formation Desk, in the Business Of-
fice, Room 1, University Hall. Those
eligible to receive tickets will please
present their identification cards.
For Ferry Field a reasonable num-
ber of tickets to each graduate will
be available; to Yost Field House,
however, owing to lack of space, three
only can be provided.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules pass-
ed by the Regents at their meeting
of February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes each senester or
Summer Session. Student , loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the close of
business on the last day of classes
will be reported to the Cashier of
the University and;
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or Summer Session just completed

will not be released, and no transcript
of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or Sum-
mer Session until payment has been
made."
Herbert G. Watkins,
Secretary

School of Business Administration:
A convocation for students and fac-
ulty of the, School will be held on
Wednesday, June 12 at 11:30 a.m.,
in the West Gallery, Alumni Hall.
Library Ilours: The General Li-
brary will be open from 8:00 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. June 19-30.except that
on June 22, Commencement Day, it
will close at 5:00 p.m. The first floor
Study Hall will be open from 9-12
a.m. and 1-5 p.m.
The Basement Study Hall and the
Graduate Reading Rooms will be
closed completely June 20-26 and
will reopen on short schedules June
27-29.
The Divisional Libraries will be
closed June 20-26, with the exception
of the Dentistry, Physics, and the
two Engineering Libraries. Sched-
ules will be pasted on the doors.
Notice to Students in the Summer
Session Regarding Library Books:
Students who have in their posses-
sion books drawn from the General
Library and its branches are notified
that such books are due Saturday,
June 15.
The names of all students who
(Continued on Page 4)

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ENDS TONIGHT
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