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December 07, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Michigan's Civilian

agers

Defeat Romulus

Fliers,

42-30

- - - - - - - - -R
- - _ _ . . .._

w

TAKING IT EASY
By ED ZALENSKI
Daily Sports Editor
Once a Fighter-Always ...
AMON RUNYAN, Granland Rice, Ring Lardner and John Kiernan did
it, so why can't we. Yes, we mean write fiction. Whether or not any
of them ever wrote a story in place of a column we don't know. But we
are willing to try anything once.
THE COLD blast of wind, sending little whirlpools of snow skipping along
the sidewalk, brought an involuntary shiver from the young man hug-
ging a darkened doorway across the street from "Joe's All-Night Lunch
Wagon."
His face, reflected in the pale yellow light of the street lamp and the
flickering white lights of the Hippodrome marquee, was battered and
scarred. To the denizens of "Cauliflower Alley" or the "Followers of Fis-
tian" where pugs, stumblebums and tankers rubbed elbows with the elite of
the prize ring, that twisted face told a 'story more moving than mere words
of description. It was the face of a "has-been" of the fight game-a slap-
happy pug who walked on his heels and who had bells in his ears.
Despite the gloom of Fulton Street's dim lights a passer-by could
see that the ex-fighter was unshaven, haggard and thin. His sunken
cheeks and eyes set in the center of darkened circles, twitched nervously
as he gazed searchingly through the lighted window of Joe's place.
The fragrance of juicy steaks and fresh-cooked coffee came to his
hungry nostrils on the crest of each succeeding wintry blast.
OCCASIONALLY, he would raise his battered face to look at "Tommie
Fortuno vs. Young Dilly for the world's welterweight championship" on
the Hippodrome marquee. And the look on that face was that of a man
who would give his rig. t arm to get inside the doors and see that bout. He
fingered the scars on his face as he thought about Fortuno's rapier-like
right. The doorman wouldn't let him in. What difference did it make that
he was Babe Trisko, former welterweight title contender. To the doorman
he was just another stumblebum. Dissipation had sapped his youth and his
money and with it went his friends.
The cramping sensation in his stomach suddenly brought him
back to reality. He drew in a deep breath and the odor of steak and
. coffee coming from Joe's drove all thoughts of boxing and Fortuno
from his spinning head. He was weak from hunger and desperate.
THE NEXT chilling gust of wind and snow brought with it a well-dressed
middle-aged man with a black 'homberg and a cigar clenched in his
teeth: Nick Jefferson was in no hurry. His card was sure to draw a full
house crowd of 20,000. The fans liked Fortuno and hated Dilly. The bout
vas a natural and would fill the empty Hippodrome coffers. He was happy
and contented with the world. That's why he almost bumped into Trisko.
"Pardon me," he said, "I was day dreaming." He was about to pass
on when something familiar in the battered face caught his eye. He
.stopped short. "Can I do something for you, Babe?" he asked. The ex-
fighter, remembering more proserous days when he used to sla Jef-
ferson on the back and call him Nick, dropped his eyes.
"I'm broke, Mr. Jefferson. I ain't had a thing to eat since yesterday.
It's' kinda cold to be hungry. I see Fortuno is gonna fight Dilly for the
title. I wish it was me instead. Boy, I wish I could see it. I sure could down
one of Joe's steaks, a slab of pie and some coffee."
Jefferson peeled of a couple dollar bills and slipped them into
Trisko's hand. "Go over and buy yourself a dinner. Two bucks should
fill out the creases in your belly."
A FTER glancing up at the marquee again Trisko slowly crossed the
street and walked up to the door of, Joe's place. The pleasant odor
of frying steak and onions made his head swim. He quickened his step.
Just before entering he glanced back. "I sure would like to see Dilly
beat 'im. I shouldda asked Jefferson for a ticket, but I didn't have the
nerve." The low muimble of his voice brought him to. He reached for
the knob, started turning it, and hesitated. The flickering lights of the
marquee across the street fascinated him.
"That steak is going to taste damn good," he thought as he turned the
knob and walked in. Joe didn't even bother looking up from his newspaper.
Trisko walked slowly along the counter, hesitated at the last stool, turned
around and slowly walked out. He walked across the street.
"Slapping two dollars into the cashier's cage, he said, "Gimme a
ticket." He grabbed the pasteboard and hurried by the doorman. There
was a peculiar smile on his twisted face as he pulled up his belt to the
last notch.

