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April 27, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY GE T

Thincliads

Cam paign

To

Defeat

Linksmen
E~ tr
Encounter
Ohlo State
1944 Golf Champs
Face First Big Ten
Rivalry Tomorrow
Encountering their first Big Ten
opposition of the season, Michigan
linksmen, holders of the 1944 golf
title, will tee off against the Ohio
State squad tomorrow at Columbus.
Coach Bill Barclay has selected
a six-man team to make the trip in
the Wolverines' quest for their ini-
tial Conference victory. The five
golfers who took part in last week's
decisive triumph over the University
of Detroit 15%-21/2, Capt. Paul 0'-
Hara, John Jenswold, Phil Marcel-
lus, John Tews, and Bob Ernst, and
one newcomer Ken Morey will com-
Pose the Maize and Blue force in the
Buckeye tilt.
Wolverine Split in 1944
Last year Michigan golfers faced
the Ohioans twice, losing the first
contest 12-6 and avenging the loss
later in the season with a 16-2 win
over their, opponents. But the 1945.
Ohio club is reported to be a much
stronger team with three victories
in as many starts, and all by large
margins, recorded so far this season.
Coach Bob Kepler's charges have
chalked up wins over the Alumni
39/2-14/2, Lockbourne Air Base 24-3,
and Oberlin College 10/-11/2.
Tomorrow's match with the Buck-
eyes will mark the twenty-fourth time
that these two teams have met on
the links, and also this season will
mark Barcday's charges try for their
fourth consecutive Conference cham-
pionship.

Michigan Nine To
Wolverine Baseball Team Plays
In Non-Big Ten Tilts This Week
Next Home Games Feature Minnesota Squad;
May Be Deciding Series of '45 Ball Season

Play at South Ben

Ten-Year Jinx
d iih iganRelay Quartes
T PRun at Philadelphia
Doherty's Tracksters Entered in Distance
Medley, Four-Mile, Two-Mile, Half-Mile

IJtakfin9 the 4Suh 44
By HANK M ANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

1
t

By BILL LAMBERT
Coach Ray Fisher's baseball team,
which at the present time is leading
the rest of the Conference in the
title race, leaves this afternoon at
2:00 for South Bend, where they will
meet the Irish of Notre Dame in two
non-Big Ten contests.
After being successful in six out
of seven starts, the Wolverine nine
will be tuning up for the following
Batting Leaders

PLAYER, CLUB G AB R
Mayo, Tigers . .. .6 24 7 1
Holmes, Braves . .8 34 8 1
Ilockett, W. Sox 5 23 4 1
lSickshct, W. Sox 5 23 3 1
Ott, Giants......9 28 11 1
O'Brien, Pirates 6 21 1
Runs Batted In
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Lombardi, Giants ..........
Nienan, Braves ...........
Weintraub, Giants........
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Etten, Yankees .............
Dsrry, Yankees .............

1I
10
12
9

Pet.
.458
.441
.435
.435
.429
.429

weekend, when Minnesota, the power-
house club, comes to Ann Arbor, in
what may be the deciding series of
the season.
Only 14 men are slated to make the
trip to South Bend, and the Navy
ruling will necessitate some changes
in the line-up for Saturday. Three
pitchers, Bo Bowman, who is back
in shape after pulling a back muscle,
Jack Peddy, who saw action against
Grosse Ile, and Ray "Red" Louthen,
will do the chucking for the Maize
and Blue.
Louthen, who will undoubtedly
have to be back on campus Saturday,
will take to the mound in the first
tilt, and either Bowman or Peddy
in the second. Besides the first 8
regulars, only three reserve players
are on the traveling squad.
This means that the Michigan line-'
up will have Bob Stevenson doing
the receiving, Tom Rosema at first,
Dominic Tomasihat second, Jack
Weisenburer at short, and Walt Kell
on third. The outfield will remain
the same with Bill Gregor, Don Lund,
and Bill Nelson covering the deep
territory.
Not much news has come out of
the Notre Dame camp, but going by
past Irish squads, the Wolverines will
not be engaging in any breather. The
Notre Dame club upset Michigan last
year in a contest on the former's
diamond.
Going into this weekend's tilts, first
sacker Rosema is leading the Wolver-
ine power at the plate with a .357
average. Walt Kell is the only other
regular who is batting over the .300
mark, and is in possession of a .308
average.
The rest of the team averages are
as follows:

