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May 16, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIICHIGAN DAIEY

Michigan GradIsAuthor
Of WorldPeace Proposal

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THE PACIFIC WAR-Numbers locate points where Allies are biting pieces from Japan's empire (black
areas) in the Pacific war. The heaviest fire-bomb raid of the war (1) hit Nagoya, Americans gained in
their southward drive on Okinawa (2), Chinese took Sinchang (3) and were on the outskirts of Foochow,
British (4) had cleared Rangoon and were preparing to drive east and south, in the Philippines (5)
Americans drove toward a juncture northwest of Davao, Allies were completing the mopup of Tarakan
(6) and Australian troops captured Wewak (7).
GAMES FOR NIP PRISONERS:
Yanks Watch Japanese Wrestling Matches

By BOB GOLDMAN
"In order that America's scienti-
fic skills be dedicated to advancing a
better life among nations," Ensign
Gilbert Anderson, '36 Lit., now serv-
ing in the Pacific, has prepared the
olan, "The Use of Science in the
Peace."
His program with its workers
drawn largely from universities
would involve the creation of "The
Institute of Foreign Service" estab-
lished for the purpose "of bring-
ing American Science to bear upon
world problems and to share in
the humanitarian contributions of
other nations'"
Purposes of the Foreign Service
Institute, a United States govern-
ment peace foundation, would be
threefold: first, the creation and
maintenance of ten thousand "for-
eign service fellowships" annually,
to use scientifically-trained person-
nel in a cooperating civilian service
with other nations.
Under this provision, U. S. ex-
perts would participate in overseas
medical service, : public works in-
stallation, dental aid, social wel-
fare, and teaching.
Second part of the plan would
have a "small group of ec.onomists,
political scientists, and sociologists
conduct a continual research and
appraisal of 'festering areas' of the
world."
This staff, like the other, using
r iirely scientific methods, would
detect uprisings before they had
taken root and would recommend
remedial controls "through the
proper channels of the United
States government."
Third and final step in the program
is the establishment of a 'good will
fund' to be integrated with the work
of the foreign service program.
This fund of approximotely $25,-
000,000 annually would be used for
the construction and demonstra-
tion projects such as schools, hos-
pitals, and laboratories, "which
would serve both a humanitarian
, and a teaching function."
"Construction of buildings would
be the responsibility of the recipi-
ent nation," Ensign Anderson points
out, "but direction of the program
would rest with the foreign service
workers during the demonstration
period."
With the university scholarship,
program, relatively untapped, he
says, there lies a great opportunity
for its development as an instru-
ment of .;furthering peaceful ad-
vancement of nations.
"The world is a 'laboratory' for
study," Ensign Anderson declared.
"Its possibilities for exploration are
without limit. Leadership of a dem-
ocratic nation is necessary to main-
tain freedom among men, and to
help all nations grow dpmocratic-
ally."
"Through the joint efforts of
the Foreign Service Institute, the

State Department, and participat-
ing foreign governments, exchange
fellowships, interneship fellow-
ships, and travel and study schol-
arships must be inaugurated," he
states.
Scientists for this program would
be recruited from colleges, universi-
ties and professional organizations.
Teachers, physicians, dentists, scien-
tists, engineers and social welfare
workers would be recipients of the
fellowships," he asserts.
Included in the fellowships would
be money stipends for students
awarded scholarships and fellow-
ships.
"Through contact with the
people of other lands, we would
break down many feelings of
strangeness and suspicion, while at
the same time we would have a
better knowledge of our neighbors'
customs, beliefs and ideologies,"
Ensign Anderson explains.
Ensign Anderson, who sent his
plan to an Ann Arbor acquaintance,
received his master's degree in 1944
in the field of public administration.
A resident of Detroit, he is a member
of Phi Kappa Phi and Alpha Nu.
Keiston. .
(Continued from Page 1)
ald Kinsey, Helen Elizabeth Kit-
chen, Edith Kohn, Richard Koppitch,
Ruby J. Kuhlman, and Margaret
Laubengayer.
List of Students Continues
The list continues with: Rose Les-
sin, Bei-tsung Li, Sarah Lickly, HIua
Lin, Hsu Lo, Muriel McAlister, Henry
McDermaid, KatherinerMcGinnis,
Imelda McIntyre, Robert McWil-
liams, Bernard Mason, -Natalie Mat-
tern, Max Matteson, Wayne Middle-
ton, Karyl Miner, Violet Misekow,
Margaret Myers, Loraine Naum,
Mary Neuroth, Edith Omer, Margery
Owen, Deborah Parry, John Peter-
son, Evelyn Phillips, Fred Poettmann,
Kenneth Potee, Charles Presnell,
Vincent Price, Antoinette Purpus, El-
eanor Putney, Dorothy Rahm, Billy
Ray, Arthur Rice, Harold Richard-
son, Ernest Robinson. James Rom-
bach, Joan Ruff, Mrs. Betty Rup-
pert, Naomi Schur, Albert Shachman,
Loraine Shepard, Ruth Silva, Helen
Simpson, Maurice Sinnott, Ruth
Smith, Sarah Smythe, Bette Soper,
Alfred Srere, Susan Stacy, Harry
Steinhauser, Oriel Straehley, Ralph
Strem, Elizabeth Swift, Ann Ter-
brueggen, Helen Thrasher, Edmund
Thorne.
The list concludes with: Donald
Vance, Doris Vanderbilt, Jack Ver-
schoor, Martha Walker, Catherine
Weaver, Joan Walker, David Wend,
William Westmaas, J. D. Wheeler,
Charles Williams, Ernest Williams,
Robert Wiltse, ' Clarence Winchell,
Lester Wolfson, Mary Worsham, Jes-
se Wright, William Wunch and Hui-
Lan Yeh.

I

By RICHARD C. BERGHOLZ
Associated Press Correspondent
LEYTE, P. I-"Sort of makes you
wonder, doesn't it?" the young officer
murmured as we watched the two
husky Japanese prisoners of war
grunting and tugging as they wrestl-
ed in front of us.
"A couple of days or weeks ago,
these two Japs were trying to kill
our Yanks by any means they could.
One of those boys was a volunteer in
the vaunted Nip suicide squad.
Japs Appear Happy
"Now here we sit watching this
wrestling match in this stockade.
Look at the faces of those Japs sitting
there in the sand. All those men are
supposed to believe the greatest
thing that can happen to them is
to die for their emperor. And that
the greatest misfortune and disgrace
is to fail and to fall prisoner to the
Americans.
"Look at them now. Do you think
they're unhappy and dejected, at
least at this particular moment?"
All around the 20-foot square of
soft sand crowded scores of Japa-
nese prisoners of war. As the wrestl-

ers strained, as the referee screamed
at them, as the brief bouts ended,
virtually every prisoner's face flashed
with excitement as he shouted, clap-
ped, laughed.
Prizes Given to Contest Winners
The 100-odd volunteer wrestlers
were divided into two teams. Each
had its followers. Hanging from
tent flaps was a big schedule of
events, printed in Japanese charac-
ters, of course. After every bout the
scorekeeper circled the winner's name
in bright red ink.
There were prizes of canned food,
cigarettes, fruit juice for winners of
the main events. Each winner made
his ceremonial bow and each was
loudly cheered by -his team support-
ers.
Sumo Is New Game
The game was called Sumo. Unlike
Judo, where there are no holds bar-
red, Sumo has very strict rules and
only by pulling, pushing, or tripping
can an opponent be thrown down or
out of the ring.
Often it's hard to tell who goes
out of the ring first. It's up to the

referee and some of his decisions
can be pretty unpopular. But dur-
ing the hour and one-half we watch-
ed the bouts, we saw no contestant
indicate any facial expression or
action resentment against the ref-
eree's decision.
Mozart Concert
Will, Be Given
The "Jupiter" symphony of Wolf-
gang Mozart conducted by Bruno
Walter, considered the greatest liv-
ing interpreter of Mozart, will be
performed at the Student Religious
Association Music Hour at 7:30 p.m.
EWT (6:30 p.m.) today at Lane Hall.
A discussion of Mozart as a com-
poser, his symphonies in general and
the "Jupiter" symphony (C Major)
in particular will be led by Les He-
tenyi, director of the SRA music
committee.
An analysis of the four movements
and of the playing of the music will
also be included in the discussion.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1945
(Eastern War Time)
7:00-News.
7:05-Morning Round-Up.
7:30-Musical Reveille.
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
9:00-News.
9:05-Goodyear's Music Box.
9:30-Community Calendar.
9:45-Lean Back and Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remembrance.
10:15-What Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Popular Vocalist.
11:15-Parson's Grist Mill.
11:30-Farm and Home Hour.
12:00-News.
12:15-Milt Herth.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Luncheon Melodies.
1:00--News.

1:05-Hollywood Reporter.
1:15-Vocally Yours.
1:30-Lawrence Welk.
1:45-Ellen Mitchell-Al & Lee Reis-
er.
2:00-News.
2:05-Bob Chester.
2:15-Johnny Green.
2:45-Round Towners.
3:00-Baseball Brev.
3:10-Baseball (Det. at Phila.)
5:00-News.
5:05-Campus Ballroom.
5:45-Sport Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-Albert Wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Piano Interlude.
6:55-Flashes from Life.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Band of the Week.
7:30-Evening Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:05-Irene Schwoco.
8:15-Put and Take It.
8:30-U. of M. Band.

PlCTUR C O A COED ABOUT TO CALL CHICAGO

2
HEARS OPERATOR SAY -
"PLEASE IM IT YOUR CALL TO 5 MINUTES"

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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REALIZES SHIE MAY BE ON WAR-BUISY LINE:

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LOST AND FOUND
BROWN PLAID SUIT SKIRT lost
between S. University and E. Uni-
versity. Call 2-1146. Reward.
FOUND: "A lovely way to spend an
evening" at Soph Music Bar this
Saturday.
WANTED
WANTED: Book on "How To Under-
stand Women." Contact D. R. Ad-
dison or J. R. Milillo, Allen Rum-
sey House.
FOR SALE

HELP WANTED
WANTED: (1) assistant cook and
(2) dish washer for boy's summer
camp in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.
Write giving experience, salary
desired, etc. to Teton Valley Ranch,
care Cranbrook School, Bloomfield
Hills, Michigan.
WANTED: Student, either sex to
drive car during summer session
for room and breakfast. A. E.
Woodward, 1101 Natural Science
Bldg.
FOR RENT

SAYS CHEERFULLY -"I'LL BE GLAD TO'

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