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January 17, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-17

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II14~ MIfAHIGAIN DAILY

RAGE Vi

Michigan Tankmen Aim
For Initial Big Ten Win
Strong Northwestern Furnishes Opposition
As Wolverines Defend Conference Crown
In their initial Western Conference clash of the season, the Maize and
Blue natators are scheduled to meet a powerful Northwestern squad on
Saturday at the Sports Building.
The Wolverines, defending Big Ten champions, are anxious to prove
their mettle by registering a decisive victory over the Wildcat squad to
compensate for their 44-40 defeat by Great Lakes. Sparking the Michi-
gan attack are such stalwarts as Captain Mert Church, Big Ten 50-yard
freestyle champ, Chuck Fries, Conference 100-yard champ, and Heini
Kessler, Big Ten breaststroke champ.
Northwestern's power is centered around backstroker Bob Tribble and
Ed Walsh, ace breaststroke performer. Tribble bested Michigan's Gordon
Pulford in the breastroke event last season and it remains to be
seen whether he can repeat this performance.
The. big question mark in the com----
ing clash is Bob Munson, another which he will develop steadily as
Maize and Blue backstroke contest- the season progresses.
ant. Munson, a young and inexper- T
ienced member of Coach Matt The explanation is substantiated
Mann's squad, is exhibiting great by Kessler's exhibition in his 100-
promise in practice sessions and his yard leg of the medley relay, when
speed and form are improving stead- he picked up generous yardage on
ily. He surprised everyone by put- the Navy men. Therefore, Coach
ting up a terrific battle in the Great Mann believes that Kessler will still
Lakes meet, finishing second to Blue- prove to be the undisputed confer-
jacket Everett Turley. In that tilt ence champ by registering a decisive
Munson grabbed the lead at the' defeat over Walsh and, thereafter,
sin gunrand tremaed ot in over all Big Ten opponents.
startmng gun and remained out in Graham Davis and Bill Huesner
front, the undisputed leader, until pose definite threats to Maize and
the final lap, when the Navy man Blue supremacy in the distance free-
just managed to nose him out.-

High Scoring
Race Marks
I-M Contests
Bob Youngdahl Leads
In individual Scoring
Although the Intramural court
season is still only in the embryo
stage, several individual hoopsters
have already produced some impres-
sive records in the point-garnering
department.
High man among all the leagues is
Bob Youngdahl, who continued his
speedy pace by sparking his quintet,
the Rebels of the Independent
League, to its second win of the sea-
son. He bagged nine field goals and
one free throw to boost his season's
total to 45 points.
Other leading point-getters of the
two-days old campaign are Lamar
Kishlar of Sigma Chi (General Fra-
ternity League team) with 33 to his
credit, Joe Picard of Phi Chi totaling
32, Warren Aylward of the Rebels
boasting 30. Robert Revis, Rangers,
with 29, Dick Freeman of Delta Tau
Delta with 28 and Nick Krusko, who
has collected 27 for Alpha Tau Ome-
ga.
The following are the team stand-
ings in the leagues including the
games played last Saturday:

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THE TEAM TO BEAT-(Left to right) Iowa's coach "Pops" Harrison;. Clayton Wilkinson, center; Herbert Wilkinson and Co-Capt. Jack
Spencer, guards; Dick Ives and Co-Capt. Ned Postel, Yorwards-
STILL FIGHTiNG FOR LEAD:

SERVICE LEAGUE

Although Coach Mann believes
that the young Wolverine star
lacks the competitive experience
necessary to defeat a veteran such
as the Evanston boy, an eye should
be kept on him, as his :past per-
formances show that he can be
counted on to garner added points
for the Maize and Blue.
Wildcat Ed Walsh finished right
on the heels of Kessler in the breast-
roke event of last year's meet. Walsh
is a powerful swimmer and a figlt-
ing competitor, and he poses a
threat to any opponent. - But Coach
Mann believes that Kessler, defend-
ing Big Ten champ, will repeat his
performance of last year and clinch
a victory for the Michigan squad.
Kessler was the victim of an
early season upset at the hands of
Ray Mundro of Great Lakes. Mun-
dro, competing against the Wol-
verine star in the 200-yard breast-
roke event, churned his way to a
last-lap victory. This defeat is
attributed, by Coach Mann, to the
fact that Kessler was not in top
shape and lacked the endurance
War -Demands
but Reserves
Major Leagues Lose
24 Players to Service
NEW YORK, Jan. 16.-(iP)-Man-
power demands continued to bite
deeper into major league reserves
today as the number of big time
baseball players entering the service
since the close of the 1944 season
rose to at least 24 as compared to six
discharged veterans who may return
to the game.
Although the number of players
who left their clubs was less than
five per cent of the total on the 16
reserve lists, many more entered
essential industry and jobs helping
the war effort, giving no hint of their
1945 plans.
Joe Cronin's Boston Red Sox, nick-
ed heavily last summer when Tex
Hughson, Bobby Doerr and Hal Wag-
ner were called up in the thick of
the four-way American League pen-
nant fight, again were the hardest
hit.
Catchers Bill Conroy and Roy Par-
tee, third baseman Jim Tabor and
rookie pitcher Mel Deutsch, up from
Louisville, joined such stars as Ted
Williams, Dom DiMaggio and Johnny
Pesky in the service of their country.
Even the St. Louis Cardinals, the
world champions who were generally
accepted to be the only real big
league club last season, lost pitcher
Fred Schmidt and will give up out-
fielder Stan Musial to the Navy Fri-
day. The Donora, Pa. slugger who
finished second to Fred "Dixie"
Walker in the National League bat-
ting race, passed his physical exami-
nation some time ago. Lefty Max
Lanier received his reclassification
and is on.-call.
CLASSIFTEY
DIRMECtpOY

