100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tilt MICHIGAN TINILY

rRTDAT, APRIL 27.,

THE MTCIICAN IAIV FID._ P.g ..

1.r t-S V L v/ y
®

Molotov Blocks tettinius lection

FIFTY-SECOND YEAR:
Ezio Pinza Will Open Annual
May Festival Series Thursday

Wants Four Chairmanships,
One for Each of Great Powers

their-power to solve this question. Of
course, it isn't an easy question.
"There is an excellent decision on
the question adopted at the Crimea
Conference. We shall carry it out
and facilitate theh s1ution of the
problem."
Earlier, Premier Stalin had com-.
municated his latest views on Poland
to the Russian delegation. It was
Stalin who drew up thetdecisions in
the Crimea with the late President
Roosevelt and Prime Minister Chur-
chill.
Eden Proposes Stettinius
A "steering committee," made up
of chiefs of delegations, was supposed
to have nominated a Conference
Chairman this morning. One dele-
gate reported that, in accordance
with the custom of selecting the
leader of the host country's repre-
sentatives for that honor, Foreign
Secretary Anthony Eden of Britain
at once proposed Stettinius.
Then, the delegate said, this is
what happened:
The Russian put in a request for
four chairmen.
A compromise was advanced that
would let the Big Four chiefs preside
in turn at plenary sessions of the
conference, and this was accepted
unanimously, as was Eden's proposal
that Stettiniusbecome chairman of
the steering and executive committee.
Mock United
Nations Parley
Plans Revealed
The agendas for the two panels to
constitute the Post - War Council
mock United Nations Conference
Saturday afternoon and evening n
the ABC Room of the Michigan
League were announced yesterday by
Elizbeth Hawley, council president.
The panel dealing with the disposi-
tion of enemy territories will be held
at 2 p.m. EWT and is entitled "Deal-
ing with Our Fallen Foes". In a dis-
cussion on Germany the delegates
will determine the division of guilt
among the people, the Nazi Party,
the Junkers and the industrialists.
They will also discuss the problem of
de-industrialization and the rebuild-
in of Germany as well as the future
partidipation of Germany in a world
order.
In reference to Italy problems to
be considered are the policy of the
United Nations toward fascistic ele-
ments, such as British rejection of
the anti-fascist Carlo Sforza, and the
rehabilitation of the Italian people.
Under Japan debate will center on
the determination of guilt for war
and war crimes, the status of the
emperor in new Japan, de-industri-
alization and rebuilding of the na-
tion, the problem of rehabilitation
and territorial provisions for the 800,-
000,000 Japanese.
The panel entitled "Erecting the
Bulwark of Peace" at 7:30 p.m. EWT
will center around the Dumbarton
Oaks proposals for a world organiza-
tion.
BUY WAR BONDS

Committees for
'Ces Dames'
Are Announced,
French Play Will Be
Presented Wednesday
"The committees for the French
play, 'Ces Dames aux Chapeaux
Velts', are working earnestly in prep-
aration for the presentation of the
comedy at 8:30 p.m. EWT Wednes-
day at the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter," Prof. Charles E. Koella of the
otmance Language department de-
lared yesterday.
Assisted by Barbara Hazelton on
the costume committee, Mrs. Sarah
Maycock, president of the Cercle
Francais, has charge of costumes, box
office and ushers. She will also act
as prompter.f

E

HITLER'S RETREAT NEAR BERCHTESGADEN-This is an airview
of Adolph Hitler's retreat near Berchtesga den, Germany, which was
the target of RAF Lancasters carrying loads of the six-ton "Earth-
quake" bombs. This picture of the retreat was made by the Medit-
erranean Allied Air Force. None of the buildings is identified.
iIle t

Prorarties and Make-Up
Chairmen of property and make-
up committees are Harriett Wilson
and Annette Chaikin, respectively.
Helping Miss Wilson are Alma Buck-
ner and Helen Katsoris. June Wil-
lard and Angela Pons will assist on
the make-up committee.
George Petrossian, Elizabeth Mit-
chell, and Pamela Wrinch are in
charge of making posters. The stage
crew Consists of Phil Chivikos, Stay-
ros Scourles, Gillbert Van Sickle, and
Brent Upson, with Jean Raine as
electrician. Music for the play will
be provided for by Carol Fries and
Lucretia Dell.
Reserved Seats on Sale
IRPservedl seats will le on sale frcm

