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November 04, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ID X, NOT, 4, 1941

V IIMT~I DANf~ILY

olverines Lead Western Conference in Offensive

'ower

Court Squad
Holds Initial
Practice Drill
The basketball team got off to a
flying start yesterday as it had its
first intensive practice of the new
year. Assistant Coach Bill Barclay
ran the team through its paces, which
featured a fast, breaking offense,
along with the style used in its games
last year. The squad was also given
some set block plays in an effort to
function out a smooth working team
and to give the players an idea of
what type of play is employed by the
Wolverine quintet.
Mr. Fisher, who is in charge of
somie of the PEM sections, will pick
out some of the Navy men who have
their choice of sport and who excel
in basketball, and will send them to
Coach Oosterbaan for a tryout. There
is also a special practice for freshmen
at. 5:15 in an endeavor to weed out
any talent available there.
'Me opening game of the current
season will be played the first week
in December although a starting
opponent has not yet been signed.
Some possible non-conference games
with Western State, Grosse Ile, Ro-
mulus Air Base and Great Lakes,
are now being planned, if these var-
tous, teams cah get together on their
dates. There have been no confer-
ence games scheduled to date.
The present standouts include
Dave Strack, and Charlie Ketterer
from Michigan and in the Marines;
Sobrider from Ohio State; Thomp-
son from Kalamazoo; King, Paton
And atevens from Michigan State;
Sill Oren, John Ledde from Stan-
ford, and Herman Hennesee, Ensign
from Carnegie Tech.
BAR(
ST U

Indiana Rates Highest Defensively;
Wiese, Hirsch Share Punting Honors

V\

By pounding ouU enough yardage
to score 42 points on Illinois, on top
of the necessary ground for the 49
points made on Minnesota, the
Michigan Wolverines have charged1
to the top of the Western Confer-
ence in offensive power. In sup-
planting Purdue, which held the
Leading Passer

* *

At the same time, Indiana held
tightly to the defensive laurels inj
the Conference, and still maintained
third place on attack. The Hoosiers
have allowed opponents only 130
yards per game which is seven less
than Purdue has conceded to be the
second best defensive team. North-
western, which holds second place
in the Conference race, behind Pur-
due and Michigan; is fourth in!
offense and fifth in defense. A mir-
acle on defense is the Iowa team
that has lost two and tied one andi
still rates fourth place. Minnesota
is eighth on defense and completely
last on offense.
Indicative of the offensive powers
of Michigan and Purdue is the fact
that they have averaged only four
punts per game and the Boilermak-
ers have rolled up 17 first downs a
game. Michigan is the best kicking
team with a mark of 42.3 yards
while Purdue is the poorest with only
20.3.
Indiana with the brilliant Bob
Hoernschemeyer throwing, is the
best passing team in the Conference
and has completed an average of
eight out of 17 per game. North-
western with five out of 12 is second
but generally speaking this has been
more of a running than passing year
in the Conference. Purdue has been
penalized 79 yards per game while
at the other extreme the young
Badgers have been taxed only 21
yards for infractions of the rule.

Although little noticea among such
oustanding feats as Bill Daley's line-
smashing and Elroy Hirsch's broken-
field running, Michigan's punting via
the toes of Hirsch and Bob Wiese has
proved to be the best to date in the
Big Ten.
With Wiese booting them from
regular punt formation and Crazy-

Skilled Rooter

Lowrey Has
Few Veteran
Puckmen Left
With the Coliseum opening Satur-
day, Nov. 13, and hockey practice
beginning at the start of the next
week, it is apparent that coach Eddie
Lowrey is on the look-out for mater-
ial for his . ice squad. .
Captain Bob Derleth, sixty-minute
defenseman from last year's team,
is one of the few men to return, to
campus this year. Derleth, who is
at present filling in the gap left by
Merv Pregulman at center on the
Michigan grid team, will be the main
bulwark of the defensive team that
Lowrey will have to build.
In last year's games Derleth was1
a tireless performer. An excellent
skater, he had not had any experi-
ence playing collegiate hockey be-
fore he started practicing with the
puckmen last year. Despite the fact.
that he lacked any practical experi-
ence he learned very rapidly, and
played a stellar role throughout the
main portion of the season.
Most of Squad Gone
Lowrey lost almost his entire squad
through graduation or the draft,
including such stalwarts as goalie
Hank Loud, who had been a consis-
tent performer in the nets for three
years.
The loss of Loud is a very serious
one to the squad. His numerous,
well-timed saves kept Michigan from
disaster many times throughout the
three seasons he played, and at times
the "human sieve" as he was jok-
ingly referred to, was so besieged by
shots from all angles, that it was
impossible for the spectators to de-
termine where the puck was at any
givenmoment-nevertheless Hank
knew.
If someone appears on the hockey
scene who can take over the nets,
one aspect of Lowrey's rather serious
problem will be overcome.
Stenberg Not Here
Bob Stenberg, stocky little de-
fenseman, who played sixty-minute
hockey along with his tall partner
Derleth, has left the University, and
again it will be a difficult job to
replace him. Stenberg played such
scrappy hockey, despite wobbly an-
kles and small stature, that he per-
petually brought the crowd to its
feet. .
Bill Dance and Roy Bradley, wings,
are no longer here, but in this de-
partment Lowrey has the nucleus of
a squad at least. Returning are vet-
erans Gordie Anderson and Jack
Athens, wings also, who saw action
last year, and will probably be im-
portant aids to the hockey machine
this year.