syle evenu. -.he geat es clash
revealed the fact the Michigan isI
sorely lacking in distance men.,
Church and Fries, although tops in
the short distance division, can not
compete successfully against experi-
enced swimmers in the longer runs.'
Wolverine hopes are pinned on these1
two and Dave Zimmerman, Don
Bridges, Bill Breen, and Charlie Hig-
gins to wrest victory from the Wild-
cat's hands.
Roberts States!
Better Training
M eans Records
Ray Roberts, veteran Michigan
trainer, believes that better coaching
methods rather than better athletes.
are the real reason for a steady low-
ering of the records in practically all
sports.
Roberts stated that the athletes of
the early '20's were better individual-;
ly than those of today or even those
i immediately preceding the w a r.
What is his reason? It is this: "The
old timers worked and trained harder
to attain condition and success. But
coachmg and coaching methods have
improved to such an extent that
marks continue to be bettered despite
the fact that few modern athletes
ever approach the condition of the
old timers."
If athletes of the '20's were given
the benefit of today's coaching, they
would wreck the modern.record book,
Roberts stated.

TEAM
NavySupply
4th Lloyd ...
Co. C .......
First Batt. .. .
Raigers.....
Sangeneers
RONAGS ....
Sigma Chi ...

. .
. .

WON LOST
.2 0
. 1 1
. ....1 1
. ....1 1
.0 1
. ... 0 2
. ....0 2

Two of the four Michigan basket-
ball -players among the first six in
the Conference individual scoring
race two Saturdays ago remained1
in that bracket over the weekend
schedule of games, according to
statistics released by Big Ten auth-1
orities.
Bob Geahan, Michigan forward
leading the scorers a week ago with#
a 40-point total, dropped to second
place with 49 markers to his credit,
while first place honors went to
Max Morris, Northwesterncenter,
who rose from the third spot which
he occupied two weeks ago with 21
points garnered in a single game.!
Morris now boasts a stratosphericI
56 point total for three games, which
is an average of better than 18
markers for each contest. The'
Northwestern center, a product of
West Frankfort, Ill., has scored 22
field goals and 12 free throws so
far this season.
Michigan center, Don Lund, who
was tied for second place with Ohio
State's center, Arnie Risen, in the
iritial release of the standings, ad-
ded only three points to his 31 point'
total in the game with Illinois Sat-
urday, and dropped to fourth place.;
Risen went down a notch to third,
with 40 points.
Wolverine guard Walt Kell, who
was originally among the first six,
wound up in 16th position with 23
points, while John Mullaney, tied

with Kell two weeks ago at 18, only
scored two points Saturday for a
total of 20.
Forwards in First Place
The team standings this week find
Iowa in undisputed possession of
first place. The Hawks have a per-
feet record, with two wins registered
against no losses. They are fol-
lowed by Northwestern and Ohio
State, tied for second with a two

and one record for a .667 average.
Illinois and Michigan come next,
each with an even break, and are
followed by Wisconsin, Purdue, Min-
nesota, and-Indiana. Only the Hoo-
siers have failed to win a victory in
the Conference.
Meanwhile, the Wolverines are
preparing for their clash with Iowa
here Friday. The Hawkeye team
shapes up as the most formidablef

opponent the cagers have faced all
season, but the Michigan team will,
as usual, be "up" for this contest.,
Five experienced men form the
nucleus of the Iowa team, which has
won Big Ten contests from Minne-
sota and Purdue.
Big Ten Standings

. .
. .

