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March 12, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE- MICHIGAN DAILY
. _ I

_______________________________________ p ________________________________________ I

Church Groups
To Hold Weekly
Meetiigs Today.
DiseusSions, Talks,
Suppers, Open House
Planned for Evening
"My Philosophy of Life" will be
the topic of a new series of student
discussions starting 'at 5:45 p.m. to-
day at the Congregational-Disciples
Guild meeting with a cost supper
preceding at 5:15 p.mn.
Open house will be held at 3:30
p.m. this afternoon by the Lutheran
Student Association in the Zion Par-
ish Hall. New AriVmy, Navy and civil-
ian students are particularly invited
as well as old members. The regular
meeting will follow the dinner at 6
p.m. with Rev. Henry Yocler speaking
on "Commandments."
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, will hear Rev. R. W. Hahn,
Oak Park, Ill. addre'ss the group on
"Strength for Tomorrow" at 5 p.m.
in the Student Chapel. The Rev.
Hahn holds the position of national
director of student activities in the
Evangelical Lutheran Church in the
Missouri Synod.
Members of the activities commit-
tee of the United Ministry to Reset-
tIers will present a program on "Kag-
awa" at the Wesleyan Guild meeting
at 5 p.m. Kagawa, a contemporary
Japanese Christian, has been active
in the cooperative movement and'
his life and work will be told.
Herbert Twining will address the
Westminster Student Guild at 5 p.m.
today on "Building a Christrian Home
--Bringing Up the Children." Supper
and fellowship hour will follow.
Roger Williams Guild-will meet at
the Baptist Church at 5 p.m. tohear
Rev. C. H. Loucks lead a discussion
on Butrick's book ".Prayers"
After the choral evening prayer,
the Canterbury Club will have asup-
per at 6 p.mn. and then Rev. Henry
Lewis will speak on "Queer Things
in the History of Lent."
Rooms Are Available
At International Houxse
"There are vacancies in the re-
'cently opened International House,"
George Hall, assistant to the director
of the International Center, said
yesterday.
He added that foreign students
may now apply for rooms in the house
by seeing him at the Internationale
Center.

11u th IBerge To
Present Organ
Recital T odaye
Ruth Berge, Grad SM, will present
an organ recital in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for a Master of
Music degree at 8:30 p.m. today i n
Hill Auditorium.
Miss Berge, who has studied organ
with Dr. Palmer Christian, University
organist, for the past two years, is a
graduate of Concordia College, Moor-
'head, Minn., .and. a member of Mu
Phi Ep.lon, national honorary u-
sic society.
After beginning her organ study
with Miss Edith Garnaas of the Con-
cordia Conservatory, Miss Berge con-
tinued her work during summer per-
iods with Miss Marion Hutchinson
of the McPhail School of Music, Min-
neapolis. She has also.studiedr wth
Frank Van Dusen of the American
Conservatory, Chicago.
Today's program includes Bach's
"Prelude and Fugue in B minor" and
his choral' preludes "Christe, Du
Lamm Gottes" and "In Dulci Jubilo";
Franek's "Chorale in B minor"; De-
Lamarter's "Gothic Prelude"; Jep-
son's "Pantomime" and Sowerby's
"Arioso" and "Pageant."
Pian ProgramE
Sgt. Richard W. Flewell, Co. C, will
present a piano recital at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the Rackham Building
Assembly Hall.
A graduate of St. Olaf College,
Northfield, Minn., Sgt. Fle'well has a
Master of Music degree from the
University of Minnesota, where he
studied piano with Dimitri Metrop-
oulos, conductor of the Minneapolis
Symphony Orchestra,
He has also done work with Mrs.
mharles Hardy at the McPhail School
of Music, where he was assistant
teacher until he entered the Army.
The program includes Mozart's
"Fantasia in C minor"; Bach's "Toc-
cata in C minor"; Schubert's "Sona-
ta," Op. 143; Schumann's "Kinder-
scenen," Op. 15,; Chopin's "Noc-.
turne," Op. .37, No. 1, and, "Etudc ,"
Op. 10, No. 3; Brahms' "Rhapsodie,"
Op. 79, No. 2; Milhaud's "Corcovado,"
from "Sandades de Brazil"; Shosta-
kovich's "Etudes," Nos. 21,22; Poul-
enc's "Movement Perpetual" and De-
bussy's "Prelude," from Suite Pour
le Piano.