SOUTH BEND, Ind., Nov. 3.-(IP)-
For once midwest folks aren't laugh-r
ing too much over Frank Leahy's
latest wails about his Notre Damet
football team. It really looks tough1
this time for Leahy and his Irish-
they'll probably be lucky to score 30
points against Army next Saturday.1
Why Angelo Bertelli is gone-andc
he's been good for two, three touch-
down passes a game as the Irish
scored 41 points on Pitt, 55 on Geor-
gia Tech, 35 on Michigan, 50 on
Wisconsin, 47 on Illinois, 33 on Navy.
Just like cutting the heart out of a
man's body-Leahy said so himself
this week.
And here's poor Julius Rykovich,
just barely manages to get around
after that bout with illness over the
week-end. Possibly got a case of
sniffles from the breezes as he and
his teammates rushed, around the
Cleveland Stadium against Navy last
week.
No Good Against Tough Teams
And it's apparent from the records
that Notre Dame hasn't been worth
a whoop against the big teams. Sure',
Pitt and Georgia Tech and Wiscon-
sin and Illinois were easy-despite
Leahy's copious tears before each of
those games. But by how much did
the Irish beat a big, strong team
like Michigan? Only 35 to 12-lucky
they didn't get their brains beaten
out. And Navy? There was a tough
one-gave in only 33 to 6, hardly the
way to act against the nation's No.
I football team.
Now everyone grieves noisily over
Leahy's tough November schedule.'
Has to play Army, Northwestern, the
Iowa Seahawks with their simplified
array of 14 plays, and Great Lakes.
Why if they throw some kind of a
big charity bout in the Rose Bowl
New Year's Day and Notre Dame
gets an invitation ana permission to
Former Varsity Merman
Now Stars in Medical Unit
Removing the lung of a wounded
German in the dim light of a front-
line tent, Maj. Paul "Buck" Samson
is becoming just as famous in this
war as he was when he was a star
swimmer for Michigan in 1925, '26,
and '27, according to a dispatch re-
ceived from Algiers by Matt Mann,
the Wolverine swimming coach.
Maj. Samson is now attached to
the medical unit of the U.S. Fifth
Army in Italy, and performed the
delicate operation within a few miles
of the fighting front.

Leahy Wails As Bertelli
Leaves Irish Grid Squad

meet Southern California, that pro-
longs Leahy's agony through the
month of December. Scarcely gives
him time to think about Christmas.
Bertelli Leaves Gap
Yes, sir, Bertelli is gone. The heart
has been removed. There is that big
Irish body just kicking around with-
out control all the month of Novem-
ber-guys like Limont and Yonakor.
White and Czarobski, Fillex and Per-
ko, Coleman, Miller, Rykovich and
Mello flailing around aimlessly with
Johnny Lujack-at Bertelli's suc-
cessor-striving valiantly to avoid
chaos.
Well, everyone figures those kids
will get a kick out of competing in
football before going off to war,
even if they don't win another game.
Leahy said that himself, back last
September. They'll have a good time
on the train to New York, even if
they have to pull their feet up on the
Pullman seams to keep dry when Lea-
hy's tears start pouring down the
aisle.
Trosky Bacck
O.Active List
CLEVELAND, Nov. 3.-(P)- The
Cleveland Indians put fence-busting
Hal Trosky in their showcase today
as one of the winter baseball mar-
ket's choicest selections of wartime
trading bait.
The big first baseman, who volun-
tarily retired because of chronic mi-
graine headaches and an accumula-
tion of grievances after a disappoint-
ing 1941 season, was restored to the
active list at his own request as a
prelude to trade talk with other
clubs.
Vice-President Roger Peckinpaugh
declared nothing was imminent and
farmer Trosky, busy picking corn
for a neighbor at Norway, Iowa, said
he had not been approached yet.
Hal, who came to the tribe a decade
ago as an outfielder, will be 31 on
Armistice Day.
Trosky unexpectedly appeared at
Chicago last summer, worked out
there with the Browns and indicated
to Peckinpaugh he would, like to play
at Chicago or St. Louis so he could
return to the farm on off days. "I
hold no hope at all that he ever will
rejoin the Indians," Peckinpaugh
said today, "but with Trosky back
on the active list, I'm in a position
now to see what I can get for him."

