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December 29, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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Face

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7akinyt/e eC'un t
By DAVE LOEWENBERG
Associate Sports Editor
BIG TEN cage coaches are already beginning to rack their brains in an
effort to figure out a way of stopping Iowa's high-geared scoringj
machine.
THE HAWKEYES are undefeated in five games and have amassed 376
points to 192 for their adversaries. This top-heavy record shows
victories over such stalwarts as Notre Dame (by 17 points), Denver (by 23),
and Nebraska (by 16). Even more important than this is the statement
by the genial Iowa mentor, "Pops" Hanison, "that his team has still not
reached its potential scoring peak."
IOWA goes after number six this week against Michigan State prepara-
tory to their Big Ten opener against Minnesota the following week.
fHIEF COG in the Iowa attack is sophomore Dick Ives. Last yearj
as a freshman Ives captured the Big Ten scoring crown with 208
points and his 327 points in 18 games established a new lawkeye scor-
ing mark. Against the lowly Maroons, Ives' 43 points set an all-time
conference high for a single game. Ives again leads the scoring race
with 84 points in five games to date..
IVES IS particularly adept at shooting with either hand and his scoring
prowess makes him almost a one-man team. However, this year Ives
will have adequate support from a pair of brothers, Clayton and Herbert
Wilkinson, each a former star on University of Utah squads. Co-captains
Jack Spencer and Ned Postels complete the Iowa starting five.
ONE POINT in the last 70 seconds of the final game of the campaign
cost Iowa a share of the Conference title last year. Ives sparked the
Hawkeyes last year along with Dave Danner who is now is service, but
with Ives going full blast and a new brothe- combination to boot, look out
for the team on the other side of the Mississippi.
A LITTLE post mortem on the Michigan-Wyoming game, which.
the Wolverines won, 38-33. One of Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's
chief problems this year has been a lack of height, but in defeating
the Wyoming quintet which averaged 6.'4" and included a 6'9" center,
the question of whether Michigan can cope with a big team is not as
obscure as before.
INCIDENTALLY, if you're a believer in comparative scores, give Michi-
gan the nod over Ohio in the game tomorrow. Ohio and Wyoming
both lost to Kentucky by four points, while the Wolverines topped the
cowboys by five.
'M WINS OPENER:o
New Years Da Grid lassics
Lively 1with 1Enchatinlg Atics

Tomorrow Nght
Quintet To Oppose Ohio
InConference Oene
j Hoopsters Defeat Wyoming Cagers, 38-33;
Vie with Bucks for Eighth Straight Victory
By BILL MULLENDORE
Victors in seven straight contests topped off by an impressive 38-33
triumph over Wyoming last Saturday, Michigan's cagers swing into
Western Conference action tomorrow night against a highly-rated Ohio
State quintet, defending Big Ten titlists.
The Wolverines had little difficulty in polishing off the tall but inex-
perienced Wyoming five to run their victory string to seven. Paced by
guard Walt Kell's 21-point scoring spree, Michigan took command during
the first three-quarters of the game and then withstood a last-minute
Cowboy rush to protect the winning margin.
Despite the victory over the towering Wyoming five, however, the
Wolverines will enter the Ohio State fracas as definite underdogs. Coach
H. G. Olsen's five, composed entirely of veterans from the squad which
dropped only two of 12 Big Ten tilts last sea on while grabbing the cham-
pionship, is just as tall as the Cowboy quintet and has the advantage of
collegiate experience.
ican quarter- Four of the five starters in the'-
Calif., for the Buckeye lineup, which averages a wyominf xtededthe Ti it o

IIORVATH DRILLS WITH EAST SQUAD-With Leslie Horvath, Ohio State All-Amer
back on hand, the East All-Star football team begins a week of preparation in Santa Clara,

r

East-West game. Left to right:
nesota and Horvath.

Bob Kelly and Frank Dancewicz of Notre Dame, Vie Kublitski, Min-

Kell Is Leading BL
Point Getter O

IGHT FUTURE:
Wolverine Track Squad has
Nucleus of Seven Lettermen

Wolverine F-ve
Harder Is Second
In Team Scoring
Scoring 21 points against the Uni-
versity of Wyoming cagers Saturday
night, Walter Kell, Michigan guard,
boosted his seven-game total to 56
points to take the lead in the indi-
vidual scoring race for the Wolver-
ines.
Kell, who has registered 23 field
goals and ten free throws this sea-
son, is closely followe in the stand-
ings by Keith Harder, who held the
lead until Saturday's game. Harder
trails the Kankakee, Ill., boy by just
two points and has scored the same
number of field goals as Kell.
Otherwise, the scoring is evenly
distributed among the regulars, with
John Mullaney in the third spot with
42 points, followed by Ted Berce with
38 and Don Lindquist with 30.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's charges
have scored 277 points so far, an av-
erage of 39.5 per game.
The individual scoring follows:

