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January 18, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1, i4 P 'llif i d", U i P - it 'K\T -n ii -i -i 7;i7

I JI r YI . l.11 _f1A.IN 'A I L

-Hi)AY ci, :JAN.:, 18, i94

S

Widens Left

Flank Along

Luzon

Beachhead

u.... i

American Aircraft Supports All Ground
Operations at Manila and Fort Stotsenburg
By The Associated Press
GENERAL MACARTHUR'S HEADQUARTERS, Luzon, Thursday, Jan.
18-Progress stepped up along the left flank of Gen. Douglas MacArthur's
wide Luzon beachhead as Sixth Army patrols antered Pozorrubo and cut
the main highway, headquarters reported.
Other units were within a half mile of Rosario, nine miles to the
north. Action in this northwestern sector had been slowed for days by
stiff oposition and one tank-led counterattack.
Reach Bolinai Peninsula
Other Yank forces, driving 17 miles from captured Alaminos on the
right flank, secured the north end of the Bolinao Peninsula by reaching
the northern extremity.
n Driving southward from Alaminos,
" another force was headed toward
United Nations Dasol Bay.
The left flank drive reached a half
artyBemile from Rosario. Stiff resistance
still was acknowledged in General
[] Macrth"'' communiue
,eld at Hillel Forces Near Tarlac
To the south, patrols were operat-
A United Nations Party, featuring ing east of the Cararuen Hills, which
entertainment patterned after that would be excellent as observation and
of some of the Allied Nations, will be artillery points if captured, and into
field from 9 p.m. to midnight, Satur- Tarlac province. Tarlac itself was
:dy, at the Hillel Foundation, less than 18 miles away at last re-
Students at the University from ports. -
foreign lands will be special guests American aircraft, strongly sup-
of the~ Foundation at the Party at porting all1 ground operations, de-
which the theme of the. United Na- stroyed 61 Japanese planeson the
ions will be represented in enter- ground at Clark Field and at the
ainment and decoration, Barbara Cagayan Valley airdrome.
Levin, chairman of the event, indi- Carrier planes damaged four enemy
ated. freighters north of Lingayen Gulf
Several French songs will be sung and PT boats sank four barges off of
y Vienna-born Josephine Reiseher, Vigan, a port still farther north on
and Russian songs will e rendered the west coast of Luzon.
y Irene Gsovsky. Palestinian songs HafMeFoms ro
and dances, Chinese and English H alf cile mns aoc
songs, and dances of Latin American Two yank columns were approach-
ountries will also be featured on the ing the important city of Tarlac on
mtertainment program. Luzon's central plains. m
________________General' MacArthur's communique
describing the left flank operation
Detroit To Keep Eastern said "We have driven to within half
War Time for Duration a mile of Rosario from the west and
cut the main central plains highway
DETROIT, Jan. 17.-(R')-Detroit at obonan, eight miles to the south.
vill stay on Eastern War Time for Our patrols have entered Pozorubio."
he duration of the war, the common U. S. planes ranging the central
ouncil decided Wednesday. Luzon plains and the areas south of
The council also voted to inform Manila destroyed a number of loco-
he state senate of the action. A bill motives, freight cars, three tanks
0 change to Central War Time in and more than 50 trucks.
he *state is now before the legisla- Heavy bombers hit supply and
,ure. bivouac installations at Fort Stots-
enburg, adjacent to Clark Field,
starting fires.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY Prof. Davis To
Review Book
LOST AND FOUND A review of J. Donald Adam's
OST: Gold diamond and rubies book, "The Shape of Books to Come,"
ring. Reward. Call 6961 or 2- will be the topic of a Fireside Dis-
2521 ext. 307. cussion to be held at 8:30 p. m. to-
morrow at the Hillel Foundation at
OST: Black Schaeffer pen, Jan. 10, which Prof. Joe Lee Davis of the -
in or between Angell Hall, Quar- English department will speak.
ry, A. D. P., Univ. Hosp. Call In addition to leading a discussion
Ruth Cox, 2-2521 ext. 379. on the book, Prof. Davis will ana-
lyze the trend of books in wartime
OST: Cocker spaniel, black and and outline the contributions of lit-
white male, 9 months. Any infor- Ierature to the war effort.
mation regarding dog will be ap- A social hour, at which refresh-
preciated. Reward. Phone 2-1729. ments will be served, will follow the
discussion.
Continuous from 1 P.M. Allied Shells, Bombs
.I .ANN.OB0.9NEWE4 rvtvtal _._