Known as "the greatest singing
actor of his generation," Ezio Pinza,
Metropolitan basso, who has been
heard on previous Choral Union con-
cert series, will open the fifty-second
annual May Festival at 8:30 p. m.
EWT Thursday at Hill Auditorium
with familiar arias from Mozart's
"Don Giovanni," "The Magic Flute"
and selections from "Boris Godoun-
off."
"Rosenkavalier Suite"
Hadyn's "Symphony No. 80 in D
minor," the "Rosenkavalier Suite" by
Strauss and Weber's Overture to "Der
Freischutz" will be performed by
the Philadelphia Symphony Orche-
stra under the direction of Eugene
Ormandy.
Pinza has sung numerous roles in
more operas than any of the other
Metropolitan's principals. He can
sing any one of the 55 operatic roles
at a few hours' notice and is equally
effective as the swashbuckling Don
Giovanni, the diabolical Mephisto-
pheles or the clownish Don Basilio.
Levant To Play
Oscar Levant's performance of pop-
ular Gershwin selections, with the
Philadelphia Orchestra, will highlight
the second concert in the four day
series at 8:30 p. m. EWT next Fri-
day. Levant will play the "Concerto
in F major" for pianoforte and or-
chestra and Gershwin's beloved
"Rhapsody in Blue."I
The University Choral Union, con-
ducted by Prof. Hardin Van Deursen,
will also be heard on this program.
The "Chant of 1942" by Creston and
ppropriations
For U' Are Cut
By The Associated Press
LANSING, April 26-The 1945 Leg-
islature, once confident that it would
achieve its first daylight scheduled
adjournment in modern history, to-
night was still in session, battling in
conference commttees over a score
of unimportant controversies.
The Legislature took $900,000 off
the appropriations for state-support-
ed schools and colleges as one part
of its budget-balancing program.
That program cost the UNIVER-
SITY OF MICHIGAN $300,000 less
than it sought, a total of $5,867,451,
or $263,000 more than it spent this
year; Michigan State College, $100,-
000 less than it sought, a total of
$3,986,898, .$526,000 more than it
spent this year; and Wayne Univer-
sity and the junior colleges, $500,000
less than they sought, but still their
first share of state funds.

Cantata from "A Free Song" by the
contemporary young American com-
poser, William Schuman, will com-
prise the vocal group's selections.
The remaining concerts will be giv-
en at 2:30 p. m. and 8:30 p. m.. Sat-
urday and Sunday, May 5, 6.
Courthouse Clocks
'Set on Central Time
Court house clocks were set on
Central War Time Wednesday, ac-
cording to Luella M. Smith, county
clerk.
Employee work schedules, how-
ever, have also been set baclean hour,
running from 7:30 a.m.. to 4 p.m.
according to office clocks. The meas-
ure will affect all timepieces except
those in the office of the register of
deeds and in the treasurer's office,
which have been on "slow" time
since 1943.
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
Con utinous ffron 1 P.M.
- Today and Saturday --
SUSANNA
FOSTER
TURHAN t
BEY
ALAN
CURTIS
Andy DEVINE
Thomas GOMEZ
Also
CARTOON - NEWS
UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS
Coming Sunday
'CLAUDETTE COLBERT
FRED MacMURRAY
"PRACTICALLY YOURS"

2-5 p.m. EWT Monday; from 10
a.m.-G p.m. EWT, Tuesday and from
10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Wednesday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater box of-
fice. Holders of the tickets for the

I

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributions to this
column should be addressed to the Mili-
tary Editor, Michigan Daily, 426 May-
nard Street.)
First Lieutenant GEORGE R.
STAEBLER, a University graduate
and a resident of Ann Arbor, is a
member of the Twenty First Weather
Squadron of the Ninth Air Force
) vhich recently was awarded the
Meritorious Service Unit Plaque for
superior performance of duty in con-
nection with tactical operations prior
to and during the invasion of the
continent.
Lt. Staehler, a weather fore-
caster, assimiliates information
gathered by field detachments,
draws maps and forecasts the
rather. He has been overseas a
year.
Memorial services for Lieutenant
JOHN EDGAR NEARING, a jun-
ior at the University when he en-
tered Navy flight training in Ap-
ril, 1941, were held at Spuyten
Duyvil, N. Y. last Sunday. Lt
Nearing, a fighter pilot, was kill-
ed in action in the Pacific area,
January
Promotion to the rank of first lieu-
tenant of MILTON I. GOLDMAN,
another former student, has been
announced by the commanding gen-
eral of the Tenth Air Force in
Burma.
Lt. Goldman, who holds the Air
Regents
(Continued from Page 1)
stration of the University and by rep-
resentatives of the Foundation.
Returned veterans taking the new-
ly announced short course on business
management will be granted a cer-
tificate on the completion of the four-
months work, the Regents decided.
Contacts for engineering re-
search totalling more than $21,000
were approved by the Regents. Am-
ong the projects accepted were
wind tunnel work on airplane mod-
els, tests on the insulation value
of building panels and tests of al-
loy steels at high temperatures.
The Regents also announced pro-
motion of Associate Prof. Emerson W.
Conlon to professor of aeronautical
Engineering and chairman of the de-
partment. Now a commander in the
Navy, Prof. Conlon is serving as head
of the structural developing section
of the Bureau of Aeronautics in
Washington.
The Regents revealed that Maj.
Clark Hopkins will resume his ap-
pointment as Associate Professor of
Greek and Latin May 1. However, he
will devote his services to the Veter-
an's Bureau of the University until
November 1. While in the Army he
was in charge of the ASTP training
branch in Detroit and was informa-
tion and education officer at Camp
Ellis, Ill.
~~4~4ce