JACK WINK
offensive margin for a couple of
weeks, Michigan has averaged 356
yards per game in three starts to the
Boilermakers' 350 in four champion-
ship contests.

BOB WIESE

;AINS IN USED. TEXT

oa

S

legs quick-kicking past surprised op-
ponents, the Wolverines have aver-
aged 42.3 yards per punt in Western
Conference competition, 4.5 yards
better than second place Wisconsin.
The Michigan line has kept the op-
position down to five yards per punt
return, while Coach Fritz Crisler's.
charges have averaged 13 yards per
return, bringing the ball back 324
yards on 25 kicks.
The Maizq and Blue will have to
do a lot of scoring to offset the pass-
ing of Bobby Hoernschemeyer next
Saturday when Hunchy and his
Hoosiers come to town. The Wolver-
ine's third string right halfback,
George Welch, became Hoernsche-
meyer as the whiteshirts ran through
Indiana's plays for the second
straight day yesterday, and Welch
completed pass after pass against the
varsity's first and second stringers.

or NEW I You Prefer
J DENT SUPPLIES for all Departments

............

a

Individual, Big

CONFERENCE STANDINGS

Purdue .....
Michigan .....
Northwestern.
Indiana ......

W L
40
3 0
3 1
2 1

T
0
0
0
1

S
Pet.
1.000
1.000
.750
.667

Ten Statistics
Daley, Mich. .......
Hirsch, Mich. ......
Buffmire, N.U. .....
H'rnschemeyer, Ind.
Pihos, Ind. ........
Dimancheff, Pur. ...
Dubicki, Pur. ..... .
McGovern, Ill.....

3
3
4
4
4
4
4
3

6
4
3
3
3
3
1
2

3
0
0
0
0
0
9
3

39
24
18
18
18
18
15
15

Illinois ...........1 2 0 .333
Wisconsin.........1 3 0 .250
Iowa ............. 0 2 1 .000
p M CHGA BO KS OR Ohio State...... 0 3 0 .000
MIC HIGA N BOOKSTOR E-*s ae
Minnesota........ 0 2 0 .000
322 S. State at N. University Bob Graham, Mgr. SCORING
ii1G TD PAT Tot.
Butkovich, Pur...... 4 13 0 78

P
h
I
t"

RUSHING

Dimancheff, P.
Daley, Mich...
Butkovich, Pur.
Bray. Ill..... .
Hirsch, Mich..
McGovern, Ill.

G
4
3
4
3
3
3

TC
50
70
95
41
44
35

Net Av.
Gain Gm.
321 80.5
502 167.3
626 156.5
307 102.3
204 68.0
186 62.0

Av.
Try
6.4
7.1
6.5
7.5
4.7
5.3

sr4

, "
'
."

Szath-Myri and his,
30-piece orchestra
Brilliant arranger whose ar-
rangements have been played
by the nation's famous or-
chestras, brings his 30-piece
orchestra and his great talent
to the new Goebel Hour.

}" r
t'., " "
: '1
s
,.".. i
}'s:;
l ?. '
C
fi ,

Emile Cote with his
famous 16-voice chorus
Famed choir leader and na-
tional figure in choral work,
Cote's fine choir combination
of 16 voices, singing his own
special arrangements, adds
charm and scope to the music
)f the Goebel show.

Bob Hannon, featured
network soloist
A national radio network
favorite, young Bob Hannon
will rise to new heights of
popularity as he contributes
one of today's finest tenor
voices to the new Goebel
program.

* ..j
I
a
s

H'nschm'r, Ind.
Graham, N.U..
Wink,Mi. . .
Vacanti, Pur..
Davis, OSU ..

G
4
4
3
4
3.

Att.
67
39
6
45
12

cp.
31
18
3
15
6

Net Av.
Gain Gm.
433 108.2
400 100.0
87 43.5
165 40.2
116 38.2

PASSING

t

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NOW signalmen can
wear helmets with this
new headset'I
SIGNALMEN formerly saw action without helmets because
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telephone work.
Fitting snugly under the helmets they give better recep.
tion by keeping out battle noise .. . they are cooler, more
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Direct From RCA-Victor Studios in New York Over Blue Network
a "

Station WXYZ and Michigan Radio Network

0

" '

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