* ,~~Hng ~*n
BuUmOR MSt A ar
*a"' Aparr
v w HANAN* Aar°
YL ngayen PHLPIC
Caipo Tsink a . ja o
CORREGIDOR~
CaENCINCmianh MiNOR
R. - Ta sanga
a nabn
.V: nbg nKo q
Brun'4RNEdePc
I300 *® rNDANAO
AMERICAN CARRIER PLANFS STRIKE CHINA PORTS-UT. S. Lhird
fleet carrier planes have raided Japanese shipping in the China ports of
Honk Kong, Swatow and Amey, the navy has announ ci. Th ese at-
tacks were made mn addition to the previously-reported raids on enEy
shippng and shoe nstallations along the Indo-Chna coast, parILAu-
larly in the Saion and Ca'ranh Ba' areas
is/iqanSJteMAa
a, ®LYT

Editor's Note: Contributions to this col-
umn should be addressed to The Mili-
tary Editor, The Michigan Daily, Stu-
dent Publications Building, 420 Maynard.
The promotion of SWIFT TAR-
BELL, group gunnery officer in a
B-24 Liberator bomber group of the
Eighth Air Force (England), from
first lieutenant to captain was re-
cently announced.
A resident of Ann Arbor and a
geography and geology major at
the University before induction into
the armed forces in 1942, Capt.
Tarbell is in charge of training
programs whereby combat gunners
are kept in practice. He is in
charge of training all gunners in
the 445th bombardment group.
Recipient of the Distinguished Fly-
ing Cross and the Air Medal with
three Oak Leaf clusters, Capt. Tar-
bell has served as both bombardier
and nose turret gunner on :5 com-
bat missions.
Recently returned to the United
States from the Philippine Islands
is Lt. (j.g.) F. ,P. CAMPBELL,
class of '43, a survivor of the de-
stroyer U. S. S. Cooper, sunk in a
recent encounter with the Japs in
Ormoc Bay on Leyte Island.
Lt. Campbell was torpedo officer
on the Cooper before returning from
active duty to spend part of his
leave with friends in Ann Arbor.
Two former University students
who are now serving in France with
the same Army Civil Affairs unit
were rehently promoted.
LLOYD R. GATES, a civil engi-
neering graduate in 1928, was pro-
moted from major to lieutenant colo-
nel and ARTHUR D. FOLEY, who1

graduated with a AB in political sci-
ence in 1941, was promoted from sec-
ond to first lieutenant.
Flying on escort missions with
U. S. bombers deep inside Germany,
Lt. WARNER C. JENNINGS, Mus-
tang fighter pilot who was a soph-
omore at the University before en-
tering the AAF, has been awarded
the 'Air Medal for "meritorious.
achievement."
FRANK N. SMITH, who received
his degree here in engineering in the
class of 1939, has recently been pro-
moted from first lieutenant to cap-
tain. Capt. Smith is company com-
mander in an Engineer Regiment
stationed in southern France.
Two Areas Inied
Says WMC wector
DETROIT, Jan. 17-!P)-Consoli-
dation of the Battle Creek and Ben-
ton Harbor areas of the War Man-
power Commission in Michigan an(i
extension of the Flint area to in-
clude Saginaw and Bay City were an-
nounced today by Edward L. Cush-
man, State WMC Director. Mecosta
County has been added to the Grand.
Rapids area.
The changes reduce the number of
areas in Michigan from nine to seven
and are made in the interest of
economy and east of administration,
Cushman said.
Harry L. Ward, Director of the
Saginaw area will have charge of the
new Battle Creek area, and David M.
Martin, of Flint, will have charge
of the new Flint-Saginaw area.
- - -t

