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November 03, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TilE MICHIGAN fAIL

FRIDAY, NOT. 3, 19.

of. Newcomb
Open Hillel
iks Tonight

Five Students Will Fill Top Positions on The Michigan Daily

Speaking on "Politics and Propa-
,nda," Prof. Theodore Newcomb,
cently returned from working with
e OWL, will open the weekly series
talks and discussions which will
low Friday night services at the
nai Brith Hillel Foundation this
11 at 8:30 p.m. today in the Foun-
tion Auditorium.
Prof. Newcomb, before leaving the
ciology department for the Office
War Information, spent six years
aching sociology at Bennington
amen's College, Vt.
Preceding Prof. Newcomb's talk
d beginning at 7:45 p.m., religious
rvices in Hebrew and English will
conducted by Rabbi Jehudah M.
)hen and Sam Krohn, '44D.
Refreshments prepared by the Hil-
social comnmittee under Zena
kin, '46, will be served by junior
istesses, NormaLappen, '48, Carol
iberman, '48, and Anne Cohen, '47.
the conclusion of Prof. Newcomb's
[dress.
All students, servicemen and
wnspeople are cordially invited to
tend the lecture to which there is
admission charge.

Luncheons at
Lane Hall Will
Be Scheduled
First of the Saturday noon lunch-
eons at Lane Hall will be held tomor-
row with all students and servicemen
at the University invited.
Discussion on topics of current in-
terest wil be included at the lunch-
eon. Frank H. Littell, newly ap-
pointed director of the Student Re-
ligious Association, will be the speak-
er. Sponsored by the SRA, the series
will continue each Saturday through-
out the year.
The group will meet at 12:15 p. m.
in the fireplace room in Lane Hall.
Reservations may be made by phon-
ing 4121, extension 2148. Those who
are interested- in attending are urged
to call by 10 a. m. tomorrow.
for lovely portraits, identifications
SANFORD BLACK
STUDIO
20 .Main -- Kresge Bld'g.
Phone 7762

l:

1

EVELYN PHILLIPS
Appointed Managing Editor

STAN WALLACE
Re-appointed City Editor

RAY DIXON
Named as Associate Editor

HANK MANTHO
Re-appointed Sports Editor

LEE AMER
Re-appointed Business Manager

rr.. .,.... ...... ... ........, ...aau:.sub va

FOR FREE PHILIPPINES:
Hon. Francis B. Sayre Opens
Oratorical Lectures Nov. 16

Michigan
Today
John Garfield
Paul Henreid
Sydney Greenstreet

Opening lecture in the Oratorical
Association series for 1944-45 on Nov.
16, will be that of the Hon. Francis
B. Sayre, high commissioner to the
Philippines at the time of the Japa-
nese invasion, speaking on "Our
Relations With the Philippines."
Sayre, who is said to be favorable
toward Philippine independence,
gained a thorough knowledge of the
Islands as chairman of the Joint
Preparatory Committee on Philippine
Affairs and as a member of the body
planning economic relations between
this country and the Philippines
when the Islands receive their inde-
pendence in 1946.
He has clashed with the President
of the Islands Manuel Quezon on
several occasions but for his insist-
ence on the maintenance of democ-
racy in the Philippines and not on
the basic issue of independence for
the Islands. Feeling that the Fili-
Jo Ann Peterson Accepts
Post at New York Firm

in

"Between
Two'
Worlds""
FROM THE NOVEL
"OUTWARD BOUND"

pinos are being steered toward a dic-
tatorship, he has held that the years
preceding independence must firmly
establish democracy.
After more than twenty years on
the faculty of Harvard Law School
and one time assistant to the presi-
dent of Williams College, Sayre re-
ceived his earlier diplomatic experi-
ence as adviser in foreign affairs to
the Siamese government. On behalf
of Siam, he negotiated new political
and commercial treaties with France,
Great Britain, the Netherlands,
Spain, Portugal, Denmark, Norway,
Sweden and Italy and for his servi-
ces received high honors from King
Rama VI of Siam.
Prior to his appointment in 1933
as assistant secretary of state, he
had served as Massachusetts State
Commissioner of Correction and di-
rector of the Harvard Institute of
Criminal Law.
Eight Students Earn
Four-Point Average
The University released yesterday
the list of those students who obtain-
ed all A's during the summer term.
In the College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts, Morris Bornstein,
Liselotte Hecht, Frank Honigsbaum,
Gretel Schinnerer, Kenneth Scott,
Dorothy Weihrauch and J. D. Wheel-
er achieved a perfect record.
Frederick Ziemann attained afl
A's in the School of Forestry and Con-
servation.