I
E

Early indications are that the
University of Michigan track squad
with seven lettermen back as al
nucleus again will have a greater
portion of its strength concentrated
in the distance and middle distance
events.
Ledby the Hume twins, Ross, 1945
captain and Bob, who led the team
last season and Richard Barnard,
letterman from Williamsville, N.Y.,
the Wolverines will be strong in the
mile and the 880-yard run.
Coach Ken Doherty is planning
to move the Humes down to the
880-yard event and Barnard to the
quarter mile to better balance the
team strength. Bob Hume has
done 4:14.9 indoors for the mile
and Ross has covered the indoor
mile in 4:15.9. Both are capable of
running a fast half mile, while
Doherty believes that Barnard,

whose half mile indoor mark is
1:57.5, can run a creditable 440.
To keep Wolverine strength up tot
par in the longer events, Doherty is1
counting on Archie Parsons, civiliant
transfer from New York University
and the return of Walter Fairservice,
both in the mile, and upon the show-
ing of Freshman Bob Thomason of1
Asbury Park, N.J., and Ross Willard,
Ashland, Ore.
Two lettermen, Charles Birdsall
and George Vetter, also are available
for the two-mile and the 880, respec-
tively.
Additional lettermen on the
squad include Julian Witherspoon,
sophomore, who prepped at Detroit
Northern and has covered the in-
door 60-yard dash in :06.4 and
Richard Forestel, who finishedI
fourth in the conference indoor
440-yard event last winter.

cool 6 ft. 4 in. in height, are mem-
bers of last winter's first team, and
the fifth man is a letter winner of
two years' ago.
At forwards are Don Grate, an
all-Conferenced performer, and
Jack Dugger, the same pair that
led the way to the title in 1943-44.
The center position is held down
by towering Arnie Risen,6 ft. 9 in.
of backboard dynamite who was
named to more than one All-Amer-
ican at the close of last season.
At one guard is Paul Huston, an-
other veteran, and at the other is
James Sims, the only new face in
the lineup. Sims was a member of
the 1942-43 starting five.
In addition, the Buckeyes are well-
stocked with reserve talent. For-
ward Rodney Caudill, center Bill
Pfeiffer, and guard Warren Amling,
-all capable, experienced players-
lead the parade in this department.
Despite the apparentdedgeen-
joyed by Ohio State, there are
several bright spots in the other-
wise gloomy picture. One is the
eligibility of center Dick Rifen-
burg, who saw his first action
against Wyoming. Wolverine coach
Bennie Oosterbaan characterized
the lanky Saginaw athlete as a
"fine prospect" but in need of ex-
perience and polish.
Another ray of hope was cast when

S~yL111111s tRLG11k V..,,,tts.6. V&±L. * LyU 1
Kentucky before going down, 50-46.
nosed out Ohio State, 50-48 in over-
time. But on the other side of the
The Kentuckians had previously
ledger the Bucks boast an impres-
sive win over Utah, a, contender for
national honors last year. They also
decisively trounced Michigan State,
53-31.
A third factor in Michigan's chan-
ces centers around the steady im-
provement of the Wolverine squad
in the seven games played to date.
Coach Oosterbaan's charges, have
displayed a lot of spirit and have
played an aggressive, heads-up brand
of ball which has payed off in the
win column.
Nevertheless, Ohio State will take
the floor in the favorite role, owing
to the experience and height of the
squad. The Bucks downed Michi-
gan twice last season, 53-49 and 53-
39.
BUcks Beat Spartans
EAST LANSING, Mich. Dec. 28 (4F)
-Ohio State University's experienc-
ed basketball team tonight defeated
Michigan State college 67 to 31 for
its second win of the season over
the Spartans and their third victory
in four starts.