New Heads of Men's Judiciary Council

,i

J. JOSEPh LINKER ' .JOHN CLIPPERT
... President . . . Secretary

FOR 'M' MEN ONLY:
Wartime Union Is Open to All
New Stidents, Boucher Says

Clemencean To
Discuss France
In RU' Leetufe
"France, Today and Tomorrow"
will be considered by Pierre Clemen-
ceau, one of the leading figures in
the Free French movement, in
an Oratorical Association Lecture,
Thursday in Hill Auditorium.
Grandson of Georges Clemenceau,
the premier of France during World
War I, M. Clemenceau has been in
Washington for several months. Be-
for e committing himself to the en-
gagement here, he received permis-
sion from the State Department in
Washington.
Early in the war he was offered a
captaincy in the American Army as
he had been working in close coop-
eration with Admiral Glasford, Gen-
eral Hyde and other high ranking of-
ficials in the West African invasion
plans. However the North African
military authorities were afraid it
might look like a slight if he went in-
to the American Army at that time.
Tickets originally issued for the
Madame Koo lecture will admit hold-
ers. Individual tickets for the lecture
will be on sale 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
2 to 5 p.m., Wednesday and Thurs-
day and from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the box office in Hill Auditorium.
Max Werner, military analyst, au-
thor and newspaper correspondent,
will replace Louis Lochner who was
to have appeared here on January 13.
Mr. Werner will speak on the sub-
ject, "The Reconstruction of Europe"
on March 27.
The Michigan chapter of Phi Eta
Sigma, national freshman honorary
society for men, will hold an invita-
tion banquet at 12:30° p.m. today in
the League.
Program for the banquet includes
an address by Dean Joseph Bursley,
which will highlight the history of
Phi Eta Sigma, and the election of
officers for the coming year. Toast-
master will be J. Patrick McGee, pre-
sent vice-president of the organiza-
tion.

Army-Navy. Test Requireinients isfe

All students planning to take the
third qualifying test for the Army-
Navy college program should bring
their admission-identification forms,I
signed by Dean Joseph A. Bursley or'
Dean Walter B. Rea, to the Rackham
Auditorium 15 minutes before the
examination starts at 9 a.m, Wed-
nesday.
Two soft lead pencils should be
brought to this examination. No
slide rules, calculators, dictionaries
or other similar items may be used.
The results of the test will be used
as the basis for admitting University

enrolled students to the 4rmy A-12
or the Navy V-12 specialized train-
ing programs.
'They Shall Not Sleep
S SHAW ANO, Wis., M4arch 11.-cam)-
The Rev. H. A. Block, Pastor of the
Salem Evangelical Church at Red~
River, expects to preach to an atten-
tive congregation Sunday, as well as
in the future. His text will be: "Why
People Go To Sleep in Church."
BUY WA R BON DS

"We hope that all new students,
including the recently-arrived con-
tingent of Navy personnel as well as
civilian students, will take advantage
of the facilities of the Michigan Un-
ion," president Roy Boucher said
yesterday.
Although the Union has undergone
many changes as a result of wartime
conditions, it is still the center of all
men's activities, Boucher said. In
order to take advantage of these
facilities, students must obtain mem-
bership cards,- which are available
from 3-5 p.m. every Wednesday at
the Union Student Offices.
Union Has Many Facilities
Among the Union's attractions are
the cafeteria, barber shop, swimming
pool, steam bath, bowling alleys, pool
room, billiards and ping-pong equip-
ment.
For those interested in a quiet
place to study there is the Pendleton
Reading Library. There are also
rooms available for meetings.
In keeping with traditional Union
policy, women are allowed to enter

the Union only when escorted and
then have to use the side door.
George Johnson, who for 22 years'
has chased coeds away from the
front door, will be manning his post
again this year.
Servicemen Use Union, Too
The ballroom will retain its newly-
acquired military aspect, serving as
a mess hall for 700 ASTP students
instead of being the setting for the
pre-war type of week-end dances.
The small ballroom and the terrace
have suffered the same fate. Officers
dine in the main dining room on the
first floor at noon and in the eve-
ning, with the Union staff carrying
the full load in the kitchens.
Two special service units, the naval
architecture and the Army civil
affairs groups, now occupy most of
the guest rooms formerly reserved
for visiting alumni and guests.
Army language students are using
the third floor rooms which were
previously turned over to banquets
and campus meetings.

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