Roosevelt Gives Baseball 'Go
Ahead' Sign for 1945 Season
Game To continue Unless Sport Interferes
With Personnel of Essential War Industries
By BUSS HAM
Associated Press Correspondent .
WASHINGTON, Jan. 16-President Roosevelt today gave baseball
the "go ahead" sign for the 1945 season. If it can operate without inter-
fering with the war efort.
At a news conference, he said he favors continuation of the game
so long as it does not rob the services or essential industry of needed
manpower.
This was accepted by baseball meni as the official approval for
which they have been waiting for weeks."
But the President left no doubt that it is up to baseball to get along as
best it can without using men who can fight or man war-essential jobs.
He pointed out that he does not think any perfectly healthy young
man should be playing baseball in these times.
Nevertheless, baseball felt that the President had befriended the game
for the second time during the war. Shortly after Pearl Harbor he took
thee position that the sport should keep going as a morale builder.
Since War Mobilization Director Jimmy Byrnes called for re-examina-
tion of professional athletes and 4-Fs, baseball has had the jitters, but the,
President's comment dissolved much of this doubt about the immediate
future.

Iowa
Northwestern
Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Illinois
Wisconsin
Purdue
Minnesota
Indiana

G
2
4
2
2
4
1

W
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
0

L Pet
0 1000
1 667
1. 66'7
2 500
1 500
1 500
2 333
3 250
1 000

i
-.
t
.
i
k

PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE
Nu Sigma Nu ...........2
Xi Psi Phi.............1
Delta Tau Delta...:....1
Phi Chi...............1
Alpha Kappa Kappa 1
Delta Sigma Delta ......
Phi Rho Sigma........0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon ... 0
GENERAL LEAGUE
Sigma Chi.............2
Delta Kappa Epsilon ,. .1
Sigma Phi Epsilon ...... i
Alpha Tau Omega.......1
Phi Sigma Delta ........ 1
Lambda Chi Alpha ......1
Zeta Beta Tau.........0
Phi Delta Theta ........0
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE
Rebels ,.................2
Golden Bears 1...., ..
Robert Owen ..........1.
Foresters ...............0
IHi-Temnps ...... . .. .... .0
Navy Spurns;
Army Takes

0
0
1
1
1
1
I
2
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
0
.1
2
2

{
1
3
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f
t
A
I
i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Different Ment
To Lead Squad
Coach Wally Weber of Michigan's
wrestling team announced yesterday
that no permanent captain will be
chosen for this year's squad but a
different man will be selected before
each meet on the basis of his pre-
vious week's work
Weber further stated that he and
Jim Galles would confer before mak-
ing the choice and that most of the
men on the squad would get a
chance to be captain before the
season is over. At the end of the
campaign the squad will meet to
elect a captain for next year's team.
The practice of challenging the
leader in each division will still be
continued with the slight variation
that each challenger will have to
wrestle the other men in his partic-'
ular weight bracket in a simulated
tournament and the winner will be
permitted to challenge the top man.
Especially in the heavier weights
where there is a dearth of competi-
tion, the leaders are anxious to take
on all challengers.

(Continued from Page 2)

be a meeting at 7:30 p.m. in the
Union.
Research Club: The January meet-
ing of the Club will be held in the'
Amphitheatre of the Rackham Buil-
ding, this evening at eight o'clock.
Professor Carl D. LaRue will read a
paper on "Studies on the Growth and
Regeneration of Plant Embryos and
Endosperms in Culture" and Profes-
sor C. C. Fries a paper on "Some
Illustrations of Modern Linguistic
Principles and Techniques."
La Sociedad Hispanica announces
that the first lecture in the annual1
series will take place this evening atI
eight o'clock in Rm. 316 Michigan
Union. Professor Hayward Keniston
will speak on "Impressiones de la
Argentina y de los Argentinos." Tick-
ets for the series may be purchased!
in Rm. 112 Romance Language Buil-
ding or from any teacher of Spanish.
Coin t ' Eveti s

the East Engineering Building, Mr.
M. J. Sinnott will speak on the sub-
ject "Photographic Methods for En-
gineers." All persons interested aree
cordially invited to attend.
Alpha Phi Omega will hold a meet-X
ing in the Michigan Union on Thurs-
day, Jan. 18 at 7:30 p.m. All mem-
bers are requested to attend. Alpha
Phi Omega extends a special invita-
tion to this meeting to any faculty
member interested in becoming at
faculty advisor of the fraternity. Will
those attending please come prompt-
ly, as the Engineering Smoker is at
the same time and some members
would like to attend this smoker.-
Attention Engineers: All engineers
are invited to a smoker, sponsored by
the Engineering Council, to be held
at the Michigan Union, Thursday
evening at 7:30. Freshmen and trans-
fer students are especially urged to
attend. The purpose of the smoker
is to acquaint the students with
Engineering organizations and how-
the individual may participate in
these extra-curricular campus activi-
ties. Short talks and exhibits will be
presented by the ditferent organiza-
tions.
Geological Journal Club meets in1
Rm. 4065, Nat. Sci. Bldg. at 12:15t
p.m. on Friday, Jan. 19. Program:i
Davies, Kellum and Swinney, "Geo-
logical Explorations in the Wide BayI
Area, Alaska." All interested are cor- j
dially invited to attend, 1