14
12
.. 9
9

ONE OF BASEBALL'S most important questions of the year-who would
succeed the late Kenesaw Mountain Landis as ruler of the game-f
was decided early this week; and the five-month quest for a commissionerX
ended with the selection of Senator Albert B. (Happy) Chandler, who
will become the second such commissioner since the office first originated
in 1920.1
The commissioner's position in which Landis directed baseball for 23t
years has been vacant since Nov. 25 of this year, when the former Federal1
judge passed away suddenly.
His choice was made unanimous by the 16 club owners, who had 1
convened for this reason, on the final ballot, after- Bob Hannegan,1
chairman of the National Democratic Committee, had given him the
main opposition. Chandler has now been installed for a seven year
term at an annual salary of $50,000.l
Jack Zellar, General Manager of the Tigers, said that Comdr. Harold
Stassen was heavily favored for the position by all of the club owners,
but the fact that he wasn't available for the present season, dampened
the hopes of his being selected for the job.
jOME of the most prominent men mentioned for the Commissioner's;
post included James A. Farley, J. Edgar Hoover, John W. Bricker,
Paul V. McNutt, Gov. Frank J. Lausche of Ohio, Bob Hannegan and
President Ford Frick of the National League. That Chandler should emerge
victorious over such stiff competition was undoubtedly due to his interest and
previous participation in the game.
He has supported baseball for a long time, and last January, when
the elimination of all sports seemed probable, the Kentucky Senator went
on record as saying:
"I think baseball should have the right to use men who have been
rejected for service, if that would mean keeping the game going,"
THE FORMER senator from the Blue Grass Country also played semi-
pro ball, and had mediocre seasons with Trafton in the Red River
Valley League, from whence he attended Harvard Law School and then
embarked into law and politics, which has given him national promi-
nence.
His last affiliation in baseball came when he was assistant athletic
coach at Centre College, which is largely remembered for the football
days when "Bo" McMillin and the immortal "Prayin' Colonels" made
grid history.
Most of the comments by the various league owners to the choice of
Chandler as Commissioner have been extremely favorable, and this vote
pf confidence by the "big wigs" should enhance the possibilities of his
complete success.

By BILL MULLENDORE
Two Michigan relay quartets are
scheduled to toe the mark against
the nation's finest track talent today
at Philadelphia in the opening events
of the Penn Relays as the Wolverines
begin their campaign to end the ten-
year jinx which has prevented them
from winning more than two first
places as the annual Eastern cinder
attraction.
Today's program finds Coach Ken
Doherty's charges entered in the dis-
tance medley and sprint medley re-
lays. The four-mile, two-mile, mile,
and possibly the half-mile relays, will
keep the 11-man Wolverine squad
busy tomorrow, as well as two indi-
vidual events, the 100-yard dash and
the pole vault.
The distance medley, in which
Michigan will be favored to defend
successfully its championship won
last year, will find Bob Mann, Bob
Thomason, Archie Parsons, and Bob
Hume running for the Wolverines.
Bill Shepherd, Val Johnson, Julian
Witherspoon, and Ross Hume will
do the honors in the sprint medley.
First scheduled event on tomor-
row's card is the half-mile relay in
which the Wolverines are not defi-
nitely entered. Coach Doherty will
Sbase a last-minute decision, on
whether to place a team in this race
on the quality of competition of-
fered.
Next scheduled event is the four-
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Cramer, Tigers ..................
Hayes, Athletics .............. .
Home Runs
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Weintraub, Giants ..............
Lombardi, Giants ...............
Nieman, Braves .................
AMERICAN LEAGUE
L rry, Yankees.................
Hayes, Athletics ................
Eight players tied.

7
7
3
3
3
2
2

I

Ann Arbor High ISchool
presents
I...Pinafore
by Gilbert & Sullivan
April 27 and 21;
High School Auditorium
35c and 50c 8:5 P.M
Please remember
ARROW SHIRT

Galehouse Signs Up
CLEVELAND, April 26-(YP)-Denny
Galehouse, who hurled the St. Louis
Browns to a victory in the opening
game of last year's World Series, was
accepted for the Navy at the induc-
tion station today and ordered to re-
port to the Great Lakes Naval Train-
ing Center tonight.
The 33-year-old right hander did,
not report to the Brown's this spring
but remained on his job at the Good-
year Aircraft Corp. at Akron. He
won nine and lost ten for the Ameri-
can League champions last season.

Redmond, 2b
Soboleski, s
Ponsetto, lb.
Rosema, lb
Peddy, p
Hackstadt, lb
Kell, 3b .
Gregor, if .
Nelson, rf..
Lund, of ..
Stevenson, c
Louthen, 1)
Bowman, 1p
To nasi, 2,b
Weisenburger,
Marckward, p

ABR
3 0
..14 3
90o
.... 23 3
.. . . 22 5
. . ..23 2
19 2
..16 3
ss ...25 1
. 1 0

LI
1
1
2
3
G
5
5
4
1
.,
,2
(1

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.66'7
,357
333
.303
.261
.22'7
.217
.211
.156
.156
.125
:120
.000

TEAMS
New York.
Philadelphia
Detroit .....
Washington.
St. Louis ...
Cleveland

W L
5 0
5.2
.. . . . .. . . . . .4 2
-.. ........- .. - 4 3
.2 5
.1 5
..... ,..... .0 7

I

B.A.A.-BLACK SHEEP !!
Storms, 'See gars', Senilfity
Seldom Squelch Marathons
By BUD ROVIT
Last April 19, a thoroughly be-sweated and fatigued character, in
running pants and knotted handkerchief, gasped his way through the
thronged streets of intown Boston, up Exeter, to break the tape in front
of the Boston Athletic Association Building, to complete the running of the
umpteenth annual Boston Marathon.
This man, one Jounic Kelley of Worcestr, Mas n the grueling
twenty-six mile, three hundred-eighty-five yard course, in approximately
two hours and thirty minutes,-for a

Pct
1.000
.714
.667
.571
.286
.167
.000
Pet.
.778
.714
.600
.500
.429
.421
.286
.250

NATIONAL

LEAGU)

WMM

Ii

TEiMS W
New York ........7
Chica-o ................5
St. Louis ..3
Holton .......... .......4
Cincinnati........... .
Brooklyn.............3
Pittsburgh .............2
Philadelphia ...........2

E
2
2
2
4
4
4

we like to sell

S just as well

as

you 1lke to buy them.

They remain

"tops" in value!
Available to you as released to us.
$224tip
W4M EIft

Garrison Examinied
PHILADELPHIA, April 26-P)--
Outfielder Ford Garrison of the Phil-
adelphia Athletics-reported for a pre-
induction examination today and was
absent from the starting lineup of
the Philadelphia Athletics, who op-
posed the New York Yankees at
Shibe Park.
Charley Metro replaced Garrison in
the A's lead-off position,
The Wayne-Michigan tennis
matches scheduled for yesterday
were postponed because o' rain,
and will be held next Monday at
3:00 EWT.

p!

~--

a
k

We Feel Bad
about Violets

PE

call the violet the .hrikig violet
about anything that shrinks but

Ntalrdust In
your Bon"?
We mean "captured stardust"
or Roger&Gallet dry perfumes
Just put some of this pow-
dered perfume between two
thin layers of cotton and ac-
tually tuck it in your"bonnet".
lt's the cutest surest way oF keeping
your favorite Roger & Gallet scent
with you all the time. Your hair will
be fragrant with "captured stardust."

quick-withering laurel wreath.
The annual Boston Marathon,
jwhich has been taking place since
God Knows When, is held every April
19, Patriots Day, in Boston, in com-
memoration of Don't Know His Name
Either who ran 26 miles, 385 yards,
from the plains of Marathon to the
Athenic arena, to announce a Greek
victory over the Persian hosts which
forever blocked any chance of a
Persian invasion of Greece.
These redoubtable runners spend
up to four months in advance train-
ing for the arduous distance. It
costs them five dollars entry fee in
the race. If they finish, they are giv-
en the privilege of a free shower and
supper under the auspices of the
B. A. A. If they manage to emerge
victorious from the race from the
other 150 contestants, they are given
in addition a laurel wreath.
Notwithstanding these seemingly
crazy arrangements, a surprisingly
large number (150) of ambitious mar-
athon enthusiasts enter this yearly
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
!Bought,
Rented,
Repaired.
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0 e. -ORRILL
314 South State St.

New England classic. Competitors
come from all over the country and
Canada to vie for the free B.A.A.
supper.
Then there's Joe "Cigars" Mur-1
phy, another Marathoner who has
almost become a legend. Murphy
never won a Marathon, but he fin-
ished ten of them, and here's the
point that makes him newscopy: In
each of the Marathons that he ran,
he used to smoke an average of eight
cigars en route-a living argument
against tobacco-abhorer, Gene Tun-
ney.
Marathons have been run in all
kinds of weather, from blinding
blizzards to zephyrous halcyon days.
In fact the record time for the
Marathon. was set by a Pawtucket
Indian, Town Longboat, in the worst
spring snowstorm that Boston has
ever seen. In fact the 1940 Mara-
thon, in which "Tarzan" Ellison
Brown of Providence beat out Ger-
ard Cote of Montreal and this self-
same Kelly by SIX YARDS, was
run in slashing sheets of rain, which
poured down with no let up all
the way from the stafting point in
H-opkinson to the tape across Exeter
Street.
The war has hindered the running
of the Marathon only a trifle. A pre-
dominance of service shirts was seen
among the runners but a goodly field
was at hand at Hopkinson. In fact,
although some people think its the
craziest sport ever invented, I my-
self firmly believe that there will be
Marathons as long as there are
scribes crazy enough to write about
them.

Chandler Lays
Down Law to
Lippy Durocher
WASHINGTON, April 26-UP)--
Baseball's new commissioner, Senat-
or Albert B. "Happy" Chandler, to-
day made his first decision . . . in
favor of Boston's Braves.
Leo Durocher, Brooklyn manager,
facetiously wired Chandler:
"Dutch Nieman hit ninth-inning
Iibmer that beat me (Tuesday). Here-
by file first protest. What do you
intend to do about it."
Chandler jokingly said he would in-
form Durocher that "my first deci-
sion is to give the game to Boston."
Nieman hit a homer with two men
on in the ninth inning of Tuesday's
game, giving the Braves an 8-6 vic-
tory.
BUY MORE BONDS

RING

POETS always
We feel bad

.
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9
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chiefly shirts.
So w cyespent our life
inakini; the shirt that dloesr;'
shrink, the Arrow shirt. ItsW
Sanforized-labeled, which
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collar is the word's fin_
Try an Arrow today!~

OPENING MAY FIRST
to serve
CO -ee I I doU- t4j
1 'A - A 4

free time worthwhile spent in
the active, out-of-doors way,
GROUP OF HANDSOME NEW HORSES

mi _EWYkIt

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