By FRITZ HOWELL
Associated Press Correspondent
NEW YORK, Dec. 28-Some en-
chanting antics have enlivened Am-
erica's New Year's Day grid clas-
sics, but the one the fans will never
forget is California Roy Riegels'
wrong-way run in the Rose Bowl.
A decade and a half have passed
into pigskin history since the Gold-
en Bears' star center snagged a
Georgia Tech fumble and raced 74
yards toward his own goal-in-
stead 6f toward Tech's-before be-
ing dragged down of the one-yard
line by teammate Benny Lom.
On the next play Lom's attempted
punt from the end zone was blocked
for a safety, and the two points gave
Georgia Tech an 8-7 victory.
Riegels, heart-broken over the
"Corrigan"I run, came back the next
year to captain the Bears and play
outstanding ball. In explaining the
wrong-way incident, Riegels said:
"After picking up the fumble some-
body shoved me and I bounced right
off into a tackler. In pivoting to get
away from him, I completely lost my
bearings."
Many oddities cropped up( in
Bowl Games both before and after
that historic Riegels incident of
1929, and new ones are expected
in next Monday's frays.
Among Rose Bowls high spots were:
1902-Michigan's Neal Snow scored
five touchdowns in opening classic,
Wolves won 49-0, and the Bowl fold-
ed until 1916; 1925-Stanford's Ernie
Meyers gained more yards than the
four horsemen combined, but Elmer
Layden scored three touchdowns and
Notre Dame won 27-10; 1935-Ala-
bama set one-period scoring record
with 22 in second stanza against
Stanford as Dixie Howell completed
10 of 13 passes, the majority to Don
Hutson; 1939-Southern Cal came
up with outstanding last-minute win
over DFuke, 7-3, as Doyle Nave, re-
serve quarterback, completed four
straight passes, the last to Al Kreu-
ger for a touchdown; 1943-injured
Frankie Sinkwich of Georgia went in
to score winning touchdown against
Ucla after Charley Trippi had car-
ried the ball into scoring position.
The Sugar Bowl's biggest od-
dity came in the 1935 inaugural
when Temple lost to Tulane, 20-14.,
The winning touchdown came in
i AN IMPORTANT I
WEEK-END
i SUGGESTION
FLOWERS will add that cer-
tain festival touch to this im-
hortant I~ek-ed - - . 4thatwill

the last period when Mintz of Tu-
lane threw a pass near the Temple
goal. The ball would have fallen
hazmlessly in the end zone, but
Mowry, Temple back, batted it
straight into the arms of end Har-
dy of Tulane for the game-wreck-
ing touchdown.
The Orange Bowl has offered: 1937
-Duquesne eked out a 13-12 win
over Mississippi State in the last
three minutes on a 70-yard pass from
Boyd Brumbaugh to Ernie Hefferle.
Brumbaugh couldn't throw a pass
that far, but just as he cocked his
right arm he was spun by his left
arm by Fred Walters, opposing end.
The added momentum, and a favor-'
able wind, did the trick; 1939-Ten-
nessee Bowden Wyatt's attempted
placement for extra point against
Oklahoma hit the Vol center in the
stern, bounded back into Wyatt's
arms, and he circled end for the
point; 1941-Billy Jefferson of Mis-
sissippi State caught his :wn punt
against Georgetown. The kick went
almost straight up, hit the ground
several yards in front of the kicker,
took a crazy hop and spun back into
Jefferson's arms like a Yo-Yo.

II

Player G
Walter Kell ......
Keith Harder,... .
John Mullaney ....
Ted Berce ...... .
Don Lindquist.
Bill Gregor.......
Don Lund.......
Morris Bikoff.

ames FG FT TP

7 23 10
7 23 8
7 16 10
7 15 8
7 13 4
7 8 8
5 4 2
4 4 2

56
54
42
38
30
24
10
10

.7Ze"

A

t. , ..
.+
q ~
"4 ";" e

Horvath Injured
SAN FRANCISCO-()-Les Hor-
vath, triple-threat Ohio State All-
America halfback who reported late
because of college examinations, is
on the injured list with the twentieth
annual East-West football, classic
only five days away.
However, both Horvath, whose
ankle is damaged, and Jack Mead,
205-pound end from Wisconsin, who
has a knee ailment, worked out with
their East teammates in an indoors
practice, at the University of Santa
Clara gymnasium.

i}1 as.

Start the NEIV YEAH RIGHT!
Enjoy a Turkey, Chicken, or Steak Dinner
of our traditionally fine quality.
AND COME EARLY, PLEASE,
SO WE MAY SERVE YOU IMMEDIATELY.
T7E SUGAR BOWL
CHAMPAGNE with your dinner, if you wish.
FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL 2-1414

YOUR
NEW YEAR'S DINNER
at the
LIBERTY CAFE
No Reservations Needed
613 EAST LIBERTY

WISHING YOU
A HAPPY
NEW YEAR
Compliments of
LEO PI NG'S Lunch
808 South State

Buy War Bonds
and Stamps

WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE! DAY OR NIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M. I
TODAY AND

i
f

' 1
I

Celebrate

New

Year

HURON
HOTEL
and
RESTAU RANT
200 East Huron

Day
with Dinner

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C/ '
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tl p a
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9 a
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" ;
n .
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d is , . b "
i ao f0'
Q Q

GEORGE'S PLACE
1104 South University

lii - --

SRing the

New Year in
The,

WATCH SUNDAY'S DAILY
for our
SP¢cilC fle ?/ear'3 nlent

1 ~ 7 CHALESE DOIURN U

1

III

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