Killed in Italy

Lund, Wikel, Seymour
Lead Michigan Attack

Appeal Rejected

Capt. John Sprague, former star
blocking back and captain of the
Southern Methodist University
football team, has been killed in
action on the Italian front. He
gave his life protecting another
soldier from machine-gun fire.
Courtright' s
Mat Squad Has
Short Schedule
The Michigan fans will now have
to wait until Jan. 8 to get a gander
at Coach Courtright's 1944 edition of
his fine mat squad.
The Big Ten schedule meeting was
held in Chicago last Saturday and
much to his disappointment, Corky
could not schedule any morematches
as the other schools were all filled
up or their schedules would conflict.
Only four wrestling matches have
been scheduled so far and two of
these are only tentative. This is one
of the shortest wrestling seasons that
Michigan has had. Tlis is partly due
to the fact that the conference meet
has been moved up two weeks earlier
than the usual time and will be held
Feb. 19 at Northwestern in Evanston,
Ill.
However, Corky is trying to get two
more matches for Jan. 15 and 19 to
lengthen out his present schedule.
This delay in the first match might
do the Wolverine wrestlers some
good, in that they will be in tip-top
shape and raring to go by the time
that any opponents are met.
There will be an intersquad match
staged this coming Saturday in the
wrestling quarters at Ferry Field and
this should give Courtright an idea
of whom to favor in some of the close
cases that have arisen at the various
weight divisions.
The present wrestling schedule is:
Ohio State at Columbus, Jan. 8; Pur-
due here, Jan. 22 (this is one of the
tentative opponents); Indiana at
Bloomington, Feb. 12; Northwestern
here, Feb. 5, and this one is also ten-
tative. To top off this schedule is the
conference meet Feb. 19.

By DAVE LOWENBERG
A University of Michigan basket-
ball team, using only civilian players,
was strong enough to whip a medi-
ocre Romulus Army Air team 42-30
at their home base last night.
The Maize and Blue were slow in
getting started because the floor was
smaller than they were used to play-
ing on and in addition the boys had
a little troubledacclamating them-
selves to the zone defense which the
fliers employed. The half ended with
Romulus on top 16-13.
After eight or nine minutes of the
last half, Michigan finally surged
ahead 19-18, and from then on never
relinquished the lead.
Lund High-Point Man
Don Lund, husky Maize and Blue
guard, was high-point man for the
Wolverines, getting five baskets and
a free throw for a grand total of 11
points. Lund scored all of his baskets
with a beautifully executed one-
handed shot from around the free
throw circle.
Howie Wikel and Bob Seymour,
Michigan forwards, tied for second
place scoring honors with 10 points
apiece. Wikel's fast-breaking play
was the spark which set off Mich-
igan's attack in the last period.
Howie put some life into the team
and they started to roll. Wikel scored
all of his field goals on fast-breaking
plays under the basket.
Seymour Also Hit
Bill Seymour gave another exhibi-
tion of his fine offensive talents by
scoring every one of his field goals on
tip in shots. In all practice sessions so
far this season Bill has excelled in
this department.
John Leddy was the outstanding

smooth ball handling proved advan-
tageous to the Michigan attack.
It was officially announced last
night that the basketball game be-
tween Great Lakes and Michigan
scheduled for Friday night has been
postponed because of Great Lakes'
heavy schedule.
Unless dates are available later,
no games with Great Lakes will be
played. With the heavy schedule of
both teams, it is unlikely that any
satisfactory arrangements can be
worked out.
Fort Custer Saturday Night
However, Michigan fans will get
another chance to see their team in
action as arrangements have just
been completed to play a game with
Fort Custer here Saturday night. A
return game at Fort Custer will be
played Jan. 18.
THE BOX SCORE

Derleth's Loss
Great Blow
To Pcksers
The loss of Captain Bob Derleth,
star of last year's hockey team, may
turn out to be more serious thai was
realized.
Derleth was an important cog in
the squad and his absence from the
team may cause a breakdown since
Coach Eddie Lowrey will have to
change the combination he has been
working with for the last three weeks.
Derleth was a star defenseman of
last year and his presence is needed
not only on the backline, but also for
the morale of the squad.
Derleth was injured Friday when
he crashed into the boards during a
practice session. He suffered a torn
cartilage and bruised joint in his
knee. It will be necessary for him to
have his knee in a cast for a month,
which will keep him off the ice until
after Christmas.
The gap in the defense will be
filled by Bob Henderson, who has
been playing wing. Henderson had
been named for the second team. As
yet Lowrey has not been able to de-
cide who will play in Henderson's
position.
This switch of men upsets the
whole system that Lowrey has been
working in preparation for the first
game Saturday with London Athletic
Club. This unfortunate transfer of
men from one spot to another is
untimely.
This game will give Lowrey his

William D. Cox, until recently
president of the Philadelphia Phil-
lies, was denied his appeal for rein-
statement by Commissioner Kene-
saw M. Landis. Cox a short time
ago was barred from baseball for
betting on ball games.

