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March 25, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-03-25

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Michigan

Tinclads Capture Purdue Relays

TAKING IT EASY:
Tigers' Newhouser Foresees
'Only 20 Wins' Next Season

llafiing the ouni

By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

By FRANK KENESSON
Associated Press Correspondent
'EVANSVILLE, Ind., March 24 -
Blond, slender Harold Newhouser, ace
Detroit lefthander and the winning-
est pitcher of the Major Leagues in
1944, believes he won't duplicate his
29 victories this season-because he
"won't get enough work to win like
that."
"With our improved and streng-
thened pitching staff I'll be lucky
to pitch enough games to win 20. I'll
never win 29 again, probably not even
25-because T won't have to," the
23-year-old Junior Legion product
declared here at spring training camp.
Newhouser, who never before in a
Major League season won as many
games as he lost, piled up a won-lost
record of 29-9 in his first winning
year. But, like his workhorse team-
mate, Paul (Dizzy) Trout, he had to(
toil more than 300 innings of 47

games to do it, working out of turn
both as a starter and in relief.
"I'm glad to have that year behind
me," Newhouser said-and he meant
it. "I don't think all that work hurt
me; it probably did me much more
good than harm. But one season like
that is enough.
"This year we've got pitchers-
maybe five starters. If I keep in turn
I'll probably work an average of 5% /
times a month-that's 30 games. If I
win two for every one I lose-and I
should-that would be an even 20.
So there you are. How could I win
29?"
Newhouser started and won four
games in six days during the Tigers'
blistering September stretch drive
with the Browns last season. That's
as much as the American League's
strikeout king expects to work in a
month this year.

N

AS THE NOTRE DAME football team began spring training, not only
could the Irish gridders be termed green, but also Hugh Devore, who is
making his debut as the head football coach and athletic director, third
Notre Dame coach in as many years.
. Devore is a native of Newark, N. J., and while playing end on the
Dotre Dame 1931-'33 teams, he was rated as one of the greatest blockers
who ever put on grid togs at South Bend.
He was an All-State end while prepping in New Jersey. His
reason for being at Notre Dame when he had already picked Pennsyl-
vania as his future school was a visit by the legendary Knute Rockne,
who was head coach of the Irish at the time. Devore was a starting
end in his sophomore year' at Notre Dame, and was chosen co-captain
of the 1933 contingent.
The 34-year-old coach returned to his alma mater as a line coach in
1943 after spending 11 years in the coaching profession, being 'affiliated
with Providence College and Holy Cross, as well as spending three full
seasons as an assistant to Jimmy Crowley of Fordham. Devore is also
the fifth former Irish grid player since Rockne's tutelage to handle the
Notre Dame football fortunes.
AS DIRECTOR and head coach, Devore's stay in this capacity will termi-
nate upon the return of Lt. Frank Leahy, U. S. N. R., who recently
signed a long-term contract with the University.
With a tough 1945 schedule on hand, including such teams as Illinois,
Georgia Tech, Tulane, Army, Navy, Dartmouth, Northwestern and Great
Lakes, Devore has only four letter men on hand from the 30 gridders
"who comprised last year's ball club, which lost only to Army and Navy.
Devore is not only faced with a lack of experienced team personnel,
but few coaching staffs have been broken up more quickly and com-
pletely than the one which handled Notre Dame last year. Within a
short space of time, Ed McKeever accepted the bid to coach Cornell;
Adam Walsh is now with the Cleveland Rams and Clem Crowe just
recently signed as head coach at Iowa.
Hence, Devore will enter the big time coaching profession with not
merely a- few of the problems that usually confront a coach, but with
an additional number for good measure, and it will be interesting to note
the manner and the success with which he tries to solve his dilemma.
Phil Marcellus Celebrates Fourth
Season as Member of Golf Squad
Last Year's Captain Is Veteran of Three
Springs on Title-Winning Michigan Teams

FICTION

POOR CHILD - Anne Parish . . . . . . . $2.50
BLACK BOY - Richard Wright . . . . . . $2.50
APARTMENT IN ATHENS - Glenway Wescott . $2.50
EARTH ANP HIGH HEAVEN - Graham . . $2.50
CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE - Shellabarger . $3.00
HARD FACTS - Howard Spring . . . . . . $2.50
A TIME TO DIE - Hilda Lawrence . . . . $2.00

NON-FICTION

AMERICAN CHARACTER - Brogan. . . . $2.50
ESQUIRE FIRST SPORTS READER - Graffis . $2.75
DON'T BE AFRAID - By Cowles.. . . . . . $2.00
THURBER CARNIVAL - James Thurber . . . $2.75
ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN - Papashvily . . $2.00

NEW REPRINTS

RAZORS EDGE - Somerset Maugham . . .
BARNABY - Crockett Johnson . . . . . .
PAST IMPERFECT - Ilka Chase . . . . .

. $1.00
$1.00
$1.00

By RUTH ELCONIN
With "Old Man Weather" bringing
a premature spring to Ann Arbor,
several of the Wolverine golfers are
taking advantage of the early oppor-
tunity to begin practice for the 1945
season; and one person whom .you
will undoubtedly find on the links is
Phil Marcellus, one of the most con-
sistent and accurate players on the
squad.
Marcellus entered the University in
1940 and earned his freshman num-
eral playing tackle on the same team
that boasted the services of Tom
Kuzma, Paul White, and Julius
Franks. In his sophomore year, he
won his first varsity golf letter, also
getting one in football. In 1942 he
played guard on the varsity eleven.
In March of the following year,
Phil's college career was interrupted
when he entered the Army, but aft-
er two months he was back on cam-
pus with a medical discharge and was
ready to resume his studies as an
architectural engineer and his sports
activities.
For the past three years, Michi-
gan's linksmen have captured the
Big Ten Golf Title. Marcellus has
been one of the most influential
factors in the victories, probably
because he is a consistent and ac-
curate player and can usually be
counted on for long, powerful
drives, or for good green play when
sharp putting is needed. In the
1944 individual Conference play-
offs, Phil was runner-up to team-
mate John Jenswold, who captured
the title when he nosed out Mar-
cellus by two strokes.
Phil captained the 1944 squad and
feels that if the weather holds out
and the boys get sufficient practice,
the team should be able to win their
fourth straight Conference crown

COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

CAMBRIDGE TEXT TEMPLE NOTES .

. . $3.95

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