1

Leadership by
Students To Be
Lectre Topic
Van 1-usen To Speak
At Lydia Mendelssohn
"Student Leadership in the War
and Post-War World" is the topic on
vhich Dr. Henry P. Van Dusen, newly
elected president of Union Theologi-
cal Seminary, will address students
at 3 p.m, Jan. 22 at the Lydia Men-
delssoin Theatre.
A member of the National Council
on Religion in Higher Education,
Van Dusen has also shown his inter-
est in student work by his long
friendship to and sponsorship of the
World Student Service Fund.
Van Dusen was a delegate to the
Madras Conference during a trip
around the world visiting mission
fields. A result of this trip was his
survey "For the Healing of the Na-
tions" which was a study book writ-
ten for the Missionary Education
Movement.
A trustee of the Nanking Theologi-
cal Seminary, Van Dusen is also
Chairman of the "Christian Classics
Series" for the National Christian
Council of China.
After graduation from Princeton
University. Van Dusen received grad-
uated degrees from Union Theologi-
cal Seminary and the University of
Edinburgh.
State. League
'tillDirected
y Committee
A temporary three-man ommittee
will sunervise activities of the Michi-
g ean Municipal League, "until the
League can find an executive secre-
tary," Douglas Turnbull, the organi-~
ation's president said yesterday.
The League, without an executive
head since Herbert Olson, resigned
Jan. 1, has interviewed numerous ap-
plicants for the position with little
success, Turnbull stated.
John Witherspoon, Detroit Police
Commissioner, George Sandenburgh,
local public works department head,
and 'Turnbull are serving on the
committee
escu ed 0.1 To
Return Home
DENVER, COLO, Jan. 17--P)-
Swift transportation, around more
than half of the world, and army
surgery saved the life of Tech. 5th
Grade George Marquist, who today
was thinking about returning to his
farm at New Haven, Mich.
Marquist was shot in the heart
by a Japanese sniper during the in-
vasion of the Philippines.
The Nipponese bullet lodged in
the left ventricle, and for days, each
time the soldier breathed, there wasf
a danger that the bullet would push
through the cardiac wall and pro-
duce a fatal hemorrhage.
Marquist, assigned tothe 96th Di-f
vision as a switchboard operator,j
was rushed by plane, ship and train!
to the Fitzsimmons hospital here
where Army surgeons removed the
bullet and he recovered.
Marquist was shot on O-Day plus
three.
INVEST IN VICTORY

BUY WAR BONDSI

l1rl,,iv rl'OYS AWAKEN.-

"The Steadfast Tin Soldier" will
be presented by Play Production for
the Children's Theatre tomorrow at
3:45 p.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The play based upon a Hans Christ-

ian Andersen story, tells of Peter,
played by Mavis Kennedy, who finds
that his toys have suddenly come to
life. He sees Garoo, the wicked gol-
liwog played by Mary Ruth Acton,
quarrelling with a Tin Soldier over
Lovely Lysa, the crisp Paper Lady.
Jeanne Parsons will be seen as Lovely
Lysa
Raggedy Ann is played by Betty
Godwin. Also included in the cast
are Claire Melsels as Popeyes, the
Teddy with the pink bow; Mary
Bronson as Monty Mac; and Joyce
Siegen as Pidgeon Toes, the mis-
chievous Teddy with the blue bow.
Jean Adams will be seen as 'Nurse
Nellie, Jean Murray as Mrs. Peter,
and Elizabeth. Needham as the Head
Tin Soldier. The other Tin Soldiers
are Jeanne Burns, Betty Korash,
Betty Kowalsky, Carol McCormick,
Jacqueline Shepherd, and Margaret
Walsh.
"The Steadfast Tin Soldier" is un-
der the direction of Valentine Windt,
and the setting has been designed by
Herbert Philippi. Jeanne Parsons is
the choreographer.
Tickets are on sale in all grade
schools this week, or may be pur-
chased at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre box office today, tomorrow
and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Resident Houses To
Get "Campus News"

4

x
4

,1.