MICHIGAN G F
Hilkene, f. .......... 2 0
Seymour, f.........4 2
Wikel, f. ............ 3 4
Oren, c............. 1 3
Lund, g. .............5 1
Leddy, g. .......... 1 0
Totals ...........16 8

PF TP
3 4
2 10
1 10
1 5
3 11
2 2
12 40

Michigan Sport
Schedule

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

ROMULUS BASE
Gilbert, f. ..........
Rossito, f. ..........
Gilman, f. ..........
Burnett, c. ....,.... .
Stralecki, g. ........
Lutz, g. ............
Lewis, g . ...........
Pioch, g...........

G
1
0
4
3
2
1
3
0

F
2
0
0
2
3
0
3
19

PF
1
0
2
2
2
3
2
0.
12

TP
4
0
0
8
71
2i
9
0
30

Michigan man on defense and his Totals...........10

Wheeler, Giant Navy Wrestler

Date
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Date
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.

4
6
1
1
I
"1
8
i
1
1
5
I
1

4
6
11
18
1
7
8
14
15
18
21
22
28
29
4
5
12
19

Opponent
Central Michigan
Romulus Air Base
Fort Custer
Western Michigan
West. Michigan ]
Northwestern
Illinois
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Fort Custer ]
Purdue
Purdue
Ohio State
Ohio State
Indiana
Indiana
Chicago
Northwestern

Place
Here
Romulus
Here
Here
Kalamazoo
Here
Here
Madison
Madison
Ft. Custer
Lafayette
Lafayette
Here
Here
Here
Here
Chicago
Evanston
ULE
Place
Here
Evanston
Here
Here
Here
Evanston

Entering Fifth S
By HANK MANTHO
This year has been a peculiar one
for intercollegiate athletics, and the
case of Lou Wheeler, 6 ft. 4 in., 220-
pounder from the Pacific fleet, is no
exception to this rule.
Lou is a candidate for the heavy-
weight division of this year's wrest-
ling squad. He is big of stature and
gives one the impression that he
would not dare to meet such a man
in a dark alley. Maybe that is one
of the reasons Coach Courtright has
Wheeler out for his wrestling team.
His buddies call him "Shipwreck"
and if you would ever see him, you
could very easily understand this
nick-name tacked on to him.
From New York
Lou is a product of Hempstead
High school, Long Island, N.Y. While
in high school, Wheeler did no wrest-
ling as it was just introduced to the
Pro Football Season
To End Successfully
CHICAGO, Dec. 6.-(A')-The Na-
tional Football League will close one
of its most successful seasons Sun-
day with attendance for the 40-game
schedule reaching the 1,072,469 mark
-an increase of 36.7 per cent over
last year for each game.
The turn-stile figure, announced1
today by League officials, is based in
advance of the Redskins-New York
Giants game at Washington Sunday,
already is a sell-out with a crowd of
some 35,500 expected.

ervice Year

first chance
petition.

school his last year. He was no
active in any other sports while i:
high school, and his athletic caree
did not begin until he entered th
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute o
Engineers, Brooklyn, N.Y. Here, Lo
wrestled for one semester and mad
the Varsity in the heavyweight divi
sion, qualifying for a letter. Brookly
Polytechnic competed with suc
schools at Columbia, Penn State an
other schools in that vicinity.
Before joining the Navy, Wheele
wrestled for the Schenectad
Y.M.C.A. and took the heavyweigh
division in the Adirondack's AAT
championships for 1939. He ther
joined the.Navy and wrestled for th
Pensacola Naval Air Station. Fror
Pensacola, Lou went to Corpu
Christi, where he wrestled an
coached the team.
Transferred to Pacific Coast
Shortly after t14is, Wheeler wa
again transferred, this time to th
Pacific Coast, where he was runner
up for the heavyweight divison i
the eleventh Naval district, whic
included the Army, Navy an
Marines.
That was the end of his wrestlin
career until he received orders t
come to Michigan. Wheeler was i
Brisbane, Australia, when he was or
dered to report to the V-12 unit her
Lou just celebrated his fourth yea
in the Navy last week. He likes Mich
igan very much and is now enrolle
in one of the University's engineerin
courses in an endeavor to become ar
aerological officer. He maintainedE
fine average while in school here las
semester.

to see the team in com-

It
A
n
'r
e
If
U
e
-
n
h
d
r
y
t
n
e
s
d
Ls
le -
n
h
a

SWIMMING SCHED
Opponent
8 Michigan AAU
15 Northwestern y
22 Ohio State
29 Purdue
12 Northwestern
19 West. Conference.