Meeting To Be
For Inductees
Army Life Will Be
Subject of Discussion
John Allison, former Army man,
will serve as chairman for Washte-
naw County's fourth pre-induction
informational meeting to be held Nov.
8, it was announced today by Miss
Edith M. Bader, of the local Civilian
Defense office.
The OCD and local draft boards,
co-sponsors of the activity, have not
as yet decided on a meeting place,
she stated.
Pre-induction meetings, termed
"an integral part of the war effort"
by ranking Army and Navy officials,
are held throughout the country to
help parents and draftees adjust
themselves to changes brought about
by miltiary life.
Invitations are being sent to more
than 80 prospective Washtenaw ser-
vicemen and their parents, Miss Bad-
er added.

Alpha Chi Sigma
To Meet Tuesday
Alpha Chi Sigma, national
fessional chemical fraternity,
hold its weekly meeting at 7:30

pro-
will
p.m.,

Miss Jo Ann Peterson, former asso-
also ciate sports editor of The Daily, has
accepted a position in the publicity
C r-oondepartment of Conde Nast Publica-I
Color Ca rtions, New York City, it was revealed
and News yesterday.,
Miss Peterson, the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Ward Peterson of Ann Ar-
bor, was graduated from the Univer-
INVEST IN VICTORY sity in June, 1944. She majored in
English and received two Hopwood
UY WAR BONDS & STAMPS awards for poetry.

Tuesday, in Rm. 309 of the Chemis-
try Building to discuss the' sponsor-
ing of freshman smokers.
The regular night for the weekly
meetings and the luncheon days will
also be decided. New vice-alchemist
for the coming year will be elected.
Master Alchemist will be Robert
Foreman; master of ceremonies, Ber-
nard A. Williams; ecorder, Ernest
Van Valkenburg; tr asurer, William
Insull, Jr., and reporter, Richardl
Mock.I

Sigrid Schultz'
To Give Lecture
Profit To Go Toward
Swimming Pool Fund
Part of the proceeds from tickets
sold for the lecture to be given by
Miss Sigrid Schultz at 8 p.m., Thurs-
day, in Rackham Auditorium will go
toward the women's swimming pool
fund.
Miss Schultz who attended' school
in' Chicago, private schools in Paris,
the Sorbonne, and later the Univer-
sity of Berlin, was forced to live in
Berlin during World War I because
of the illness of her mother. As soon
as the armistice was signed she be-
gan her career as a newspaperwo-
man, heading the Berlin office of the
Chicago Daily Tribune's Central
European Bureau for 16 years.
In her book "Germany Will Try It
Again," Miss Schultz states her be-
liefs that the Nazis' attempts to
delay the peace by fifth column
activities can only be thwarted by
intelligent alertness, clear thinking
and energy on the part of the United
Nations. She believes that if we are
alert, recognize and meet their strat-
egies with absolute resistance, the
plans will be dropped.
Tickets for the lecture may be
purchased from members of the Wo-
men's War Council and the Michigan
Alumnae Club, at the League, the
Union, and at book stores on State
St.
Fishing Tackle
To Be Made
Decision Points Way to
Recreational Normalcy
WASHINGTON, Nov. , 2.-(AP)-A
new fishing rod may be one of the
first signposts pointing the way back
to recreational normalcy from war-
time conditions.
The War Production Board has
authorized increased production of
rods, reels and other fishing tackle,
and the government's fish and wild-
life service sees this as a definite
break for America's sports-loving
millions.
By spring, manufacturers will have
a substantial amount of new equip-
ment on the market for 12,000,000'
pleasure fishermen, many of whom
'have been getting along with prewar
leftovers.
Even the Army and Navy agree
that there is nothing quite as good
for the nerves as a day in a boat or
on the bank trying to tempt bass or
trout, cat or crappie to hook on.
The services have stocked waters
near government hospitals. They
encourage conyalescing war veterans
to go fishing as often as possible.

---

Cdl Out 4o LG

INVEST IN V
BUY WAR BONDS

ICTORYl
& STAMPS

..
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t"

BALLET MUSIC

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

. -:

-on

)*Iecord.4 -

LIGIFT5 RHVTHIMIC MUSIC

BY' GREAT

COMPOSERS

GLUCK: B4LLET SUITE (Arr. Molti)
Fiedler and Boston Pops Orchestra -
D M 787 ......................-
CHOPIN: LES SYLPHIDES
Sargent and London Philharmonic
DM 306
OFFENBACH: GAITE PARISIENNE
Kurtz and London Philharmonic
M X 115 . .. .............

WANTED
MEN FOR BOARD at A. T. O. house,
700 South State. Call house man-
ager. Nick Krusko, 23297.
ALTERATIONS LADIES DRESSES,
suits, coats. Inquire about skirts for
sale. A. Graves. Opposite Stock-
well Hall.
WANTED: Rooms for delegates and
wives attending University Press
Club Thursday and Friday nights.
Nov. 9-10. List rooms with D. H.
Haines, 212 Haven Hall. Will pay
$1.50 per person per night.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Saddle leather wallet. Re-
ward. Call June Luttrell, 5938.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Kitchen help to work for
board. Call Myron Zeis 2-3171.
WANTED: Four bus boys for lunch
and dinner service at 620 State
Street. Boys or girls apply. Call
26229.
WANTED-Two boys to wait table
and wash dishes at sorority house
at lunch and dinner in return fore

meals. 3018. Ask for Mrs. Walk-
er.
DON'T STARVE, fellows! Wait table
and eat heartily at the Alpha Xi
Delta sorority house, 715 Hill
Street. Call Mrs. Donald Miles at
2-5570 immediately.
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION
POPULAR PIANO BY EAR. or classi-
cal. University music graduate.
Campus studio. Ruth Van Natter.
Phone 21575.
PIANO LESSONS: Elizabeth Har-
wood Correll. U. of M. music
school graduate-1940. 316 N. State
St. (Between Catherine & Law-
rence).

PASTEL WOOLS to start you on the right foot in
campus dress-up affairs . . . teas, rushing dates, daytces
at the Union, house get-togethers, and the concert series.
Sizes 7 to 15 and 10 to 20.
C L IN95 £ -9-m,

$3.67

ROOMS

$2.62

NIGHTS AT THE BALLET (Potpourri)
Goehr and Symphony Orchestra
DC 30 ., ........................... $3.67

IN A LEAGUE HOUSE for two girls.
Call 9871. 604 East Madison.
ONE DOUBLE or triple front room
with three meals for University
girls. Near campus. For further
information phone 3018.
FOR SALE
REMINGTON PORTABLE Type-
writer for sale. Silent model. Prac-
tically new. Call 8507. 9:00 to 5:30.

,'

TSCHAIKOVSKY: SWAN LAKE
Dorati and London Philharmonic
MM 349................ .........
RAVEL: DAPHNIS AND CHLOE (No. 2)
Ormandy and Philadelphia Symphony
DM 667 ...........................
PISTON: INCREDIBLE FLUTIST
Fiedler andBoston Pops Orchestra
DM 621 . ... ... . . . . . . . . .

$4.72

.$2.62

YV?4II

SECRETARIAL
TRAINING

. $2.62

From Bach (Wise Virgins Suite, Arr. Walton) to Stravinsky
(Petrouchka, Firebird) and Shostakovich (Age of Gold ),you
will find an extensive collection of Ballet Music at the

DAY SCHOOL
NIGHT SCHOOL

'- sl

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