WIlE/V TOYS AWAKEN:

0

Children's Theatre To Present
'The Steadfast Tin Soldier'

"Campus News,"' a newspaper is-
sued by the Executive Council of the
Union, will be dis tributed to all men
'~and women residence houses today.
Copies will also be available at the
Union or the League and on the
JEANNE PARSONS ; Diagonal from 8 to 10 a.m. The paper
... As Lovely Lysa was first issued this summer.

h

t

a

:*

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
RACKKAM LECTURE HALL

Friday, Jan. 19, 8:30 P.M.
QUARTET IN D MAJOR, K. 499
QUARTET. . . . .
QUARTET IN C-SHARP MINOR, OP. 131
Saturday, Jan. 20, 230 P.M.
QUARTET IN G MAJOR, Op. 18, No. 2
QUARTET No. 7, OP. 96 . . . .
QUARTET IN A MINOR, OP. 51, No. 2
Saturday, Jan. 20,. :30 P.M.
QUARTET IN G MINOR, Or. 74, No. 3
QUARTET IN E-FLAT MAJOR . .
QUARTET IN C MAJOR, OP. 59, No. 3

a4

By The Associated Press
SOUTHEAST ASIA COMMAND
HEADQUARTERS, Kandy, Ceylon,
Jan. 17.-Allied fighter-bombers have
poured rocket shells and bombs on
Japanese positions in north central
Burma in support of advancing Brit-
ish infantry columns, an Allied com-
munique announced today.
Michigan
Now Showing
ECTACtE AND THRILLS!

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

. . . fMozart
Samuel Barber
Beethoven
Beethoven
Ernst K e 'ek
. . Brahms
. . . Haydn
Hindemith
..-Beethoven

THURSDAY, JAN. 18, 1945
VOL. LV, No. 61
Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angell Hail, by 3:30 p. m. of the day
preceding publication (11:30 a. m. Sat-
urdays).
Notices
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, College of Pharmacy, School
of Business Administration, School of
Education, School of Forestry and
Conservation, School of Music,
DR. MARY MINNISS
Chiropodist
All foot troubles quickly
relieved.
Corner Main and williams
Thurs. Evenings by Appointment
Ph. 2-2370

School of Public Health; Fall Term,
Schedule of Examinations, Feb. 17 to
Feb. 24, 1945.
Note: For courses having both lec-
tures and quizzes, the time of exer-
cise is the time of the first lecture
period of the week; for courses hav-
ing quizzes only, the time of exerceise
is the time of the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the
regular schedule. To avoid misun-
derstandings and errors, each stu-
dent should receive notification from
his instructor of the time and place
of his examination. Instructors in
the College of LS&A are not permit-
ted to change the time of examina-
tion without the approval of the
Examination Committee.
Time of Exercise Time of Exam.
Mon. at 8-Thu., Feb. 22, 10:30-12:30
Mon. at 9-Sat., Feb. 17, 10:30-12:30
Mon. at 10-Fri., Feb. 23, 8:00-10:00
M. at 11-Tues., Feb. 20, 8:00-10:00
Mon. at 1-Wed., Feb. 21, 2:00-4:00
(Continued on Page 4)
4.o
__*

Season Tickets (3 concerts) : $3.00, $2.40 and $1 .20
Sngle Concerts: $1.20 and 60 cents.
On Sole at the University Musical Society, Burton
Memorial Tower, and in the Lobby of the
Rackham Building before concerts.

Todo marcha perfectamente... Have a Coke
(EVERYTHING'S GOIN' 0. K)

1 1 41

*

_4

.........3.

= Emu--Z- -W

AIIA&SkI PRR~ - ~ - i-i;-

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