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January 18, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-18

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THURSDAY, JAN. 18, 1945

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,1 +5

Grid Rivalry with Michigan State

To

Be Resumed in Fall

Basketball Team Faces
Most Difficult Weekend,
First Place Iowa, Runnerup Buckeye Tear
To Provide Opposition Tomorrow, Saturday

Facing their hardest weekend cam-
paign of the season, the Michigan
basketball team will take on Iowa
and Ohio State on successive nights,
meeting the Hawkeyes here Friday
and journeying to Columbus to face
the Bucks the following evening.
Iowa, solidly entrenched in first
place in the Big Ten standings with
a perfect record of two victories and
no losses, is rated as the top team
in the nation by the experts. Ohio
State, with a two and one showing,
is second in the Big Ten and ranks
as co-favorite with the Hawks to
Haegg, Dodds
Duel Is All Off
NEW YORK, Jan. 17.-( P)-Word
was received from Stockholm today
that Gunder Haegg, Swedish track
star, had completed plans for his
winter trip to the United States just
a few hours after Gil Dodds, expected
to be his major American rival, said
he would be unable to compete dur-
ing the coming season.
Charles Jannson, secretary of the
Swedish amateur athletic group, told
the Associated Press in Stockholm
that all the plans had been com-
pleted for the journey of Haegg and
hurdler Hakon Lidman to reach the
U.S. by Feb. 2.
Dodds, who lowered the indoor
mile time to 4:06.4 at Chicago last
spring, announced his retirement in
a letter to Dan Ferris, secretary-
treasurer of the A.A.U., in which he
said that he expected to leave Boston
Sunday for Los Angeles to take up
ministerial duties with a gospel
group.

annex the Conference crown.
Of the two quintets Iowa shapes
up as the tougher. Coach Pops Har-
rison's boys have not lost a game
all season, and have run up 221
points, an average of 67.5 per game,
to their opponents' 112. Included
in their eight-game victory string
is a 41-34 triumph over Minnesota
and 61-34 shellacking handed to Pur-
due, winners over Ohio State.
Ives Is Big Gun
The fast-breaking Iowans' chief
threat is forward Dick Ives, leading
Conference scorer last winter and
unanimous selection for all-Big Ten
honors. Ives has averaged 14.2
points per game this season, while
amassing a 114-point total. Not far
behind him is center Clayton Wilkin-
son, who has averaged an even 13
tallies per contest.
Ohio State has not fared quite so
well, but will be no soft touch, hav-
ing already trounced the Wolverines,
44-41, in overtime earlier in the
season. Since then, the Buckeyes
have taken an upset defeat from
Purdue, 37-36, but bounced righta
back to whip Northwestern, 53-36.
Risen Again
The Ohio attack is built around
towering Arnie Risen, All-American
center, who has taken up where he
left off last season in point produc-
tion. Risen ranks third in Big Ten
scoring with 40 points, 18 of them
coming in the first Michigan-Ohio
contest.'
While meeting these two first-class
foes, Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's
Wolverines will have their backs to
the wall. With two wins and two;
losses already on the records, Mich-
igan must take both games to re-1
tain any kind of a chance for a
share in the title.

DICK IVES
..Hawkeye threat
Baseball Troupe
Returns to U.S.
NEW YORK, Jan. 17.-(IP)-Leo
Durocher and the other members of
a Mediterranean USO-baseball troupe
got so close to the front lines that
once the Germans captured their
movie projector and generator.
Durocher, manager of the Brook-
lyn Dodgers, was a member of the
group, led by sports writer Tom
Meany of the newspaper PM, that
traveled 20,000 miles in 42 days and
returned home for its first report
today.

First Michigan
Relays Entered
By Six Squads
Coach Doherty Lists
1.6-Event Schedule for
Annual Extravaganza
By BILL LAMBERT
When the Michigan track squad
does pry the lid off the 1945 season,
it will do it in real style, by pres-
enting the first running of the Mich-
igan Relays Feb. 10 in the Yost
Field House.
This Relay carnival which will
sponsor 16 events during the course
of one evening, and play host to five
Mid-West cinder powers, is the first
step toward the establishment of a
permanent relay show to be held an-
nually by the University.
Word has been received that Mich-
igan State, Western Michigan, Notre
Dame, Ohio State, and Purdue will
definitely be sending teams to enter
in the competition. Marquette and
Drake were also invited, but it ap-
pears as though war-time restric-
tions- will prevent them from mak-
ing the trip.
The meet will be governed by
National Collegiate rules, and will
feature many different events, un-
common in Conference dual and
triangular meets. Besides the reg-
ular 65-yard high and low hur-
dles, there will be a special 240-
yard high hurdle relay, which will
have four hurdles spaced through-
out the distance.
The distance medley relay will be
composed of an 880-yard leg, a 440,
and then another three-quarter mile.
A special 660-yard run -and a one
and one-half mile run are two other
events which will lend variety to the
program.
The three-quarter mile relay, a
three-quarter mile run, the regular
field events, and the mile relay,
round out a program which as Track
Coach Ken Doherty put it, "will pro-
vide plenty of competition for the
participants, and plenty of thrills
for the fans."
Before the thinclads make this
opening home appearance, a few
of the team members will travel
Feb. 3 to New York's Madison
Square Gardens where they will
defend for the third successive year
their two-mile relay title in the
Millrosc Games.
The exact quartet has not been
decided yet, but will certainly be
picked from the following men: Bob
Hume, Ross Hume, Dick Barnard,
Archie Parsons, George Vetter, Bob
Thomason, Dick Gehring, Dick For-
restel, and Walt Fairservis. These
nine will run off time trials again
at 4:30 Saturday afternoon, with
those turning in the best times mak-
ing the relay team.
Julian Witherspoon, who placed
second in the Conference in the 60-
yard dash last year, may also make
the jaunt to New York, should his
times show that he has rounded
into shape sufficiently.

Schools.-Met Last in
1942 Contest Here
By BILL MULLENDORE '
Michigan State College, traditional
intra-state football rivals of Mich-
ipan, will be back on the Wolverine
grid schedule this fall, the Athletic
Department announced yesterday.
The game, slated' for Sept. 29
here, was booked after University
of Pennsylvania athletic author-
ities requested that the tentatively
scheduled Michigan-Penn clash,
also a traditional affair, be can-
celled owing to "circumstances be-
yond their control."
Michigan State last took the field
against Michigan in 1942, losing to
the Wolverines, 20-0. The Spartans
dropped football the following year,
and all grid agreements between the
two schools were dropped.
After reviving football last seas-
Sextet To Meet
Sarnia Squad
Front Line Bolstered
By Sulentich at Center
With the game against the strong
Sarnia team a few days away, Mich-
igan's hockey squad went through an
intensive drill on passing yesterday.
According to Coach Vic Heyliger,
the Sarnia club usually turns out a
fine team, and it will be a tough
aggregation to defeat Saturday. This
year's Sarnia team, however, is not
as powerful as the Vickers sextet that
defeated the Maize and Blue puck-
sters in their initial contest.
On Saturday, the fans will find
something new added to the W'ol-
verine sextet. This something is Carl
Sulentich, who has just recently be-
come eligible to play. He will be used
at center with Ted Greer and John
Jenswold in the forward line.
Old timers Bob Henderson and
Herb Upton with Dick Mixer at the
goal position fill the defensive bill.
In the reserve offensive slots are
Francis Allman, Fred Lounsberry and
Bob Lilienfield.
When the game starts, the Maize
and Blue hockey team will have an
unimpressive record behind them.
To date, the sextet has lost both of
the games played this year. In the
opener, a strong Vickers A.C. group
whipped the Wolverine rinksters, 12-
6. Last week the speedy, reserve lad-
en Minnesota pucksters shellacked
Michigan by a very impressive 10-0
score.
Saturday's game will give the Wol-
verine rinksters a chance to break
the ice and enter the win column,

Traditional Game Set for Sept. 29;
Date Left Open by Penn Cancellation

on, State sent feelers to the Uni-
versity regarding the renewal of'4
the series, but previous Michigan I
committments appeared to make
it impossible until 1946. Cancel-
lation of the Penn game, however,
left an open date in the Wolverine
'45 schedule, and the Spartans
were inserted in that spot.
This fall's encounter will mark
the thirty-eighth renewal of the long
series between the two rivals, which
began back in 1898. Michigan has!
a large edge in .the games won and!
lost column with 26 victories, six de-!
feats, and three ties. Four of the
Staters' wins were chalked up since
1934, when they first became recog-
nized as a power in the football
world.
The Spartans, coached by Charlie
Bachman, made a sterlingbcomeback
last fall after the year's layoff from
the grid wears, winning sieven of
eight games with practically an all-
freshman eleven. Up until mid-
season Bachman's youngsters figur-
ed prominently in pre-Orange Bowl
speculation, but a defeat at the hands
of Missouri ended all hopes of post-
season glory.
Addition of State to the '45 grid
card leaves the Wolverines with a
nine-game schedule. It is prob-

Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

10--Navy at' Baltiimore.
17--Purdueat A n Arbor.
24--Ohio State at Ann Ar-

bor.
Barber Services
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THE DASCOLA BARBERS
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able that another tilt,possibly with
a Mid-Western service team fhr-
nishing the opposition, will be ad-
ded to fill the Sept. 15 date.
Penn was slated to appear here
either Sept. 29, the date of the State
encounter, or Oct. 20, which has
now been left open. Athletic offi-
cials indicated that the latter date
will not be filled, as it falls between
semesters.
The revised schedule follows:
Sept. 22-Indiana at Ann Ar-
bor.
Sept. 29-Michigan State at
Ann Arbor.
Oct. 6-Northwestern at Evans-
ton.
Oct. 13-Army at New York.
Oct. 20-Open
Oct. 27--Illinois at Champaign.
Nov. 3-Minnesota at Ann Ar-
bor.

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