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February 06, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7"ZR i ; isi4

St k. M1CHiGAN I)AILY

......... . .....

Questionnaires
TO Aid U' Plan
Term Schedule
Civilian students must fill out a
questionnaire being distributed this
week by the War Board which will
enable the University to plan for the
summer term.
Each civilian student in the liter-
ary, pharmacy, architecture, business
administration, public health, edu-
cation, forestry, and engineering
schools is required to hand in a ques-
tionnaire. This does not include sen-
iors graduating in February.
Questionnaires will be given out
with the registration material ob-
tained in University Hall. Students
who have already called for their re-
gistration material and did not re-
ceive a blank are asked to return and
get one.
These are to be filled out and turn-
ed in to the student's counselor, clas-.
sifier, or advisor at the time new
elections are approved.
The information acquired will be
tabulated by University tabulating
machines and figures will be given
to the deans and department chair-
men.

Post-War Radio
Plans Are Told
By Prf. Abbot
At the recent meeting of Frequency
Modulation Broadcasters, Inc. in
New York City, attended by repre-
tatives from 14 eities in Michigan,
plans for an educational network for
the east coast states and Tennessee,
Kentucky, Michigan and Wisconsin
were discussed, according to Prof.
Waldo Abbot of the speech and radio
departments, who represented the
University.
Commissioner Fly of the Federal
Communications Commission an-
nounced that five million FM receiv-
ers would be ready by the end of the
first year of post-war production;
the following year, 20 million addi-
tional receivers will be manufactured
and sold. Practically all radio receiv-
ing sets built after the war will in-
clude FM.
The meeting was attended by ap-
proximately 800 people, most of
whom were either operators of FM
radio stations or persons contem-
plating such activities. Other speak-
ers were representatives of the United
States Office of Education, manu-
facturers of radio equipment, radio
engineers and persons interested in
the commercial side of broadcasting.

Navy

Announces Seizure of Kwajalein

COEDS TURN STAGEHANDS:

Ebadon 8Nggerann North Passi, amu
Ebadon 9 dgigen
lOabik agan
Melatto oggerik
Tabik
Channel .nm
Eumet
Boggenaten .. .jt Onemak
Ewadac
Ambo/
Channel j
t JChanne
Nini g1
South Pass
KWAJALEIN EnubuK
0 25
STATUTE MILES

Shakespeare PlayUses GreekMotif

:,,Eb eye
Kwajalein

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Arrows at the left indicate Kwajalein Island, now under the control
of the Army's Seventh Division; and Roi Island, where U.S. Marines
have secured the northern section of the atoll. Other arrows indicate
Jap bases which have been under bombardment by the Navy.

University Hospital Conducts
Exprients with Penicillin

1

Paint-daubed, hamimer v.ielding
coeds, working under the direction of
Herbert Philippi, have completed the
stage sets for Shakespeare's "The
Comedy of Errors" which will be
given by Play Production of the
speech department at 8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday through Saturday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Greek Pattern Used
Not only will the costumes for the
comedy be Greek in nature, but the
entire stage setting will follow a
stylized Greek pattern. In comment-
ing on the Greek motif in contrast
with the Elizabelhan which is tradi-
tionally used, Philippi said, "There is
great opportunity in working with
the Greek motif, for the Elizabethan
has been pretty well exploited by
now, and this comedy lends itself
readily to Greek settings."
The entire scheme was organized
with the idea in mind of maneuver-
ability and fast shifts as the entire
stage crew consists of coeds and the
play itself runs continuously without
an intermission, as Shakespeare
wrote it to be played. Borrowing an-
other idea from the Greeks, three
turntables are used for operating a
false proscenium so that the sets may
be easily and rapidly changed.
Painting Decorates Sets
The sets to be used exhibit a great
deal of intricate painting, most of
which was done by the stage crew
members with a final touching up by
Mr. Philippi. A general color scheme
of gold, grey, pink and blue grey was
employed and this too is reminiscent
of the Greeks, for they often painted
their architecture.
In discussing the procedure fol-
lowed in developing the stage sets,
Mr. Philippi said that after reading
the play the next step is to decide on
the general theme and then delve
into research before the actual work
on the sets begins. He commended
the girls on the stage crew and said,
"We have found that the girls who
have been given responsible positions
this year have been very efficient."
Mr. Philippi came to Michigan last
summer from McMurray College and
before that he was at Cornell.
Stage manager for "The Comedy
of Errors" is Jean Christian and on
the electrical crew are Marie Arons-
son, Martha Elliott and Doris Lesser.
Working on the stage crew are Th-el-
ma Davis, Jacqueline Kramer, Doro-

thy Langel and Barbara Lurie; prop- formiance of the comedy at 2:30 p.m.
erties are being handled by Margaret Saturday. Tickets may be purchased
Hamilton. starting tomorrow in the Lydia Men-
There will also be a matinee per- delssohn box office.

Two Reminders:
1. Look over our new Copies of
best sellers, both CURRENT
and FICTION.
2. BUY WAR BONDS
WAHRS

/

FOR 'UNFORGETTABLE*
BEAUTY
Miss DENNEY's Lipstick
shades add unforgettable' *
Beauty to your make-up .,.
touch your lips with vivid, ~f
luscious color . . the creamy
texturemakes your lips
smooth and lovely-
At our Cosmetic
Counter,
$100
$150 {]EN(
,iicax

Penicillin, initiated into the Uni-
versity Hospital less than a year ago,
is now being used experimentally in
the departments of medicine and
surgery, Mr. Harvey Miller, chief
pharmacist of the institution, said
yesterday.
Derived from a common mold, pen-
icillin notatum, penicillin's existence
was first discovered by Professor
Alexander Fleming at St. Mary's Hos-
pital, London, in 1929. However, its
discovery did not cause much interest
and consequently its many possibili-
ties were not appreciated, Mr. Miller
said.
With the publication of certain
papers in England announcing the
results of Fleming's findings, inter-
est in the clinical possibilities of
penicillin was greatly stimulated, a
pamphlet on penicillin, published
by Merck and Company, stated. In
the fall of 1941, arrangements were
made for the production of pen-
icillin in the United States. Ameri-
ca's entry into the war shortly aft-
er, introduced the element of urg-
ency to the already aroused scien-
tific interest in the therapeutic pos-
sioilities of penicillin.
Fronm study of its, clinical reports,
it is apparent that the discovery of
penicillin is a forward step in chemo-
therapy. Penicillin has now reached
the stage at which its efficacy in a
wide variety of diseases has been
established, although its full clinical
potentialities are yet to be realized,
the pamphlet said.

The final form of this drug is a
fine yellowish powder. It is very sol-
uble in water, and is stable to light.
Penicillin has proved to be remark-
ably effective in the treatment of in-
fections produced by the staphylo-
coccus aureus, pneumococcus, hemo-
lytic streptococcus, and the gonococ-
cus. Under the guidance of the Com-
mittee on Chemotherapeutic, 500
cases of various infections were treat-
ed with penicillin by 22 groups of in-
vestigators.
The, pamphlet stated that peni-
cillin has proved to be highly ef-
fective in the treatment of pneu-
mococcic pneumonia. The results
obtained in the treatment of gonor-
rhea with penicillin are also spec-
tacular.
Most of the supply of penicillin to-
day is devoted to military uses, only
about 15 per cent being provided for
civilian uses. It is distributed to civ-
ilian hospitals under the jurisdiction
of Dr. Chester W. Keefer of Evans
Memorial Hospital in Boston.
"However, in a few months, a great-
er supply of penicillin will be avail-
able both for military and civilian
purposes," Mr. Miller said.

.. ,

THIS WEEK
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
Play Production m
'The Conedql'0f.C
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
WITH HARP ENSEMBLE
A great play offering grand entertainment
Five Performances Only
Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. Nights at 8:30
Sat. Matinee at 2:30
Tickets - 88c . 66c - 44c (tax included)
Box office phone 6300
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre (In Michigan League Bldg.)

BUY WAR BONDS!

T ! "

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Fashion Fresh accessories are mag
ulants to every Suit! Ours are ac
top honors. Excitingly new and di

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pie stim-
credited
fferent
GLOVES for extra spice! Flash-
ing white, gay purple, red, gold,
pastels and dark colors. Fabrics
from $1.25. Kid and capeskin
$2.50. Pigskin from $4,00.

a

I

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Rosenblur

n Suit
Covert

of Venetian
Pure Wool,
Hand-picked

Edges.

Tailored in California

SMART BAGS aren't hard to
find here! With shoulder straps,
drawstrings, in leathers and
fabrics from $4=00. Budget
Bags from $3.00, Billfolds and
cozy kits, too.

SUITS COME FIRST!
They're the signal corps
of Spring. And for 1944,
they're as variedin type
as a woman's whims. At
left is a twill classic at
$29.95. Companion coat
also $29.95. Sizes 10-20.

Tangy
toast,

deser t s
luggage,

hades.

gold,

R A F.

blue, red and kelly.
Misses' Sizes
29P T5
SPORT SOP

.+ 2-
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37):

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SUITABLE BLOUSES are as di-
versified in type as the suits they
are designed to accornpany.
There's news in our ruffled

;
'

charmers. Lingerie touches in
young, drawstring and tailored
styles. Wonderful with your suits.
Atop skirts, they'll double your
wardrobe.

DICKIES. A touch of white
in beau- catching frills,
bow fronts, new weskits,
and crisply tailored styles.
Really new Fashion Life
for your wardrobe!

z. a s
i ".-.

1x ' 7. I t I

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