Clark Griffith, owner of the Washington Senators, said that "Base-.
ball is pleased that the President has said to go ahead without inter- c
ference in the war effort."t
What caliber of teams the clubs field will "depend on the rejectedv
and returned players that we get," Griffith added.t
Most of the teams have a few men above the age limit as well as a
handful of "kids about 17 who will have a wonderful opportunity tof
play in the big leagues," he said.I
"I think we can continue all right under Mr. Roosevelt's outline,"t
Griffith declared.C
Approximately 500 players including 223 4-Fs, were on the rosters of
the two Major League clubs last season, but a substantial percentage of
these were farmed out to the minors.
Army physical standards have not been lowered and it is presumed
that some 4-Fs will again be rejected unon re-examination. However,
these are expected to go into essential industry.
Many already are taking jobs in war plants in order to help out in
the war effort and be available for whatever baseball is possible under
existing conditions.
Baseball officials have maintained all along that they will put teams
on the field, if they have only nine men to a side, unless the government
definitely halts play.
j The President's encouragement was. the third good break for base-
ball the past few days. A War Manpower official and the War Committee
on conventions said that restrictions on lighting and conventions do not
apply to sports events.
Foriner Grid Star Is -omnoted
Lieutenant Don W. Robinson, a
member of the 1941 and 1942 foot- sustained operational activity
against the enemy." He is a pilot
ball squads, has been promoted to of a 15th AAF B-24 Liberator.
the rank of First Lieutenant, accord- As a member of the Wolverine grid
ing to an Army press release. squad, Robinson was a reserve half-
Since his arrival overseas last Sep- back in '42 and replaced Tom Kuz-
tember, he has earned the Air Medal ma in '43 when Kuzma was injured
for "meritorious achievement in and forced to give up gridiron ac-
aerial flight while participating in tivities.

24 NAVY p. 3 MI Garand
NEW HAVEN- (!P)- The New
Haven Register says that Willie Pep,
of Hartford, holder of the world fea-
therweight boxing championship in
New York and several affiliated
states, was accepted for general Army
duty at the New Haven Induction
Center.
Pen served nine months in the
United States Navy before he was
granted an honorable discharge for
medical reasons in June.
Pep was the first nationally-known
athlete to be re-examined for active
duty after a medical discharge from
the armed forces.
Willie's acceptance for service may
mean that hundreds of professional
athletes, now classified as 4-F may
be placed in khaki or blue:

BUDAPEST QUARTET

The Geometry Seminar will meet
Thursday, Jan. 18, in Rm. 3001 An-
gell Hall at 4:15. Professor Anning
will speak on Integral Distances. Tea
at 4.
At the regular Seminar meeting of
the Department of Chemical and
Metallurgical Engineering on Thurs-
day, Jan. 18, at 4 p.m. in Rm. 3201 of

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

WANTED
WANTED: Dates for Ships Ball. All
nice girls! Call 24561, room 483.
You may meet girls on request.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold diamond and rubies
ring. Reward. Call 6961 or 2-4
2521 ext. 307.
LOST: Black Schaeffer pen, Jan. 10,

A

-----

III

LAST TIMES
TODAY
wiA

Continuous from 1 P.M.

IIF
Mvich~igan.

Ad

Playing through
Wednesday

THE GAYEST...
MER RIEST ...
PICTURE OF THE YEARI
0UR HEAUSAERE b

Friday, Jan. 19, 8:30 P.M.
QUARTET IN D MAJOR, K. 499 .
QUARTET . . . . .
QUARTET IN C-SH1ARP MINOR, V01. 131
Saturday, Jan. 20, 2:30 P.M.
QUARTET IN G MAJOR, OP. 18, No. 2
QUARTET No. 7, OP. 96 . . . ,
QUARTET IN A MINOR, OP. 51, No. 2
Satu..av.. Ja.. 20. 8E0 PA.

. . . Mozart
Samuel Barber
. Beethoven

-De/ho y'n
Ernst Krenek
. Brahms

140

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He ,-.. ..

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1 1

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