Little Suggests"
.Rule Changes
NEW YORK, Dec. 6.-(P)-Lou Lit-
tle, football mentor at Columbia and
Chairman of the Coaches' Rules
Committee, recommended today that
forward passing be allowed anywhere
behind the line of scrimmage by col-
legians and that the tee be returned
as a rest for the ball at the kickoff.
Using a pad and pencil during the
interview while his ailing vocal cords
got another day of rest, Little said he
made the two suggestions in the be-
lief that they would increase the of-
fense.
Unrestricted forward passing be-
hind the line of scrimmage already is
a part of the professional football
code and is one of the reasons the T-
formation clicks so successfully for
the Chicago Bears and the Philadel-
phia-Pittsburgh 'Steagles. College
passers must be five yards behind the
line of scrimmage.
Little penciled that this suggested
rule change not only would benefit
all the college T-formations--"and
there are likely to be more'of them
next year than there were this"-but
that it also would increase the effect-
iveness of the double and single wing
attacks.

Date
Feb. 12
Feb. 19
Mar. 4
Mar. 4
Mar. 18
Mar. 25

TRACK SCHEDULE
Opponent Place
Western Michigan Here
Notre Dame Here
Illinois-Notre Dame
Champaign
Conference Chicago'
Purdue Relays Lafayette
Chicago Chicago

Lt. Bob Savage Wounded
PHILADELHPHIA, Dec. 6.-(P)-
Lt. Bob Savage, former Philadelphia
Athletics pitcher, was wounded in ac-
tion in Italy Nov. 5 and has been
awarded the Order of the Purple
'heart, Connie Mack said today.

BOB HUME, TRACK CAPTAIN:
Big Things Expected of Al' Star

By BILL MATNEY, JR.
For the past two years, there have
been two fellows whose*similarity in
looks has kept the coaches, sports
scribes and members of opposing
teams constantly in a daze. Those
boys are the.Hume twins, Ross and
Bob, two of the outstanding perform-
ers on the Michigan Varsity track
squad. Off the two, Ross has been
the more impressive as a runner in
the past, although Bob does not com-
pete in all events with Ross. But Bob
is thecomer, and indications are al-
ready beg' 'ing to take form which
substantiate 'hiis belief.
Bob Improves '.pidly
Last year, Ross won the conference
mile championship, while Bob took a
place among the top men in his
event, but not winning it. During the
outdoor season, Bob improved so rap-
idly that by the time the outdoor title
meet rolled around, he was literally
on the heels of his brother in Ross'
favorite. event, the mile run.
Members of the varsity squad
seemed to sense the increased worth

in Bob by selecting him as their cap-
tain for the 1943-44 track campaign,
and he has responded by taking on
the new responsibility with confi-
dence and facility. He has the quali-
ties which make for a leader, and his
personality is definitely suitable for
the task of inspiring what has the!
makings of another great Michigan'
track team to greater heights.
Won Honors in High School
Bob, along with Ross, attended
Canonsburg High in Pennsylvania,
where he did just about everything
except write the annual school play.
While competing on the track squad
there, he established a new record of
4:33 in the mile, and knocked off the
half-mile in 2:01. Incidentally, Bob
dashed through the 440 in 52 seconds
for good measure. Ross, at the same
time, was establishing a record in the
half, to make the Hume twins the
twin terrors of the city.
After graduating from high school,
the boys attended Shadyside Acad-
emy, a prep school in their home
state. Here, Bob added basketball to

his repertoire of accomplishments.
On the cinders, however, Bob slowed
down enough to hang up a 4:40.0
record in the mile. The brothers add-
ed to their successes as thinclads at
Sh'adyside, and then came to the
Midwest to prove that everything was
not luck or the Eastern competition.'
It wasn't luck or the Eastern com-
petition, as the coache's discovered,
much to their enjoyment. As fresh-
men, the Hume twins added their
names to the list of first-year record
holders by setting new marks in the
660 and 1000 yd. runs. Ross took
1:24.0 in which to complete the
shorter distance, while Bob ran his
five laps in 2:37.0.
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

TUESDAY, DEC. 7, 1943
VOL. LIV No. 30
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the '
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-

"full-time" and on annual or monthly
salary who ordinarily receive a vaca-
tion at the expense of the University
and pay on. holidays and for a rea-
sonable period of sick leave if neces-
sary, are not entitled to payment for
"overtime," whether in their own or

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