Medal, is a B-25 navigator with the
famous Burma "Bridge Busters"
squadron. He has 40 missions and
170 hours of combat flying time to
his credit.
Lieutenant FRITZ L. RADFORD,
a graduate of the University, has
been transferred from the Carlsbad
Army Air Field, Carlsbad. N. M., to
Las Vegas, Nev.
The Air Medal recently was award-
ed to Lieutenant ROBERT CRARY,
,R. "for meritorious achievement in
aerial flight while participating in
sustained operational activities
against the enemy."
Lt. Crary, an aeiial navigator
with a heavy bomber crew, is a for-
mer student of the University. He
is now stationed in Italy with the
Fifteenth Air 'Force.
Staff Sergeant NORMAN ZIT-j
RFEN, a graduate of 1940, was re-
cently promoted from the grade of
sergeant. He is an aerial gunner with
a veteran B-24 Liberator heavy bom-
bardment group of the Fifteenth Air
Force.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY_
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: A pair of glasses, gold
frame, in back of big fraternity,
Found Monday. Call 3427.
LOST: Boy's Macomber high school
ring. Initials K. A. K. on inside of
ring. Lost in State Theatre. Sen-
timental value. Reward. Call M.
M. Weeks. 2-2565.
FOUND: Schaeffer Lifetime pen
near Rackham. Contact D. Goris,
2-4200.
LOST: The chance of your life if
you don't see the Junior Girls' Pro-.
duction "TAKE IT FROM THERE".
Get your tickets now for fifty cents
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
box office for this musical comedy.
Friday, April 27th, and Saturday,
April 28th, 'Take It from There!'
WANTED: Boy to help another boy
in small league house. Easy work
and good pay. Telephone 4701.
LOST: Black, shell-rimmed glasses
Thursday morning. Reward. Call
Michigan Daily.
WANTED

current lecture series will get
duction in nrice of tickets,
Kcella, who is directing the
announced.

a re-
Prof.
play,

StVate Library
'Group To Me et
Will Discuss (eneral
Interest Problems
The annual spring meeting for
District 2 of the Michigan Library
Association will be held today at
Kellogg Auditorium with representa-
tives present from counties in south-
ern Michigan.
Problems of common interest and
concern will be discussed for the
purpose olb acquainting trustees and
librarians alike with general library
conditions disclosed planning com-
mittee chairman Agnes N. Tysse.
Philippines Is Topic
The fi st address of the meeting is
at 11 a.m. EWT by Mr. Alfredo T.
Morales who will talk on "New For-
ces of Freedom in the Philippines'.
Mr. Morales is a native of the Philip-
pines and since Pearl Harbor has
been connected with the Office of
War Information, making regular
broadcasts to the islands and work-'
ing-closely with representatives from
the Filipino government.
Samuel W. McAllister, Associate
Director of the University Library
here and member of planning com-
mittee, will speak at 2:30 p.m. EWT
on "Meeting the 1948 Deadline".
Vander Velde Will Speak
At the same session "The Preser-
vation of Local Records" will be the
subject of Prof. Lewis G. Vander
Velde, teacher of history at the Uni-
versity and director of the Michigan
Historical Collections. A visit to the
collections is on the program.
Fourth Shoe Stamp Will
Be Validated August 1
WASHINGTON, April 26-()-
The OPA announced tonight that a
new shoe ration stamp will be vali-
dated August 1.

I

NEED A VACATION?
TAKE IT ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
GO INTO THE COUNTRY!

PACK A LUNCH -
TAKE A BOOK -
TAKE A BLANKET -
We'll furnish the Bikes, Basket,
also help plan your route.
$1.00 ALL DAY

, 1
t '
- .
i , 1 ti

CAMPUSBIKE SHOP
25c An Hour $1.00 All Day

A

,

"Calm your anger
and quench your thirst
at the
CHATTE RBOX"
Corner Hill and State
OPEN TILL TWELVE

l
,.

WINES

4 MONTH INTENSIVE
Course for
College Students and Graduates
A tnorough, intensive course-start-
ing February, July, October.
Registration now open.
Regular day and evening school
throughout the year.Catalog.
A SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
PREFERRED BY COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN
THE GREGG COLLEGE
President, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Director. Paul M. Pair. M.A.
Dept:C. P. 6 N. Michigan Ave.
Chicago 2, Illinois
I1

GROCERIES - MEATS

WANTED: Everyone to come to the
Junior Girls' Play Friday, April"
27th, Saturday, April 28th in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 'Take
It from There.' Tickets, fifty cents,
on sale at the Theatre box office,
now.

The Toast of I

TODAY -and Saturday

Death That

Will Freeze

Your

Blood !

I I # I

l . I 12 1 v:

A

lei

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan